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Full text of "Duluth Evening Herald"

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All. lAiaL'.'l v^'«> 



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ACRES 

Near Short Line Park on railroad. 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 West Superior Street. 




DULUTH EVENING HERALD, 



I 







If you have Acres or Lots you want 




to sell cheap and quick, list them 




with 




E. C. HOLLIDAY, 




HOTEL rST. LOUIS BUILDING. — 









VOL.. 7; :N0. 237. 



DULUTH, MLN^N., THUBSDAX, JAXUAKY 9, 1890 



puiCB thb£le: cents. 




Do You Want to Borrow Money? 



We can let you have it and without delay. 



MONEY ON HAND 



Provided you have sufficient security. 



Ou[ Rates are the Lowest 




f I 



Applications for loans wanted at once in 



DULUTH, 1ST DULUTH OR 1ST SUPERIOR 



Improved or Unimproved Property taken. 





:\ 



il~^ 






LARGE - OH - SMALL - 



We have on hand $800, $ I 600 or $2400 

for a 



SNAP IN REAL ESTATE 



All cash. 



t 

\ 



Real [state, Acres anri Business Property a Specialty. 



Call and see what we have. 



FIRE 



INSURANCE, 



' , I 



\ 



The best Foreign and American Companies rep- 
resented. Policies correctly written. 




I 




Stryker, Manley & Buck. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 

Our Sixteeotti Semi-Anoual Red Figure Sale. 

CLOTHING- 

The Men's and Boys' Clothing catches the bargain mania 
that now runs all over the store. Not because the clothing is 
old— it Isn't; not that we are badly overstocked— we aren't; 
not on account of dull sales—sold more than last winter; but 
simply because we set out to make great sales this January, 
and bargain music is the only music for double quick sales in 
present traae conditions. 

MEN'S OVERCOATS. 

We are selling Fur-trimmed Overcoats at actual cost prices. 
The sorts for a mild winter are reduced in common with others. 

MEN'S STORM COATS. 

They will be needed yet, but to hurry your needs they come 
down today: $8 from $12; $12 from $16; $15 from $20; 
$20 from $25. 

BOYS' CAPE OVERCOATS AND SUITS. 

Some special bargains in our Boys' and Children's Clothing 
Departments. We give you all the profits. 



- li 




^i^iiim 



i^p"^^^— * 



WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



LAST EDITION, 



DAVIS Oil THE SIULT. 



Senator Davis Makes a Strong 

Speech on the Sault 

'Canal. 



Acvocates His Bill of Appro- 
priations to Complete 
Work. 



Other Washington News of 
General Interest to 
All. 



Washington, Jan. 9. — The vice-presi- 
dent laid before the senate a communi- 
cation from Attorney-General Miller in 
reeponse to a resolution adopted by the 
senate yesterday. The attorney -general 
states that no instructions, oral or 
written, have been given District At- 
torney C. H. Chambers on the subject of 
the arrest of W. W. Dudley. Xo com- 
munication, says the attorney-general, 
has been sent by the department of 
justice to the district attorney of Indi- 
ana, nor has any been received from him 
directly or indirectly with reference to 
the subject. 

The communication was ordered 
printed and referred to the committee 
on judiciary. 

Mr. Vest of Missouri, from the com- 
mittee on commerce, reported back the 
bill authorizing the construction of a 
bridge across Staten Island Sound. Mr. 
Dolph from the same committee re- 
ported back the bill for the construc- 
tion of a revenue cutter, for service on 
the Pacific coast; also the bill to prevent 
the obstruction of the navigable waters 
of the United States and to protect pub- 
lic works from trespass. 

On motion of Mr. Vest a joint resolu- 
tion was passed appropriating |"2.jO,(X)0 
for the removal of obstructions to navi- 
gation in the Missouri river, between 
St. Joseph, Mo. and the mouth. 

Mr. Davis of Minnesota, called up for 
consideration the bill appropriating i$3,- 
738,000 for the improvement of St. Marys 
river, Mich., and 11,684,000 for the im- 
provement of Hay Lake channel, Micb. 
Mr. Davis made an exhaustive speech 
upon the measure, and impressed upon 
the senate the L>enetit8 which would 
accrue to the business interests of the 
entire West from those improvementa. 

Mr. Frye, from the committee on com- 
merce, reported the following bills which 
were placed upon the calendar: Making 
Minneapolis, Minn., a sub-port of entry 
and delivery; granting American regis- 
ter* to the vessels Bernard of Phila- 
delphia and Mexico of Pensacoia; for 
the erection of a tirst order lighthouse 
at Cape Disappointment, Washington. 

Church Interference Failed. 

Washington, Jan. 9.— At a meeting of 
the senate committee of Indian affairs 
today, tbe reply of Commissioner Mor- 
gan to the charges tiled against him by 
Father Stephan, director of the Catholic 
board of missions, was presented and 
read. At the conclusion of discussion 
which followed, the committee by vote 
of six to one ordered nominations of 
Thomas J. Morgan to be Indian com- 
missioner and of D. R. Dorchester to be 
superintendent of Indian affairs to be 
reported favorably to the senate. 

Several Important NoinlneeH. 
W.\SHiNGTON, Jan. 9. — It is understood 
that the President contemplates sending 
to the senate several important nomina- 
tions within a day or two. Among them 
will probably be collectors of (.'ustoias 
and internal revenue at Chicago and 
postmasters at St. Liouis and Baltimore. 



Senators go to Matinee. 

Washington, Jan. 9. — There will be 
many vacant seats in the senate cham- 
ber this afternoon, owing to the fact 
that Miss Letitia .\ldrich, niece of Sen- 
ator Stewart of Nevada, is to make her 
debut as an actress at the National the- 
ater in the three act comedy "Maid 
Marian." It is to be a society event and 
Mra McKee and party will represent the 
White House. 



Mlnneapollit Coopers May Strike. 
MiNNiiAPOuis, Jan. 9. — A strike among 
the 700 coopers of Minneapolis is im- 
pending. The price of the best barrel 
is now 33 cents. Six years ago it was 53 
cents. Men now average about %~ a 
week in co-operative shops, and in one 
shop in the last six months the men have 
had to pay $.50 each to prevent loss. The 
men say they cannot live on their pres- 
ent wages. 

Western Indians Cede Also. 

Spoif ANF. Falls, Wash., Jan. 9.— Final 
papers of the treaty between the United 
States and Cteur d'Alene Indians were 
signed last night. The treaty conveys 
22,000 acres of the most valuable part of 
the Cceur d'Alene reservation, embracing 
the largest portion of the beautiful lake 
of that name, and much rich mineral and 
fine timber land. 



Wanted For l.igaiuy and Theft. 
Springpielu, 111., Jan. 9.— Governor 
Fifer has issued a requisition on the 
governor of Maryland for Carl Herbert, 
now in custody in Baltimore and wanted 
in Peoria for obtaining money by false 
pretenses. Herbert was arrested in Bal- 
timore a few days ago on the charge of 

bigamy. 

Unprecedently I^ow Water, 

Burlington, Iowa, Jan. 9.— The un- 
precedently low water in the river here 
is a wonder, and tbe chief topic among 
people along the Mississippi. At this 
point it is eight inches lower than it has 
been during the sixty years since white 
people came to this section, and is still 
falling fast. 

All His Own Way. 

Annapolis, Md., Jan. 9. — In demo- 
cratic caucus today Senator Wilson was 
renominated by acclamation to succeed 
himself as United Staces senator. 

A Very .Sick ttabv King. 

Madrid, Jan 9. — The illness of the in- 
fant King has assumed a most alarming 
phase. During the night he had con- 
vulsions and high fever. He is extremely 
weak. The royal physicians have little 
if any hope of recovery. The influenza 
is spreading in this city. 

Near a Trial. 

London, Jan. 9. — The libel suit of Mr. 

Parnell against The Times is among the 

I first cases that will come before Hilary 

sittinge, which commence next Satur- 

tday. 



\ HEARD FROM AGAIN. 

Victoria Woodhull Proposes to Bun for 
the Presidency in 1898. 

Boston, Mass., Jan. 9. — Papers have 
been received here from London, de- 
signed to boom Victoria C. Woodhull for 
the presidency in 1892. Upon just what 
kind of platform she will run the broad- 
sides do not definitely state. They, 
however, oontain an elaborate history of 
Mrs. Woodhull, her marriage with Mr. 
Martin, the London banker, and the 
gilt-edged sort of society in which she 
no IV moves. Tbe document points out 
the work already accomplished by Mrs. 
Woodhull and her sister. Miss Tennie 
Claflin, and concludes: 

It must bo remembered that at the time 
these ladies commoni-ed their work no woman 
la Anjoricii or Europe could hold any public 
ollice, uor even resfiectably walk uloDe in the 
streets. Thauks, however, to the couraifeous 
IniiiHtlve tukeu by Uiese noble pioneer,* ladies 
have at prest-nt a« much freedom and choice 
in these matters as have tfeutlemen them- 
selves. 

Another document sent at the same 
time and inteoded to -wA. -tb« oaueo of 
the fair presidential candidate is devoted 
to Lady Cook, once "Tennessee" Clattin. 
It isn't stated whether Mrs. Woodhull 
Martin will return to tbe United States 
or conduct her campaign from her Lon- 
don home. 



ELLA C. WHITE ESCAPES. 

The Female Financier Quietly Takes Her 
Departure froiu Jail. 

Elmira, N. Y., Jan. 9.— Ella C. White, 
the famous female financier and alleged 
forger, has escaped from the jail. Since 
her arrest in Chicago, where she was 
known as Mrs. Worth, she has been ac- 
corded unusual liberties in the jail. She 
has been allowed to take exercise in the 
corridors every evening, and last night 
took her usual stroll about midnight. 

Turnkey Isaac Garrabrant heard a 
noise in her cell which led him to be- 
lieve that she had retired for the night. 
He locked the door and nothing more 
was thought of her until about 1:30 this 
afternoon, when her dinner was taken to 
her and she was not found. It is sup- 
posed that she was in the corridor when 
her cell was locked last ni^ht, and made 
her escape through the sheriff's resi- 
dence in the front part of the jail, the 
door of which was unlocked. Diligent 
search has been made for her in this 
city since the discovery of her escape, 
and telegrams have been dispatched to 
surrounding towns, but as yet they have 
proved unavailing. 



'TIS PERFE CT PR OTECTION. 

An Erie Electrician Discovers a Safe 
Personal Insulation. 

Erie, Pa., Jan. 9. — Electricians in this 
section of the state were invited by Su- 
perintendent Jacob Pfetch, of the Erie 
Motor Car company, to witness a test of 
personal insulation yesterday, 

Pfetch, alarmed at the fatalities in 
New York and elsewhere, studied day 
and night to arrest the danger lying in 
overcharged wires. He fortified himself 
and took hold of the buzz rod of tbe dy- 
namos with bis bare hands which he dip- 
ped in water. He then stepped on a pile of 
wet dirt and received the full charge, 
over 500 volts, the force used to operate 
about ten miles of road. To the sur- 
prise of everyone, the electricity did not 
ground and the Superintendent felt no 
effects whatever. 

This invention is a secret to himself 
and upon which he will apply for a 
patent at once. The insulation enables 
linemen and others to handle any wire 
with safety and is an absolute protec- 
tion. 

Lawrence Karrett Again. 

Boston, Jan. 9. — It is officially nn- 
nounced that the operation recently per- 
formed on Lawrence Barrett, who has 
been suffering from a glandular swelling 
of the neck, which threatened to compel 
his permanent retirement from the stage, 
has been entirely successful, and the 
probabilities are that he will be suf- 
ficiently recovered to start out anew in 
October next. Three weeks hence he 
leaves America for the German springs. 
His personal loss through the abrupt 
termination of his season is placed by 
those in a position to know at $30,000. 



The Morton Banquet. 

Washington, Jan. 9.— The banquet to 
be given tonight to President Harrison 
by Vice-President and Mrs. Morton will 
be the great social event of the season. 
No expense has beec spareil, and the 
total outlay will run into figures, which, 
to other than millionaires, will seem 
simply apalhng. It will take place in 
the big diningroom of the Morton man- 
sion which is larger and more elaborately 
furnished than the state diningroom at 
the White House The company will 
be a distinguished one. 

Floods in Indiana. 

Jasper, Ind., Jan. 9. — The Patoka river 
has risen at an alarming rate during the 
last twenty-four hours. A tract of 
country twenty miles l)y three to four 
miles wide is inundated. The Jasper 
branch of the Air line is overflowed be- 
tween here and Huntingburg. Two 
hotels, several mills and a large number 
of dwelling houses are surrounded by 
water. 

CONDENSED TELEGRAPH. 



Nine murderers will be hanged at 
Fort Smitfc, Ark., Thursday of next 
week. 

The German National bank of Osb- 
kosh, Wis., has been authorized to do 
business with a capital of $100,000. 

The recently renewed heavy rains are 
playing havoc with some of the railroad 
lines in central Illinois. 

Business of the New York supreme 
court is suspended, every one of the 
judges being down with the influenza. 

The Austrian ship Providence, bound 
from Constantinople to Marseilles, 
foundered at sea in a heavy gale. All on 
board were lost. 

It is reported at Sioux Falls, S. D., 
that no more aid is needed for Miner 
county destitute families. 

Wisoonsin's governor has appointed 
Robert G. Siebecker to succeed the late 
Judge Alva Stewart of Madison. 

A St. Louis paper contains another 
expose of "boodling" in the city govern- 
ment. This time tbe claim is made that 
84000 was paid for passing the union 
market bill through the house of dele- 
gates. 

Tbe steamer Wide West, which left 
.\8toria Dec. 25, bound for Seattle on 
Puget sound, has been wrecked on 
Destruction island, and is reported a 
total loss. Officers and crew were res- 
cued. 

The Colorado attorney-general has 
begun suit against several ex-state 
treasurers for the purpose of recovering 
money which these officials received as 
interest on state funds. 



In order to give everybody a chance 
to participate in the benefits of our 
great holiday reduction sale, I have 
decided to continue it for the balance of 
this month. Don't miss the opportunity 
to get reliable goods at away-down 
prices. Sale closes positively Friday, 
Jan. 31. Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 

For quick sales list your property 
with Merritt & Leddell, room 4, Fargus- 
son building. 



SOME MORE BUDD[NS[IK. 



Walls of a Brooklyn Church 
Fall With Crush- 
ing Weight. 



Five are Killed Outright and 

Two More Fatally 

Hurt. 



N«w York, Jan. 9, — An appaling dis- 
aster occurred in Brooklyn this morning. 
Heavy winds last night shook the new 
Presbyterian church at 296 Throop ave- 
EV io its foundation and at 4:30 this 
morning one of the walls fell with a 
crash on a three-story frame building 
adjoining, and brought with it death 
and destruction. 

The ruined building was tenanted by 
the Mott and Purdy families. They 
numbered nine persons. Five of them 
are reported dead. Two were carried 
out of the ruins so seriously injured that 
their death is only a question of a few 
hours. 

The following is a list of those re- 
ported dead: David Purdy, aged 14; 
Caroline Purdy, aged 16; May Purdy, 
aged 18; Mrs. Caroline Mott, aged 75; 
Sarah Mott, aged 45. 

The injured are: Emma J. Purdy, 
aged 40; RoLiert Poole, aged 63, 

The noise of the falling wall attracted 
tbe attention of a policeman and he sent 
in a fire alarm and summoned tbe re- 
serve from a police station near at hand. 
A great crowd gathered, gazing blankly 
at the ruins of the dwelling and the 
scattered church. The house had been 
torn in such a manner that a bedroom 
was exposed and in tbe bed, within plain 
view of those in the street, lay the dead 
body of Miss Mary Purdy, borne down 
beneath a mass of debris. The fearful 
spectacle seemed to stun those who wit- 
nessed it and for a few moments nothing 
was done to render assistance to those 
within. 

Then the policemen and firemen 
arrived and started in to the rescue. 
They first found Mrs. Emma Purdy 
lying in her bed, crushed beneath a mass 
of timbers and bricks, and so seriously 
injured that she could not speak or move 
even when they had carried her out of 
the charnel house into tbe street, Robt, 
Poole was the next one found alive. He 
is also so seriously injured that no hope 
is entertained of his recovery. 

Aa far as known at this writing, none 
of the inmates in the bouse escaped | 
death or injury. The crowd about the 
scene numbers several thousand, and 
the search for bodies is being hurried on. 
Miss Mary Purdy's body, crushed and 
mangled in a fearful way, was brought 
out and laid on tbe sidewalk under tbe 
blankets in which she slept last night. 
She was a beautiful young woman. It 
is reported that she was engaged to be 
married soon. 

The church itself is rendered useless 
and will have to be replaced by a new 
one. 

BIG MILLS B URN. 

Large Indianapolis Hominy Mills Totally 
Destroyed by Fire. 

Indianapolis, Ind., Jan. 9. — At 3 
o'clock this morning fire broke out in the 
West Indianapqlis hominy mills, and at 
4 o'clock the immense building, covering 
a quarter of an acre, was a mass of ruins. 

The mill was one of the finest and 
largest in the country. It was built by 
Hall <<;: Lilly, but C. K Hall was the sole 
owner of the plant at the time of de- 
struction. The loss to him is particu- 
larly severe at this time, as tbe mill was 
running full time to catch up with 
orders, which have been unusually heavy. 
Loss, 875,000; insurance, $40,000. 

MANY DEATHS. 



New Vork's Death List is the Largest In 
Years. 

New York, Jan. 9,— The grip is spread- 
ing in this city, as shown by yesterday's 
mortality list, which records 250 deaths. 
This is the biggest number known in 
tbe history of the health department in 
any twenty-four hours during a winter 
month, and is more than in any sum- 
mer month since July 2, 1872, when 351 
deaths occurred, sixty-eight of which 
were from sunstroke. Four of yester- 
day's deaths were due directly to influ- 
enza, and many more indirectly. 
"New York, Jan. 9.— The number of 
deaths during the twenty-four hours 
ending this afternoon reported to the 
Bureau of Vital statistics, was 207, a de- 
crease of 43 as compared with the pre- 
ceding twenty-four hours. Of these 
deaths 24 were attributed to consump- 
tion, 22 to bronchitis, and 63 to pneu- 
monia, 14 to influenza. 



MORE B AD M EDICINE. 

Montreal General Merchants Defrauded by 
^ Men of Experience. 
MoNTR>i\L, Jan. 9. — Detectives have 
succeeded in recovering 810,000 worth of 
the $25,000 worth of goods out of 
which Ellis & Co., general merchants of 
Smiths Falls and Carleton Place, at- 
tempted to defraud Montreal merchants. 
Ellis & Co. got safely away with the rest 
of the property. It has been learned 
that the firm treated Philadelphia 
merchants to a similar experience about 
three years ago. 

TO CAUCUS TONIGHT 



The Ohio Democrats will Caucus This 
Evening for Senator. 

Columbus, Ohio. Jan. 9. — The dem- 
ocratic senatorial caucus will be held 
tonight, and the adherents of Brice 
are making the best use of tbe few 
hours that remain to them. Tbe indi- 
dications at this writing are that he 
will be the choice of the caucus by a big 
majority, in which case his election is 
ensured. The town is crowded with 
politicans from every section of the state, 
and the hotels and other public resorts 
have an animated appearance. 

A Mayor Resigns. 
RocHRSTER, Minn., Jan. 9. — Mayor 
Porter has tendered his resignation of 
that office, to take effect immediately. 
Alderman Jacks was elected 
acting mayor. This resign- 

ation is caused by Porter's 
signing tbe bonds of $45,000 to the 
Rochester & St, Paul Railroad company. 



stole a Congressman. 
Washington, Jan. 9.— Dr. Beall, a 
physician of this city, charged with rob 
bing a grave iri the Congressional ceme- 
tery, was last night convicted and was 
sentenced to six months' imprisonment 
in jail and required to pay a fine of 
$400. 

Is Living. 

Washington, Jan. 9.— The latest re- 
port from Judge Kelley is, "'He ia Btill 
alive." 



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FOR E XTRAD ITION. 

A Wide Scope of Extraditable Offenses; 
Why Not for all Crimes ? 
Ottawa, Jan. 9.— A copy of the pro- 
posed extradition treaty between the 
United States and Great Britain has 
been received by tbe minister of justice. 
Tbe scope of the proposed treaty is very 
wide, especially in contrast with the 
treaty of 1842, which contains only four 
offenses. If the pending treaty is 
adopted, some legislation by the Do- 
minion parliament will be necessary to 
bring Canada under its provisions. 

Guiteau's Nephew Absconds. 
Chicago, Jan. 9. — L. P. Scoville, a 
nephew of Guiteau, the assassin of 
President Garfield, has disappeared, and 
his whereabouts are unknown. He was 
the secretary of a local building and 
loan association, and it is alleged that be 
is short in his accounts to the extent 
of between $5000 and $6000. He is a son 
of George Scoville, whose wife was a sis- 
ter of Guiteau. 



She Rules the Waves. 

Zanzibar, Jan. 9. — The largest fleet of 
British war ships ever assembled in 
these waters is now here, and other men- 
of-war of the same nationality are still 
arriving. The excitement occasioned by 
the presence of the fleet is intense and 
speculation is rife concerning the object 
of tbe gathering of the war vessels. 

Fatally Shot by a Former Servant. 

Jacksonville, III., Jan. 9. — Early this 
evening Nathan Porter, a colored man, 
shot Miss Frankie Keener, a white lady, 
for whom he had formerly worked. She 
returned his fire, breaking his right arm. 
Miss Keener received two woun^ which 
are likely to prove fatal. 

Iowa's Legislature. 
Des Moines, Iowa, Jan, 9. — The roll of 
members of tbe legislature in the city up 
to noon reached fifty. The canvass for 
the minor offices is warm, but is confined 
entirely to the -epublicans, ' The prohi- 
bition convention met at 10 this morn- 
ing, but did nothing more than tempor- 
arily organize. 

Captain O'Shea Again. 
Dublin, Jan. 9.— Upon the application 
of Cant. O'Shea an attachment has been 
issued against The Freemans Journal 
in a suit for damages brought by Capt. 
O'Shea against that paper for its com 
ments upon him in connection with his 
suit for divorce. In an interview today 
Mr. E. Dwyer Gray, the proprietor of 
The Journal, said he was ready to meet 
Capt. O'Shea in any court. 

Followers of Walton, 

Minne.\polis, Jan. 9, — The Minnesota 
Angling club, with a purpose stated as 
"the instruction and mutual improve- 
ment in the art of angling and social 
culture and entertainment," was incor- 
porated today. It will erect a club 
bouse on Lake Miltona, in Douglas 
county. Its members are to hunt, fish, 
explore lakes. Etc. The capital stock is 
SlO.CXX). The incorporators are J. W. 
Lauberdale, Ira F. Murphy, E. G. Hay, 
J. C. Wymony, John A. Hilliker, Willard 
G. Hollis. Arkey G. Strong and Robert 
D. Russell. 



After the Portuguese. 
London, Jan. 9. — The Times has ascer- 
tained that the order of the Portuguese 
authorities forbidding British steamers 
to receive at Quillimine letters from the 
vice-consul and other British subjects 
was issued on Sept. 10, A month after 
Mr, Johnson, the British consul at Mo- 
zambique, had reached the Shire river. 
The Times says the order was probably 
issued with the direct view of delaying 
Mr, Johnson's dispatches, 

S 1 T O BOS TON. 

The Sault Will Make That Rate Very 
Soon. 

Minneapolis, Jan, 9. — [Special.] — It is 
announced here that the Soo road has 
on hand a supply of ready printed rate 
sheets to be used at a moment's notice, 
making rates as low as $10 to Boston. 



The Rate War. 

The future of the rate war, so far as 
concerns the St. Paul-Chicago roads, will 
be decided today at the Passenger asso- 
ciation meeting at Chicago. The Chi- 
cago Eastern roads have heretofore made 
an agreement not to pro rate with any 
St. Paul road on Eastern tickets. If 
this should be tbe mind of tbe meeting 
today the Burlington & Quincy will be 
knocked out of the fight and the Soo and 
South Shore will be masters of the situa- 
tion. All the St. Paul lines are anxiously 
awaiting the result of the conference. 

MILLER S ME SSAGE. 

Plain Talk About the Financial Condition 
of Nortli Dakota. 

Bismarck, N. D., Jan. 9. — Governor 
Miller has sent a special message to the 
legislature upon the financial condition 
of the state. He referred to his esti- 
mate of the deficiency of $155,870, and 
said a more careful investigation of af- 
fairs showed th^t the original estimate 
was entirely too small. He estimated 
the deficiency on March 8 at $240,000, 

Then he put the question: How is 
the state to provide for the payment of 
the current expenses? He quoted the 
debt limit clause of the constitution, and 
remarked that tbe $200,000 limit will 
soon be reached. Next he cited the 
clause that says no bond or evidence of 
indebtedness shall be valid unless the 
same shall be endorsed by the auditor 
and secretary of state, showing that it is 
issued pursuant to law and within the 
debt limit. The governor said: 

This action clearly prohibits the 
auditor under any circumstances, for 
any purpose, from issuing any warrants 
in excess of $200,000. How, then, and by 
what means are the expenses of the 
maintenance of the government and the 
various public institutions to be met? 

To him it is clear that when the limit 
is reached the state officers have no 
means of providing for the maintenance 
of the state. The message was referred 
to the committee on ways and means. 
It IS a timely warning. 

REAL ESTATE. 



A Record of the Real Estate Transfers fi»r 
'/t4 Hours Ending at Noon. 

Abble A Durbank to Ida Waufrb, the 
8'/iofthe 8W!4 of swi* :W-4»-l5 «1,330 

Inez A Calkins to the NorthwesU^rn 
Land Loan company, lot NJ, blocit 
B6. Duluth proper. Third division 3,000 

H W Cofflu to Edward I. Morris, the 
8wi4of section (KW-IS 2,400 

St. Paul & Duluth railroad company to 

H W CofHn, swi* section 9-60-16 1,600 

William Mcliiuuou to Margaret Curry, 
oH of 8w!« and 8wi4 of swH eectloQ 
31V«)-15 1,234 

John Flynn to Alexander D Sterene. of 
Waverly, N. Y.. lot 16, block 128. Port- 
lands division 475 

James Sheridan to M Vnll. lots 11 and 12. 
Inlilotik 15. vlllaffe plat of Ely 900 

Gus Forgeson to Mury Dl Marco, et al., 
lots 1 and 2. block 105, West Duluth. 
Second division 1,460 

Emanuel Levy to M Vail, lot 9, In block 
n.townof Ely 400 



9 transfers ; consideration $11,779 



A double coraer on East Second 
street, in Endion, only $2600; one-third 
cash, balance one and two years, 
D. H, Stevenson & Co., 

43 Exchange buildiiig. 



DULUTH CATHOLICS DAY. 



Formal Reception of the 
New B shop of Duluth 
Tonight. 



Evergreens and Electric Light 

Decorations Welcome 

Him. 



The Installation to Take 

Place ^Sunday at the 

Church. 



A special trs in of three coaches left 
St, Paul at 12: J5 p. m. today with the 
St, Paul delegation which is to accom- 
pany Bishop M.cGolrick from Minneapo- 
lis to his new field of labor at Duluth. 
With tbe party were Archbishop Ire- 
land and Moneeigneur O'Connell. The 
train reached Minneapolis at 12:.j(), 
Here Bishop McGolrick, and the 
Duluth and Minneapolis contingents 
met the St. Paul party. 

The Duluth escort consists 

of twenty well-known citizens, 
amDng them Ixiing Mayor Sutphin, R. A. 
Costello, N. J. Miller and C. P. Magin- 
nis. A large ielegation from Minne- 
apolis acGompi nies the bishop, the fol- 
lowing being 'vith the party: Itev. P. 
Kenny, J. S. Coughlin, Prank Daily, 
James R. Corri ;an, John Norton, Matt 
Walsh, Ed. 0'l;rien,M. W.Nash, Kich- 
ara Walsh, Peli s Trainor, Thomas Quinn, 
A. J. Finnegan, Timothy J. McCarthy, 
T. Connolly, bernard Cloutier, James 
Baxter, Denis Trainor, John S. llyan, 
John Kennedv, Martin Byrnes, M. 
O'Reilly, Edward Kennedy, W, U, Dona- 
hoe, P. H. Prendergast; Edward W. 
White, St. Paul; C.L. Haas, St. Paul; 
Brother Gideon, P. Churchill, T. Cor- 
bet t, E. W. Mutphy. 

Liast night tl e bishop and the Duluth 
party were tendered a reception at the 
residence of George A. BrackeDt, at 025 
Fifth street soi th. Many disiinguished 
citizens of the Twin cities were present. 
At 1 o'clofjk tho party left Minneapolis 
for Duluth, and will reach here at 7 
o'clock this evening. 

Across Secoid avenue west below 
Fourth street in great evergreen letters 
illuminated by electric glol^s, hangs the 
word "Welcomii." The church of the 
Sacred Heart ie decorated with fiowers, 
potted plants ana evergreens, and elec- 
tric globes ha ng in branches over the 
auditorium. Outside the church are 
many decoratiins of green. Prepara- 
tions are all complete for giving Bisbop 
McGolnck a hearty and cordial recep- 
tion. 1 he part i will be met at the train 
by tbe Catholic so'jieties of the head of 
the lakes and \\, committee of citizens 
consisting of A! essrs. Hartley, Graves, 
Cash, Ensign, ILoopes and Mendenhall. 
Grand Marshal James Parrell will have 
charge of the pi'ocession. All those tak- 
ing part in the escort will report at 6:45 i 
at the corner of Sixth avenue west and { 
Superior street. The divisions will be ' 
in the following order: 

Blrst division, li chartro of M. Uoppa, will 
be headed by Walkers Military band, with the 
Father Matthew 'J'emperauce society, St. Stan- 
islaus, Kosta, Hjly Cross. St. Joseph uud 
National lienevoUnt societies. 

Second dlvisiot, in charge of Frank Kelly, 
beaded by the tiuperior bund, with division 
No. 1 A. O. H., Douglas county. Wis.; divi- 
sions No. 1 and A A. O. H., St. Louis county, 
Minn. 

Third division, la charge of Joseph Couture, 
headed by the French band, with St. Jean lia|>- 
tiste and St. Uoui ace societies. 
'.Fourth dlvisiot, in charj^e of Capt. De- 
Witt, liishop Mcijolrlck, invited guests, car- 
riages, and inouuled escort. 

Tlie line of ma -ch will be from the depot, 
up Sixth avenue west to Superior street, to 
Second avenue W3st, to Church or*the Sacred 
lleart on Foui tli i treet. 

Large delegations of citizens from 
West Superior ind Supreior will attend 
the meeting at the church. The meet- 
ing will simply be one of welcome, and 
addresses will l»e made by Archbishop 
Ireland, Bidhop McGolrick and others. 
All regular atteadants at church are re- 
quested to give up their seats for visi- 
tors. The exercises will last about an 
hour, when the line of march will be 
taken to The Spalding, where covers 
have been laid for a banquet 
to begin at 9 o'clock. The supper 
will be one of the most elab- 
orate Landlord Emerson has ever served, 
and for the occiision the diningroom will 
look like a flowor garden. All the facili- 
ties Duluth atfords have been brought 
into requisition, and the fioral decora- 
tions will be fine. 

Hon. C. H. G -aves will be master of 
ceremonies, anc toasts will be given by 
Judge Stearns, Judge Ensign, Secretary 
Phelps, Mayor liutphin and othere, with 
responses by Iiishop McGolrick, Arch- 
bishop Ireland Archbishop Grace a^d 
Mons. O'Connel. After the banquet an 
informal recept ion will take place in The 
Spalding parlois. 

On Sunday morning will occur tbe 
formal installation of the bishop accord- 
ing to the elaborate ceremony of the 
Roman Cathol c church. Archbishop 
Ireland will prnach the sermon and lead 
the service and will be chief in the cere- 
mony. The cliurch will probably not 
hold one quart* r of tbe people who will 
desire to attend, but special arrange- 
ments are mado to accommodate all who 
can be handled 



CITY BPIi^FS. 



There was a very decided fall in the 
barometer all over llie Northwest. This 
usually indicaU's a corresponding nse in 
the temperature. 

Leonidas Merritt htis removed his 
office to Oueota. Tbe immense safe and 
all belongings of the Mountain Range 
Iron company are being taken out of the 
Fargustiou building and will be in the 
Oueota ollice. Mr. Merritt will still re- 
tain his present quarters for city busi- 
ness. 

Edward L. Lawyer and Kate Nelson 
obtained a marriage license this morn- 
ing. 

About 175 tickets to the banquet this 
evening have already been sold. 

L. Meudenhali, R. D. Mallet and R. C. 
Mitchell will, according to the Chamber 
of Commerce, represeut at Washington 
the Sauit canal, harbor improvements 
and public building appropriation. 
There geuilemen were selected for th© 
reason, amoug otUers, that they are to 
be in Wiishiugiou and are willing to 
work. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office, Hotel St. Louis: 12 m., 
18 below ; 6 p. m., 17 ; G p. m., 15 above; 
10 p. m., 9 above; 7 a. m.. 13' above; 
9 a. m., 15 above; 12 m., 19 above. 
Maximum, 19 above. Minimum, 9* 
above. Duilyrange, 10 . 

\ squad of police has been detailed by 
request of acting Mayor Costello to head 
the procession escorting Archbishop 
Ireland aud McGolnck. The squad will 
consist ot eight of Duluth's "finest," 
headed by Capt. McLaugiilin, who will 
be the liglitest mau of tbe lot. 

A restaurant is being fitted up in the 
old "wliite deer" store by a Minneapolis 
man named Walker. Ha will open an- 
other rebtauraut shortly. 

The last vestige af tbe old burned-out 
fur store on East Superior street was re- 
moved this moruing. 

A large galvanized iron frame for the 
skylight of the Clague <k Prindle build- 
ing was received this morning, 

A quantity of iron beams aud girders 
for the Buchanan buiidiug were placed 
on the ground this moruiug. If the 
present weather continues some of the 
interior work will be carried on, begia- 
nmg tomorrow. 



PERSONAL. 



If you want to make money quick 
call on Merri;t & Leddell, room 4 
Fargusson bull ling. 



Mr. John Robertson, who has been the 
Canadian customs official at this port 
for several months, left for Tacoma this 
afternoon where lie will officiate in a 
similar capacity. During the gentle- 
man's slay here he has made many 
warm friuuds who desire nothing better 
than to see him back again. 

Mr, J, M, Anderson, accompanied by 
his father-in-law, Mr, C, E, Dyer, the 
Minneapolis rei)reseniative of the firm 
of C. E. Dyer, Jl Co,, returned to the 
city this morning. Mrs. Anderson will 
be here early next week. 

Mr. C C. Merritt returned from a 
business trip to the cities, yesterday. 

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. C, M. 
Newman of 1575 East Superior street, 
died Ihib moruing. 

Mr, John H. Harris returned home 
last evening after a two weeks sojourn 
in Ohio, where he has been visiting 
friends. 

Mr. C. M, Parkhurst left last night for 
a business trip of some weeks to the 
Pacific coast. 

Mr. A. M. Baldwin, formerly of the law 
firm of Trussell, Prosser Jc Baldwin of 
Minneapolis, has decided to locate in 
Duluth, and has opened an office in the 
First National bank building. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Priudle have re- 
turned from a visit to St. Paul. 

Mr. .1. B. McKiunon, iron River, is in 
the city. 

Mr. H. M. Townsend, a La Moure, N. 
D., boniface, is in the city on his way to 
Kenton, Mich. 

Fred Baker, cashier of the .\dams Ex- 
press company, is sick. It is not neces- 
sary to mention the nature of his 
malady. 

Vice-President Carpenter of the Du- 
luth «fc Iron Range road returns tomor- 
row from I he East. 

Secretary Welles of the Board of 
Trade is back from Iowa. He is not 
well yet, however. 

A son was born yesterday to Mr, and 
Mrs. W, D. Evans. 

Dr. V. Smith and wife leave today for 
a w inter's sojourn in Florida. They will 
make Jacksonville their headquarters. 

Mr. C. V. Davis of Soudan, is at The 
Spalding. 

Two New Companies. 

Articles of incorporation of the Enter- 
prise Iron & Lund company and the 
Hope Iron & Laud company are filed 
w ith the register of deeds. Both are or- 
ganized for miuiug and smelting iron 
and copjier ore and disposing of the pro- 
duct. Tbe capital stock of the first is 
$."jO,0(.K), with a limit of indebtedness of 
^fUOO. The officers, who are also direc- 
tors and incorporators, are Joseph Frank, 
president; Emil Hartman, vice-presi- 
dent; Leoijold Moss, general manager; 
Lazarus S. Minzesheimer, secretary; 
David Goodman, treasurer. The capital 
stock of the Uoiw Iron ic Land com- 
pany is 82.5,000, and the limit of indebted- 
ness is $2.5,000. The olficers are the same 
as those of the Enterprise company, ex- 
cept that Lazarus Silverman is treasurer 
in place of David Goodman. 



We have the best bargain ever offered 
on First street. One lot, .50x140 feet, 
only $1300; half cash, balance one and 
two years. 

D. H. Stkvenson k Co.. 

4^^ Exchange building. 



Uancing and Deportment. 

Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 

names for his second term at No. 11.^ 

West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 

davs; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents', 

Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 



REAL ESTATE 



SJpecial Bargains ! Snaps. 



3 Lots in Endion, $4500. 

2 Lots in Highland Park, $2500. 
20 Acres in I 0-50- 1 4 at a bargain. 
63 Lois adjoining London, cheap. 



A few of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale on easy terms. 

Twenty acres on the hill at a great bargain. 



( 



J. M. ROOT & CO., 



Room 9, Metropolitan Block. 



•esBmooiKasi 



\ 



1 






DVLUm EYEKDSG TTKRAI 



I^^^ 



AiTUABY 9, 



EVEXIXa HERALD. 

ELIOT LORD, Publisher. 

PRICE, THREE CENTS— Subscription Rate*: 

Dally, by tnall, per year $7.00 

Daily, by mail, per three months 2.00 

Dally, by mail, f>er <>iie mouth 76 

IW THE CITY. 

D»lly, by carrier, per week '8 

Entered at the poetoftice at Duluth, Minn., as 
•ecoud-c'lu^ mall matter. 

PBThe Washinjrton office of The Herald l.i 
at \^H New York avouuc, N. W., when? the 
paper is liept on Hie iiuJ where The Heralil 
correspou.ient will welcome Tisltore from the 
North weat. 



The Herald has closed arraogements 
for the most complete telegraphic serv- 
ice of any newspaper in the Northwest 
outside of the Twin cities and will from 
this time on K>^'0 fi^il I'l^ports of all the 
latest news of the country, besides cov- 
ering the local tield as efficiently as pos- 
sible. Now is the time to subscribe. 
Apply to business office for sample 
copies. 

A SPLENDID EXAMPLE. 

The estraordinary growth, both abso- 
lute and relative, of the iron and steel 
industry in the West is clearly and forc- 
ibly set forth by E. C. Potter of the Il- 
linois Steel company in The Age of 
Steel. The birth of this industry dates 
from the establishment in 1835 of a . 
iron rolling mill with two small charcoal 
blast furnaces at Wyandotte, Mich., a 
suburb of Detroit in 1S55. The first heat 
of Bessemer steel ever made in America 
was blown at an experimental plant at 
this mill in lSiJ.3. and the ingots were 
sent to Chicago and rolled at the North 
Chicago mill, into rails, that same year. 
From these small beginnings see the pres- 
ent evolution. The small iron rolling 
null of 1857, making 300 tons of iron 
rails per week, has expanded in 
thirty years to a mill capaole of 
making tJcXX) tons of steel rails per week, 
or just twenty times the capacity of the 
original mill. Three hundred tons of 
rails, which was the weekly capacity in 
1857, have actually been rolled in a mill 
of the present diiy, between 6 o'clock in 
the morning and noon, thus doing in six 
hours what it once took six days to ac- 
complish. 

As in rolling mills, so in blast fur- 
naces. The same furnace which in ISGO, 
was making 2.30 tons of iron per week, 
twenty years later with absolutely no 
chantre whatever in the furnace or its 
equipment, but simply with the improve- 
ments derived from better knowledge 
was made to yield over 7(X) tons per 
week. And the same furnace with a 
single change in its hot blast stoves 
from iron pipe stoves to modern fire- 
brick stoves is made to produce 1100 tons 
per week, or more than four times its 
original yield. 

With the extension and perfection of 
improvements the growth of the in- 
dustry in the West has been so swift 
that the single state of Illinois, which 
practically means the city of Chicago, 
including the works at Joliet, now pro- 
duces more than one-fourth of all the 
iron aud steel in the country and the 
works of the Illinois Steel company 
alone now have the capacity for making 
one-third of all steel rails that can be 
made in America. This declaration 
means that the chief seat of the steel- 
producing industry has shifted from the 
Middle states to the West and shifted 
beyond recall. Three years ago, the city 
of Chicago alone produced more steel 
than the county of Alleghany, including 
the city of Pittsburg, and the like su- 
premacy has been maintained in 18S8, 
and the year just closed. 

Now the wonder of this shifting and 
this growth is the greater from the fact 
that nowhere within the limits of the 
city of Chicago or its neighborhood or 
the whole state of Illinois indeed, are 
there any of the raw materials required 
for the manufacture of iron and steel. 
All the ores necessary are brought, as 
Mr. Potter says, a distance of 350 miles 
from the Laake Superior region and all the 
fuel for iron smelting a distance of nearly 
600 miles from the Connellsville district' 
Pennsylvania. Not natural advantages 
then, but extraordinarily developed fa- 
cilities of transportation coupled with 
extraordinary energy and ability have 
wrought this great change, which has 
put Chicago at the head of the steel 
producing districts in America. In this 
exhibit and record, is there not a lesson 
and inspiration for us at the head of the 
lakes? 

If Chicago m less than thirty years 
has been able to accomplish so much, if 
she has lifted an industry from nothing 
to tie foremost place in America, what 
may not Duluth hope to do, under con- 
ditions of production and transportation 
certainly more favorable on the whole? 
The Lake Superior ores, which are 
carried hundreds of miles to Chicago, lie 
at our very doors. From every port of 
the lower great lakes, coal or 
coke or charcoal can be carried 
to Duluth as cheap or cheaper than to 
Chicago. Our harbor is the finest on 
the lakes — not a river clogged with 
bridges — and our facilities for receiving 
and shipping are unsurpassed in the 
country. So patent are our advantages, 
and so obviously is the head of the lakes 
marked out as the natural center of the 
steel producing industry, that we may 
confidently hope before many years to 
make Chicago look to her laurels, as 
she, in her turn, won the crown from the 
Iron city of the East. 



and harlx>r bill entailed a further delay 
of over a year before anything could be 
done. Tl e same blind and narrow 
view which maintains a shipping 
commerce of over seven million 
tons annually in a condition 
which threatens it daily with lack of 
an outlet may be said to be still in 
operation among our great body of 
national economists. A single lock 
which is threatened every hour, whose 
InsuffiLiency keeps vessels of larger 
burden from making an unbroken 
journey aud which is day by day lessen- 
ing in its relative adequacy to the work 
which is required of it represents the 
congressional understanding of one of 
the foremost needs of the country. 

It is true that the representatives 
whose voices in former years might be 
heard in advocacy of the freedom and 
efficiency of this great national highway 
were comparatively few, and that their 
infiuence, when pitted against opposing 
interests, was but slight. But this state 
of things has changed. Now eight sov- 
ereign slates and two territories are im- 
mediately concerned in the granting of 
tho most liberal appropriations, and so 
far as can be seen at the present moment 
representatives of those states and ter- 
litories are united in making their de- 
mand respect-ed. The administration 
which is in power is committed to the 
policy of liberal appropriations for the 
improvement of the marine highways of 
internal commerce. 

The entire West is interested in the 
prompt discharge by congress of its full 
duty in this regard. The recent action 
of the Cleveland board of trade in for- 
warding to Washington a resolution 
pointing out tho utter inadequacy of the 
present locks to the needs of the com 
merce passing through the canal is very 
strong evidence that even the Central 
and Western states, which are not within 
the direct scope of the commerce of 
Lake Superior, are satisfied that the 
work awaiting the favorable action of 
congress is no mere sectional undertak- 
ing, but that the entire country has an 
abiding interest in its early completion. 
Our own representatives will be ex- 
pected to exhaust every effort and re- 
source of legislative knowledge and 
skill to put an end to the shameless and 
stupid delay of wnich the country has 
been the victim in regard to the great 
water highway of .Northwestern com- 
merce. 

The Herald receives a printed copy of 
Maj. Quinu's annual report of operations 
in harbors under his control. As The 
Herald quoted a column or two from 
this report three months ago, when it 
was first made public, it is not necessary 
now to give it extended notice, except to 
say, as we said then, that it is a valua- 
ble document and that its recommenda- 
tions are clear and keen, showing much 
business ability. 



LITTLE CHUNKS OF NEWS. 



The Duluth News "Annual" was is- 
sued this morning. It is the fourth new 
year edition of the pamphlet and is not- 
ably the best of all. Its ninety pages of 
letter press are as full of meat as they 
could well be crammed and it all is meat 
that digests well in the stomach of any 
friend of Duluth. It has a number of 
illustrations, notable among which is a 
large photograph reproduction of a view 
of the eutire central portion of the city. 
This annual is well worth a wide circu- 
lation. 



SEEN AND HEARD. 



TO END DELAY. 

A sharp, but not too sharp, prod in 
the ribs of congress is given by The St. 
Paul Dispatch in its appeal yesterday in 
the line of the call of The Herald for 
prompt and adequate action on the 
needs of the Sault Ste. Marie. With 
entire truth it says. 

The inaction and the want 
of perception which is charge- 
able against congress in connection with 
the improvement of the Sault Ste. 
Marie canal may be said to be as grave 
in results on the internal commerce of 
the country as discreditable to the judg- 
ment and efficiency of that body. lu 



I asketl an old. theatrical manager recently 
whom be thouffht of siDgor<j has bad the most 
remarkable career. "You will tbink of Jenny 
Lind, Albin or Pattl," he assumed, "but I 
reme'nber ouo sitifftr whose history inter- 
weaves that of three nation;), aud who was 
indirectly responsible for three great events 
in the ezisteuce of nations 

• * ♦ * 

"Id 1885 William Paine, the millionaire, for 
his own amusement equipped an opera com- 
pany for the road. Among- the applicants for 
a position was Eliza Hensler. She aaUK 
as sweetly as she looked. she took 
the [lart of Andaljiisa in "Norma." Her father 
was a poor tal;or in Boston. After the operatic 
gea-*<in ended Mr. Palue sent lier to Paris to 
continue her musical studies. Afterwards 
Mi.'s Hensler procured an engagement in the 
opera at Llsl)on. There she was taken under 
the i>rotection of Dorn Fernando, the consort 
of Queen Maria dclla Gloria. Soon after the 
death ri^he Queen, Eliza Hensler was created 
Countess of Elda by Dom Fernando, who, after 
paving suffici'-nt respect to the memory of the 
Queen, married her. Eliza's husband being 
originally a prince of the house of < oburg, the 
Boston tailor's daughter became sister-in-law 
to Queen Victoria, aunt to the Prince of Wales 
and the King of the Belgians, besides mother- 
in-law to the now King of Portugal. 
* * * 

'•When Queen Isabella of Spain was sent 
into exile, the grandees of Spain favored Dom 
Fernando for the throne, but their wives for- 
mally declared that thev would not pay their 
rt.'spects to a tailor's daughter. Friends of 
Dom Fernando tried to get him a secret di- 
vorce throiigli the Pope, but when he heard of 
it he refused the throne. The indirect conse- 
quences of this heroic, royal lover and husband 
was Iho Franco-Prussian war, the downfall of 
France and the loss oi her two important 
provinces, and the still uncertain political 
state in Spain." 



F. S. Wardwell, superintendent Street 
Railway company: These heavy, bliz- 
zardy snow stor-ns are tough on us. 
That one a week ago cost ub several hun- 
dred dollars. I didn't get to Ijed all 
night, and we had men out on horse- 
back at the boarding houses looking for 
laborers before 5 o'clock in the morning. 
We hired a very large gang at 92 per 
day. All those teams you have seen 
carting off snow on Superior street were 
in our pay. We have to get off enough 
to keep our tracks from drifting full and 
the other day took off 200 big loads. 
The city ought to clean off the biggest 
part, especially what is shoveled from 
the sidewalks, but we do most ot it. It's 
a little curiou3,but the month of Febru- 
ary our receipts usually drop off half, 
while the expenses keep right up to the 
top notch. I don't see why people do not 
travel in street cars in February, but 
thev don't, and I guess all business is 
quieter then than in any other month of 
the year. 

Unified wail of witnesses summoned 
by the grand jurj-: This way of doing 
business is all wrong. Some of us have 
been summoned and have been in con- 
stant attendance three days. No infor- 
mation can be had from either the 
county or assistant county attorney as 
to when we will be wanted, but we are 
simply told to wait. Surely some better 
system of telling men approximately the 
hour they'll be wanted could be intro- 
duced. 

Court house messenger boy: That 
order from the county commissioners 
about abstract messages is a dandy. 
Vou see, those abstract people have an 
all-fired lot of talking to do about deeds 
and instruments and many times 1 have 
to wait a quarter of an hour before I 
can get the 'phone to deliver a county 
officer's message on official business. It's 
tough on the 'stractors, but it's a needed 
reform. 

Chairman Wieland of the county com- 
missioners: No excuses are necessary. 
This is a public building, a public room 
and a public body is doing public busi- 
ness in it, and you are welcome to look 
over the records. A reporter is always 
welcome, and has a right to come here 
in the pursuit of his business. 

Col. Eaton: Just got back from a trip 
to New York. Havn't had a bit of snow 
down there this winter. All is mud and 
slush and rain. Most disagreeable 
weather I ever saw. This cold, crisp air 
is much to be preferred. Business is 
livening up in the East. I look to see 
big money coming this way soon. 

E. A. McNair: The Herald h;i8 im- 
proved so much as to make it by far the 
best paper at the head of the lakes. 

Hollenl>eck &. Long: The Herald is 
the brightest, most readable paper at 
the head of the lakes. Its features are 
very interesting and make it crisp and 
entertaining. The seen and heard col- 
umn is the best feature in the journal. 

George M. Smith, general agent North- 
western line: These rate wars are un- 
necessary evils. Railroads play a heavily- 
losing game every time a fight takes 
place. The public reaps the benefit, 
though. 

C. P. Flatley, agent Zenith City line: 
The Zenith City Short line will go as 
low as the lowest rate in this war. Du- 
luth will pay no more for Eastern travel 
than St Paul does. 

NIGHT. 



NOTED PEOPLE. 



When Robert Carter was a school 
teacher he taughc Schuyler Colfax to 
read Latin and Greek. 

Senator Blair of New Hampshire will 
present to congress a numerously signed 
petition for an appropriation for a statue 
of John Stark over that hero's grave at 
Manchester. 

All the noted personages in Europe 
except Gen. Boulanger have had the 
infiuenza. This one exception is sup- 
posed to be due to the fact that the 
general never succeeds in getting any- 
thing. 

Count Tolstoi, in hie apparent resolu- 
tion to live among and like common 
people, manages to get a gofxl deal of 
comfort, not to say luxury, out of it. 

Prince Bismarck is constantly improv- 
ing his estates and adding to the income 
which he receives from them. 

M. Pasteur is in very bad health. He 
has never regained his strength since 
he had such a serious illness two years 
ago. 

Gen. Mahone's son, now in New York, 
is a tall, slim young man not at all re- 
sembling his father. In fact, he is fully 
a foot t.iller than the general, and, it is 
to be hoped, lees ambitious. 

Dr. Alan us, the leading vegetarian of 
Berlin, has abandoned a purely vegeta- 
ble diet, as he finds that it causes chalky 
degeneration of the arteries. 

The controversy as to which of ♦wo 
houses in Bonn was the birthplace of 
Beethoven having been settled, the 
building to which the honor was ac- 
corded IS to be made a museum for the 
preservation of interesting and instruct- 
ive relics of the great composer. 

Secretary Noble is said to be "a gooo 
liver." He believes in taking care of his 
department of the interior. 

Rhoda Broughton lives at Oxford, in 
a rose embowered cottage, the idol of 
the Oxford students, for whom she gives 
Bohemian suppers. 



The Weather BuUetiu. 

Meteorological report received at 
Minn , H a. m. Jan 9, iseo. 



Duluth 



PLACES. 



29.661 

30 03 

SM.68 



Duluth 

Pt. Arthur. 
Winuipeg . 
St. Vincent 'JH.fiO 
Q'Appelle at.4« 
Assiuib'ne 2!t ."Ml 
Helena.. . -Ii.'.f-'; 
Huron.nak ,-*« 70 
St. Paul . . ai.TS 
La Cn.)S8e... Llt.ss 
Bismarck. ..ai.es 
Moorheal.. a».«2 



Bar.lTher. 
16 



04 

OB 

3D 

3« 
;»* 

U 
•32 
•M 

28 
U 



Wind 



NE 
NW 
E 

S 

sw 

sw 
sw 

s 

SB 

S 

w 

S 



Uain 



.06 
.02 
.16 
.06 
.01 



Weather 



< loudy 

Snow 

Snow 

Cloudless 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Cloudless 

P't Cloudy 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudy 



T In mln i^)liiinn Indicates trace One (I) 
Inch of niin or melte<^l snow equal.4 ten (10) in- 
ches of snowfall. Minus (— ) in temperature 
column indicates below zen>. 

w. H. Fallon, 

Senreaot Signal Corps 

WASHrNCTON, Jan. Q.— Forecast for 
twenty-four hours, ending 8 a. m. to 
morrow: For North Dakota: Local 
snoMs, southerly shift ing to westerly 
winds; warmer Thursday, colder on 
Friday. For South Dakota : Warmer, 
fair, southtresterly irinds: For Minne- 
sota: Local snows in northern, fair in 
southern portion, generally wanner; 
witids shifting to southwesterly. 



IBy Ada Iddings Gale.] 

The meadow fades into the dark. 
The wind U hushed and still. 

We cannot see, we only hear 
Where flows the meadow rill. 

In the thick boughs the rustling wings 
Tell where the nests are hid. 

The shrill, sweet argument begins 
Of wh;ther Katy did. 

O'er head one star, large, limpid, bright. 

As sentinel doth stand 
O'er all the heaven's wide expanse. 

O'er all the ilrowsy lan d. 

AMONG STATE EDITORS. 



THE P.OUTICAL ONLOOKER. 



A great many Rices Point residents are put- 
ting forward iheir best efforts to have August 
Butxjlz announce himself as a candidate for 
the mayoralty, but although Mr. Bubolz Is 
immensely popular there, it is not believed 
he will be induced to make the canvass. Even 
if lie should he would not stand tho slightest 
chance of winning even the nomination. 

* * # 
I hear the name of E. S. Palmer, the archi- 
tect, mentioned as an aldcrmanlc candidate 
from the J^ecoml ward. Mr. Palmer is an excel- 
lent man. keen and wideawake and would be 
a goo<l alderman, if he was elected. I don't 
know that he Is confessedly a candidate. One 
only objection could possibly l)e urged, he has 
lived in Duluth but three years; still some men 
can learn more of a town and do more good in 
a year than others can in twenty, ami Palmer 
is one of that class. 

* * * 
J. P. Johnson's name is prominently and 

very favorably mentioned as a candidate tor 
the mayoralty, and should he run he would hv 
strong. "He would have the support of all 
classes except the lower and would bo by far 
the best man for the office who9f> name I have 
yet heard," said a prominent leiral citizen this 
mornlny. "Perkey" has been county treas- 
urer for nearly three terms aud has done well. 
His record has been clean, but it Is understood 
that he will not, under any circumstances, run 
for his county place another term. 
« * * 
"If the parties who are makin? such a pala- 
ver about John B.-utphin'sbeluu' so anxious as 
U) who will Ije the next mayor 
worried their beads as little over 
the matter as the mayor him8«'lf, 
they wouldn't Io-hj much sleep," said a gentle- 
man this morning. "Sutphin is ready to step 
down and out, and how the election goes will 
not havR any serious effect upon hiro, no mat- 
ter what the result." 



Red Wing Republican: An absurd 
Washington rumor has it that the Presi- 
dent shot a hog by mistake. Heatwole, 
with his eye on Minneapolis, wearily 
sighs that he has not shot any, but ap- 
pointed one — one more. 

Mankato Free Press: The question 
arises, would whit« men under the same 
circumstances be any better than are 
negroes in the South? One thing is cer- 
tain, the forbearance and spirit shown 
by the negroes in that South Carolina 
county after the cowardly massacre of 
their fellows showed that the negroes 
have those virtues. Give the negro his 
due. 

Hastings Gazette: It is reported that 
ex-Senator Sabin has camped in Wash- 
ington fur the purpose of defeating C. 
B. Buckman as surveyor-general. Treach- 
ery while acting as manager of the 
former's campaign is alleged. 

Fergus Falls Journal: The pastors of 
the churches in this city have cause for 
complaint at the light attendance at 
churcli. Few small cities have as able 
preachers as Fergus, or more popular 
pastors, but tho people fail to turn out. 
There are in Fergus Falls and vicinity 
3000 people who are connected with one 
of the five .\merican churches, but less 
than 20 per cent of that number are 
found in church, and after a week's work 
the minister delivers his thoughts to 
empty pews. Sunday morning, the first 
Sunday in the new year, there were 536 
people at church. 

.state Items. 

The Pioneer Press has been awarded 
the city printing of St. Paul. 

Bishop Cotter was oresented with a 
purse of $1,500 at Winona. 

The state superintendent of public 
instructions has completed tables show- ! 
ing the results of the final e.xaminations • 
of the state high schools for the year 
ending July 31, 1889. The whole num- 
of pupils enrolled was 3il0. 

The Otter Tail county bar held its 
annual meeting at Fergus Fa'ls, fol- 
lowed by a banquet at the Grand hotel. 
E. E. Corlif s was elected president. The 
Lind bill regarding federal courts was 
strongly recommended. 

Judge J. P. Williams of Fergus Falls, 
has been reappointed railroad commis- 
sioner for three years. 

Leonard Conrad, proprietor of the 
Albion hotel at East St. Cloud, Minn., 
died of pneumonia, induced b the grip. 

The city council of Winona, Minn., 
has voted in favor of a wagon bridge 
across the Mississippi at that point. 



Any kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms. 

We have the best 50-foot corner lot 
on Michigan street, for sale cheap; one 
third cash, balance on five years' time. 
D. H. Stf.venson & Co., 

43 Exchange building. 

"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

Poor Humanity! 

The common lot is one of sorrow eay 
— at least— the pessimists, they who 
look a1 the worst side. Certainly what 
would otherwise be a bright existence, 
is often overshadowed by some ailment 
that hangs it like a pall, obscuring 
perf)etually the radiance that else would 
light the path. Such an ailment, and a 
very common one, is nervousness, or in 
other words, wnakneM of ilie nervous 
system, a condition only irremi>diable 
where ineflicient or improper meatus are 
taken to relieve it. The concurrent ex 
perience of nervous people who have 
persistently used Hostetters Stomacl 
Bitters is, that it conquers entirely su 
persensitivenesB of the nerves, as well as 
diseases— so called — which are invited 
and sustained by their chronic weak 
ness. As the nerves gain stamina from 
the great tonic the trouble disappears 
Use the bitters for malaria, rheumatism, 
billiousnes?! and kiJiiev troubles. 



8 lots in Il.iirison'ir, East Endion, in- 
cluding two double corners, very cheap 
and on easy terms. This must Oe sold 
this week. 

D. H. Stevenson & Co., 

43 Exchange building. 

Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Room D, Hunter 
block. 



Money in any Amonnts, 

Lowest rate of interest; no delay. 

JONE.S & Brace. 



The members of the St. Jean Baptiste 
society are requested to meet at their 
meeting hall. Odd Fellows hall, with re- 
galia, to take part in the procession in 
honor of the arrival of his lordship, 
Bishop McGolrick, on Thursday, the 
9th inst., at 6 p. m. By order, 

Michael Ockllette, 

Acting President. 



6 PER CENTI 



We have at command unlimited 
amounts of money to lend promptly 
at 6 percent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



In order to give everybody a chance 
to participate in the benefits of ourgreat 
holiday reduction sal*', I have decided 
to continue it for tlie balance of this 
month. Don't miss the opportunity to 



August, 1888, the last appropriation was I get reliable goods at away-do« n prices 
made for this great national work; but SaJ*:' closes positively Friday, Jan. 31. 
the subsequent failure to pass the river ' Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

Iloes Experience Count? 

It does, m every line of business, and 
especially in compounding and preparing 
medicines. This is illustrated in the 
great superiority of Hood's Sarsaparilla 
over other preparations, as shown hy the 
remarkable cures it has accomplished. 

The head of the firm of C. I. Hood & 
Co. IS a thoroughly competent and ex- 
perienced pharmacist, having devoted 
his whole life to the study and actual 
preparation of medicines. He is also a 
member of the Massachusetts and Am 
erican Pharmaceutical associations, and 
continues actively devoted to supervis- 
ing the preparation of and managing 
the business connected with Hood's 
Sarsaparilla. 

Hence the superiority and peculiar 
merit of Hood's Sarsaparilla is built 
upon the ni'jst substantial foundation. 
In its preparation there is represented 
all the knowledge which modern rosoarch 
ill mexlical science has developed, com- 
bined with long exfierience, brain -work 
and experiment. It is only necessary to 
give this medicine a fair trial to realize 
its great curative value. 



Loans Made on Unimproved Pfopert(. 



Dyspepsia 

Makes the lives of many people miserable, 
causing distress after eating, aour stomach, 
Blck beadaobe, beartbum, losa of appetite, 
a taint, "all gone "feeling, bad taste, coated 
— I ^ tongue, and Irregularity of 

'''**'^"" the bowels. Dyspepsia does 
After °ot K^t well of itself. It 
Pntln<y requires canAiI attenUon, 
Kaxing and a remedy like Hood's 
Sarsaparilla, which acts gently, yet efficiently. 
It tones the stomach, regulates the diges- 
tion, creates a good ap- eiok 
petite, banishes headache, JL . 
and refreshes the mind. HOadachO 
" I have been troubled with dyspepsia. I 
bad but Uttle appetite, and wtiat I did eat 
Heart" distressed mo, or did me 

DUrn would have a laint or tired, 
all-gone feeling, as though I liad not eaten 
anything. My trouble was afgr^vated by 
my business, painting. Last e^, . 
spring I took Hood's Bar- »OUr 
saparilla, which did me an StomaCh 
immense amount of good. Jt gave ine an 
appetite, and my food relished and satisfied 
the craving I liad previously experienced." 
Georoe a. Page, Watertowa, Mass. 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

Bold by nil dniRt^sts. Jl ; six for gj. Prepared only 
by C. I. HOOD * CO., AiK)theoari«s, Lowell, Ma»«. 

lOO Doses One Dollar 



REAL ESTATE. 



SPECIAL LIST 



—OF- 



BARGAINS 



«ftPPy NEW yEllR, 

The Season of Grand 
Resolves and Sol- 
emn Vows. 



All of Which is Well in Its 

Way, but Practice is 

the Thing. 



You Can All 
You Try, 

Better Try 



"Get There" 
so You ha I 



if 



OFFBRKD Br 



C. E. RICHARDSON, 



Acreage on the hill, just bacic of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half Interest In this forty 
acres can be had for $62,000 

80 AcreE at West End, near Brook- 
dale Division 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior I 50 

1 Acres In the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 

The best bargain offered now is stock In the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate ot profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Ouluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 

C. E. RICHARDSON, 

326 West Superior Street. 
WEST DULUTHI 

MACFAIILAIIE & AUSIIIi'S 

SPECIAL LIST. 

Good pair on Fourth avenue, $1400, 
if taken soon. 

Dwellings near Car works and Iron 
Bay works for rent cheap. 

Good house and lot in Fifth division, 
$ I 200. 

Two lots on Grand (paved part), 
$4000. 

Good pair on Central (paved part), 
$5500. 

Best lots in Clinton and Car, ton 
Place, $300. 

A good lot in Hunters Grassy Point 
First division, $300. 

A triple corner on Main street and 
First avenue, $2400. 

If you will sell your property at a 
reasonable figure, pleas', call, or write 
us about i1 immediately. 

Correspondence solicited, maps and 
any information cheerfully furnished. 
Loans and insurance carefully j,nd 
promptly attended to. 

MACFARLANE & AUSTIN, 

West Duluth. 



COFFm k WARNER, 

*) FAKGUSSON BUtCK. 

80 Acres, section 9-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 33-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-50- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15. 

All below the market. 
COFFIN & WARNER. 



W. C. SHERWOOD k CO., 

REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVE OKNCIKK BA.KaAI^S IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

(a dlflc part« of the city aoii 
ACRE PFOPERTY ADJOINING. 

All we ask Is for \ rtlestoexamlneourtlst and 

compare them rlth other prices before 

buying. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood & Co., 

J. D. & R. CrRAY, 

REAL ESTATE. 



ROOM "B, 



HUNTER BLOCK. 



R. C. GHIDLBY. 



J. C. MI8HLKH 



GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 

Real Estate Brokers 

Room 2ti, Bxcbai'gc Bulldlnnr. 
List your property witb usat i»hat Itls worth 
and wt) will sell ll. We Invite everybtKly to 
call In and see us. and willcit O'jrrtsspoudence 



BUILDING LOANS A SPECIALTY. 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTGAGES 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONOS BOUGHT. 



cuii;y[ i PRiiioLE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 
Duluth National Bank Building. 



lUIONEY TO LOAN IN 
■''* sums on Duluth 
Estate at 6 1-2, 7 and 
cent. No delay. 

JULIUS D. HOWARD, 
Room 3, - - Mil'or Block 



ALL 

Real 

8 per 




<fc Q r n Best Set 
90 •v.' W—of Tooth. 



GULLUM, 

Painle»8 Dentist. 



Kooni 1-;, 4Wi West Superior Street, 
FarruHson niot^h. Duluth 



GREAT EN6LISB 

Murray's Specific. 

TJ^^oMcfV- A. g'uarantei cure for all uer 
voue disease such as Weal' 
Memory, Losa ISralu Power, 
Hysteria, He^laohe, Pain In the 
Baok, Nervous Prostration, 
Lfui-orrhoea, lTnIvei"8al L.iflSl- 
tado, Semiual Weakness, Iuiiki- 
l«jncy and (reueral loss of power 
of the Generative Orgrans;— In 
^ — oither eejt, cauhed by Indlfcre- 
IflhwTlUaC* ti"D orovtrr t^.vi rtion,and which 
ulilmatelv lead to Premature TradaXaA. 
Old Age. Insanity and Consump- 
tion. iLlNJ or a liox or six boxes 
for 16.00. Sent by mall on re- 
ceipt of . price. Pull partlcalars 
in pamphlet, sent free to every 
applicant. We Ua»r»ut«t) Six 
Bozeit to cure any case. For 
ever> 16.00 order received, we 
Bend six boxes, with a written 
guarantee to refund the °"J"ey»f»«« 
if our Specific does not etTeot a cure. Addretii! 
8ii onmmunlcatl')ns to the «ole manufacturer? 
THK MCKRAY MKDIOINBOO. 
Kanau Citv, Mo 
Mold In Onlath by Mas WIrth 





rTaklac* 

Addresd 



THE NEW YEAR'S LEAF. 

IChlcagt) Herald. J 
Just now is the time when the averafre man 
Begrlns to prosi>ei;tivcl.\ nioutaliy plan. 
As the annual swoariuir offst^ason draws near. 
Of the leaf he'll turn over the tlrst of the year. 
KverythiuKthat is wrou(j from his life he'U 

efface, 
And uauKht that's unjust in his tlioughts have 

a place. 
He's sure he has power all evil to shun 
When he saj's so aud so then the business is 

done. 
But. in order to have his new plan broken in. 
He'd better not tarry a day to be«rin. 
And 'tis best be should not use the leaves too 

fast. 
Why not employ this year the leaf turned for 

laHt? 

Here we are the first of a new 
year as bright and happy as 
children with new toys. You 
have just closed up the record 
of the year I 889, and we sin- 
cerely hope the balance is in 
your favor— "by a large major- 
ity." If your expectations 
were not fully realized, we are 
very sorry indeed, and trust 
you will not think us too famil- 
iar if we commiserate with you. 
Well, never mind, don't feel 
badly because you failed to 
make the most of your oppor- 
tunities, for it can't be helped 
now. Recollect that there is 
no teacher in the world whose 
lessons are so impressive as 
Old Mother Experience. It is 
an easy thing to look back and 
see where you missed it, and 
then, too, in looking back at 
these bad breaks it seems so 
strange that you didn't' know 
better. "Why," you say to 
yourself, "anyone who is half 
witted ought to have known 
better." That is true, but 
again we suggest that it does 
no good to harrow up your feel- 
ings in that way. The new 
year is spread out before you 
like a new blank book, all un- 
written. As the days go by 
the pages will be filled, one by 
one, and when the year is end- 
ed the volume will be closed 
and put away in your archives, 
and you will commence again. 
Since you commenced making 
up the book just closed, we put 
one of the finest pieces of 
suburban property on the mar- 
ket anywhere about Duluth; 
and simply because we offered 
lots at extremely low prices 
and on the .people's easy pay- 
ment plan, a good many inno- 
cent and honest persons sup- 
posed that it was all a humbug 
and a cheat. We can't much 
blame them for jumping at the 
conclusion that it was outside 
farm land, instead of fine resi- 
dence property, because our 
prices were so low and our 
terms so favorable. But that 
.is where many of you made a 
PAD mistake. Had you inves- 
tigated, you would have invest- 
ed, and so made money. But 
you can make amends for that 
this year. Now, in strict confi- 
dence (which we beg of you 
not to repeat), we will tell you 
something: Water works, sew- 
ers and electric lights will be 
put in at Lakeside, Lester Park 
and Crosley Park, a system of 
parks and boulevards laid out, 
hundreds of fine new houses 
and comfortable homes built, 
suburban train service greatly 
improved— although it is ex 
cellent now—and the whole 
face of affairs changed. Lots 
that now sell for $125 each 
will then bring $250; lots that 
now sell for $200 will readily 
sell at $400, and so on. It is 
hard to understand how people 
who feel assured that all this 
great growth is so near at hand 
should wait. The way to make 
money is to get ahead of the 
crowd and buy before the ma- 
jority of people do, and before 
the developments occur Now, 
if you want to start out the new 
year right and make a record 
with which you will be satis- 
fied, take our advice and buy 
lots in Crosley Park, and buy 
NOW. If you wan't to make 
your money go as far as possi- 
ble, and thus make the utmost 
with it, buy what you can reach 
on the easy payment plan and 
keep up your weekly instal- 
ments, and you will be delight- 
ed with the results. Remem- 
ber, you will have no interest 
to pay, and that makes quite 
a difference. 

Hoping that you will do your- 
self a kindness by following 
our advice, and wishing you all 
a most happy and prosperous 
new year— and many succeed- 
ing ones— we beg leave to sub- 
scribe ourselvt s 

Your real(ty) friends, 

C. [. LOM 4 CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. 




DR. GICO. «. HATCOCK. 



FRIMT AND SATURDAY, 

JAN'Y 10 and 




ej?/ Soaps of n/^irjykiQas, 

" ?y^oap5diie wade for 5i?ow;' 
Bi.tnoi?edrel)?ene, 
b te Santa 

ifisTHEBEST 

Ifyoawajtyour 

V^SHING, 
^DCRUBBING. 
SCOURING a^TcL 

Cleaning 

vi^it eajy, u;e SAfJiA Claus Soap^ 

AN3 PONT YO U FORGET IT fl! 

MADE ONLY BY 

MKRviRBANK & Cb.-^ Chicago: 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TEVIPLE OPERA. 



Manitger 



Two Nights and Grand- Satur- 
day Matinee. 



I I 



Stetson's Big Spectacular 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 



COMPANY. 



Big Double Brass Band and Orchestral Two 
Marks I Two Topseysl Thrilling; Ice Scene I 
Genuin! Cotton Picking Scenel Grand Trans- 
format on at the close of the performance, 
Uncle 1 om's vision of Eva In Heaven. 

Incldxntal to the drama the following pleas- 
ing specialties will appear: Stetson's Famous 
Lone 8 ar Quartet; the Original African Man- 
Ooiin 8 udents; Kersand's Jubilee Singers. 

Grand Street Parade at noon. 

Salecf seatss open Thursday morning, Jan. 0. 



Trices Reduced to 75c, 50c and 35c. 



PEdPLES THEATER. 



DULUTH, 



JOHN 8. BARNES. Mgr. 



Ttie Best Varietj Show in the Horthwest 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 15 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



N.^ 


HUGO &. CO., 


iiT3Tria.A.iTCE. 


K'XIM 10, 


MeTKOPOLITAS UL.UCIL. 
TELEPHONE 242. 



Cleaned, 



QSTRICH FEATHERS 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned 



HUNTER, 106 Second St. East. 



WANTS, fflli m, ETC 



ONE CENT A WORD IN ADVANCE. 



Advertiseiueuls uuder this bead received at 
the lollowiujf piiux's, besides the busiuutid ot- 
tlce ot I be Heiaid : 

Kiidion I'ltariuacy, 127 Tenth avenue east. 

Itoyce &. Toliuan, corner Fourth avenue 
and Superior stn^et west. 

J. \V. Neliiun, No. IJSUl, eorner Eigbtoeutb 
avenue west and Superior Blroel. 

li. Johutiou, chief clerk Phillips hotel. West 
Duluth. 



.Situations Wanted. 

NTED— Situation clerking' or wrltinjr— 



W lady. J. U M. 



Help Wanted. 

IITANTEU— A cook for a small family. 
T T quire, 3* East Secoud street. 



la 



WANTKD-A ifood ^Irl for g>;neral house- 
work at Lakeside; wages, *li9 per month. 
Apply liooni 16, Fii-st National itauk buUUiug. 

WANTED-A good cook and housekeeper 
at 'AS> East First street. Cali at once. 




Tl.is week, commenciEig JAN. 6, 

FONDAS' 




OF STUBS! 



1 WISH to employ u lew ladies on satarv to 
take charjfe of my business at their homes. 
LiKht. very taseiuutiiig uud bealthtui Wajfes 
*lo per weeit. Kefeifuce K'veu. (jood pay lor 
uari time. Address with sta.mp, Mr<i. Mariou 
Wallier, Louisville, K.y. 

7" ANTED — Competent girl lor general 
housework, 14uu Ueucb street. 

WANTED— A girl for geucral bouse work; 
family of ihi^ee. CaU In foreaoon, 411 
Ninth avenue east. 



\v 



ADMISSION: 



TEN CENTS ! TEN CENTS ! 



Performance commences at 8 p. m. sharp. 



THREE 



ACREAG 



ESargains 



SALA Wi, WO ex}>enses in advauoe, 
allowed eaeh uiouth. Steadi' em- 

pluymeut at home or traveliut^. No sulieiunif. 

Dulles deliverinif aud makiuff coliocUons No 

postal o.irds. Address with stamp, Ualer ti 

Co., I'iqua, Ohio. 

WANTED— At the Womans Employment 
Bureau, -11 z^uperior (street east, two 
secoud tfiils and a Uoxeu girls lor geueral 
I house work. Kmpioymeut obtained tree oi 
cost. Mrs. A. It. Ayers. 



tor .Sale. 

i"^OK SALE— A heavy working team chiap 
at A. W. Eiler's iM Lake avenue south. 

Ij^OK SALE— My residence with 60 or 100 feel 
' at Jla Eaet ^euuud street. Terms to suit 
purchaser. E. A. Gilt>ert, Xi Board of Trade. 

1r>OR SALE — At a bargain, nine-roomed 
' house wuh lot i')Xi4o. Price tliCo; *6u0 
cash, balauce ou terms to suit purcha-er. For 
further particulars call at room 21L Fasioret- 
Meuson building. 

FOK SALE— House aud lot, Siaiu; . *ioO down 
the remainder ou terms satisfactory to 
the purchaser. This is a geu.jiue bargiiiu. 
Uoum 'HI, Pasioret-Stensou buildiug. 

HEAVV U(JK»ES FOK SALE— lo bead of 
bc-av> huises, raised at Lake Fiitk. on 
the Northern Facille road, lor sale by C. W. 
liarvey. Can .x; seeu at Uowaru barn, ou the 
lake shore, Mionesoia point. Kesideuc-e, 'SSi 
West Fourth street. 




> |i 



Wanted — To Trade. 

WANTED— A five, ten or iweutj-acre tract 
worth, say, *luOu or sl3Uo. Will give the 
best fifty fool corner in Hall's additiou for 
same. What have you to offer? Wi.liam H. 
Coote, Crawfordsville, Ark. 



For Kent. 

FOK RENT— Desirable room: bath, ^as, 
steam, etc. ; private I'amii}'. Address S.. 
Herald ollioe. 



If taken at once. 



WANTED -A furnUhed house for the win 
ter. L. J. Taussig, No. 9 Fhoenli block 



Financial. 

LTiUTH MOUTGAGN LOAN COMPANY 



D 



Land situated near 




L 




ture, pianos, horses aud wagous witiiout re- 
moval from owner's possession: also ou ware- 
house leceipts, bank stocks, and auy property 
ol value; uotes discouute .; partial payments 
received aud your owu lime gniuied tor pay- 
2<eat; uo delay; money on baud and furnished 
immediately after security is approved. Wm. 
Uorkan, Manager, Uuum 12, Fargusson block, 
Duluth, Miuu. 



IF YOU- WISH TO SELL OB BUY DULLTU 
or Superior bank stock, coriKiralion or in- 
vestment securities, call ou or address B. Mur- 
phiu. broker, 9 Uauniug block, Duluth, Minn. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

-Vf H. WILSON, ATTOHNEY AND OOUN- 

iA • seller at Law. Will practice in State 
aud L uited States Courts. All business given 
iirompt atteutiou, 4t Fargusson Block. Duluth, 
Miuu. 



-THE— 



Greatest Snaps 



In the market. 



TJLASTERINO. 

H, T. DINHAM. 

All kinds of plastering done, 
promptly attended to. ciHcc, room 
ter block. 



f\' 



*^ 



Jobbing 
D, UuD- 



M 



RS. J. 8. DINWOODIE, 



Teacher of Piano Foi tc. Voice and Slgbt Slngr- 
lug. Chorus and Choir Couductor. 

Music rooms at J J. Wiggios'ft, 16 Bast 8u 
perior street, aud at rosideiioe, 121 Tenth ave. K 



>«aa^ 



M 



K. H. PARKER ROBINSON. 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION, 
8 MLLES BLOCK. 



ADDRESS 



r. H. 



BOX A A, DULUTH, MINN 



McMILLEN At STEBBINS, AUCdlTBCTB 
and 8ui>erinteni1outa. Oflioo, room No. 

— , Kzohauge building. 



L>ALMER tt HALL, AUCHITECTS AND 
Superinteiident«.ro.jm 1«, Excbanjre build- 
i'lg. liiiiiirh. Mint! K. S. Palmer, L. P. Hall 



Great JYench remedy. Dr, LkDdc'S pkr- 

iodical 1-1LL8, from Paris. Prance, actonly on 
the generative organs in females and posi- 
tively cures suppression of menses (from what- 
ever cause), and all periodical troubles pecu- 
liar to women. A safe, reliable remedy, war- 
ranttid to excite meustruaiion or money re- 
funded. Should not beusedduringpregnancy. 
The large propiirtiou of the ills to which ladies 
are subject is the direct result of a disordered 
and irregular menstruation. Robt. Stevenson 
& Co., 1 hlcago, HI., H. lioewarth & Co., Mil- 
waukee. Wholesale Agts. The genuine only 
•upplled by Boyoe * ^Kxjnan, 8ofe Agti., Du- 



i 

r 

I 

/ 





m 



l\l IMM . 1X151' ■' ^' 



•4^= T^-r a r - ■ . Ki . 



ff 



i 



/i 



-=«^ 



> 



/ 






I 

\ 






li 




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V 



Considerable Information on a 

Matter of Local 

Moment. 




V U Li UTll K V icri Ul » 



May Go to the Interior 
Possibly to 
Vermilion. 



Lakes 



or 



About 20,000 Tons the Local 

Demand; New York 

Famine. 



The cold wavas of iate have been so 
late and so few that not only do the 
coal men mourn, but there are grave 
apprehensions among the ice dealers 
that their usual bounteous crop may be 
hard to get. 

And there would appear to be ground 
for appreheasiou, as there is at this date 
not the least formation of ice on the 
lake excepting a thin crust on the south 
8ide a few feet from the shore. The lake 
is as sparkling and placid as on a mid- 
summer day, and unless the tempera- 
ture drops down and stays down for a 
while, cold drinks next summer will be 
a delicacy entirely beyond the reach of 
any except the comparatively alHuent. 
There is plenty of ice of fair thickness in 
the bay, but this cannot be used for 
domestic consumption or for any but 
storage and cooling purposes. 

Under any circumstances about 20,000 
tons of ice for consumption in the city 
will have to be procured somehow and 
somewhere, even if there isn't an inch 
of frozen surface on ttie lake. The fol- 
lowing will show how it will be, divided 
among the ditferent ice retailing hrms 
and packing houses: 

Tons. 

MoDii^haii j^ Co 4,iMi 

St. Geriiiuiu J£ Han a,4uo 

WUliUui Meier l.iUkt 

Eof c End Ice ttrin J,(.h.kj 

J.B.>utpliiu -i.owi 

A. t'ittfcr JS Co 2,50U 

iiuluiti Packintf company J.uoo 

Armour i'lu.-kiuif couipauy iidu 

Others l.umi 

Booth & Sons 2,j(iu 



Total If.ooo 

Then there will be several small lots of 
ice put up by private parties which will 
easily bring the total cut up to 20,000 
tons. The tirst tive tirms on the fore- 
going list will be obliged to have clear 
ice, as they supply private families and 
doOiestic consumption. The remainder 
can easily secure their supply, as it is 
only for cooling and storage. Conse- 
quently the trepidation comes from the 
local dealers. If the lake does not freeze 
— and there seems to be a reasonable 
probability that it won't — it will be- 
come necessary to get a supply from 
some of the outlying lakes, of which there 
are several within a radius of ten miles. 
There is a question whether it would 
not be more economical to have the ice 
shipped from Luke Vermilion, by rail. 

It may be, as a prominent ice dealer 
remarked m The Herald yesterday, that 
unless ice can be cut from the lake it is 
possible that it may have to be hauled 
from some interior lake or from the bay 
a mile or two below the canal. There 
are others intending to put up large 
quantities of ice who profess to have no 
fear but that tiiere will be plenty of 
good ice, even if the lake does not freeze 
for a month or so. This statement is 
borne out by A. Fitger i Co., proprietors 
of the Lake Superior brewery. They 
sa, that ice did not form on the lake 
last year until Feb. 7, and that 
after that date they cut and 
housed 1-jOO tons of tine, clear 
ice, eighteen to twenty inches thick. 
This year they intend cutting fully 
1000 tons more than last year. An in- 
teresting item in this connection is the 
fact that this is the last time Fitger &, 
Co. intend to cut ice, having closed a 
contract for an ice-making machine of 
twenty-four tons a day capacity. They 
will utilize this machine, not for the 
manufacture of ice, but to cool the rooms 
where the seductive and exhilarating 
lager is stored. In this way they econo- 
mize a large amount of space. 

Unless Minnesota's matchless climate 
comes to the rescue and entices the 
festive Manitoba wavelets to toy with 
the bosom of Duluth's natural sea 
and congeal its ample surface, 
it is very probable that the ice dealers 
may have to go out of business. Or 
better, they might burst up the present 
ice trust, buy a mammoth ice machine 
and go to manufacturing that desirable 
commodity. If such a calamity should 
befall the city, that its ice crop is in the 
soup, there would be distress in many 
lines of trade. In view of this condition 
of things the icemen may well commis- 
Berate each other and wonder what the 
end will be. 

From the fact that the lake did not 
freeze last year until the 7th of Feb- 
ruary, there is a reasonable prospect 
there there may be sutScient 
cold to make ice. The latest 
report from the weather office 
does not carry any such encourage- 
ment: it is as follows: Local, foreca8t,for 
the next twenty-four hours, warmer 
weather with snow. 



At New Vurk, Too. 

New York, Jan. !>.— The supply of ice 
in this city and within a reasonable 
refich is not sufficient to till an ordinary 
winter demand for three weeks. • The 
mild w^ealher has increased the usual 
winter consumption fully 40 per cent. 
Plenty of old-fashioned zero weather 
within two weeks is all that can save an 
ice famine. Boston is as badly off as 
New York, und some dealers there sent 
over here a day or two ago to see if New 
York had any reserves which they might 
draw upon. No ice to speak of has yet 
been cut in Maine, so the old crop is the 
only resource. Icemen from Hudson 
are very much disconsolate. 



AN IMPORTA NT C ONNECTION. 

The Rail Rout« From th« East of the 
Lttke Shore Road. 

The Milwaukee, J ^e Shore & West- 
em road now claims to have the short- 
est transcontinental route, sixty-four 
miles less distance between the East and 
Northwest than any other. A few days 
ago the road secured right of way 
through Manitowoc to the lake, from 
which port lx>at lines will make connec- 
tion with Luddington. The new route 
is via the Delaware, Lackawana & 
Western from New York to Buffalo, 
then over the Urand Trunk and the 
Flint & Pere Marquette, connecting 
with the Lake Shore at S'ew London. 
St. Paul connection is made over the 
Green Bay & Winona road. 

To Duluth the Lake Shore comes 
over the Northern Pacific from Ashland. 
The traffic arrangement of these roads is 
one of the moat important ever made, 
and presents a new and important factor 
in rate questions. 



A Coruer in tutllon. 
The cheapest corner in this division; 
gas and water; graded avenue; street 
car: Short line; great bargain. 

Joj(E.s & Bhace. 



PROBLEM OF GOV ERNMENT. 

Hon. Seth Low COutiuiies Uin UiHCourHe 

OD tlie Subject, 

[The Herald publi.-'hes below a third 
installment of the address of Hon. Seth 
Low of Brooklyn, to the students of 
Johns Hopkins university. In view of 
the interest awakened in Duluth over 
municipal government and the future of 
this city, the matter will be of interest. 
It will be continued from day to day 
till completed.) 

Another element seriously affecting 
the problem of city government in the 
United States is, that all improvement 
of administration in American cities is 
to be wrought out upon the basis of 
manhood suffrage. ' While not conceal 
uig from ourselves the peculiar difficult- 
ies imparted to the problem by this fact, 
especially where it applies to contmu- 
aliy increasing numbers of citizens from 
abroad, who come to us out of condi- 
tions in which they have had no oppor- 
tunity to develop themselves in tbu art 
of self-government, it is nevertheless im- 
portant for us to remember that the 
other special difficulties already alluded 
to, which confront .\meriuan cities, are 
sufficient to strain to liie utmost any 
system of city government anywhere de- 
vised. If, therefore, it is in cities that 
our American institutions appear to the 
most disadvantage, the whole fault is by 
no means to be attributed to the fac' 
that manhood suffrage prevails in them. 
For this is to be said in behalf of man- 
liood suffrage: it Americanizes our 
foreign-born citizens more rapidly than 
any otner system possibly could. 

Hence it happens that our cities are 
not full of immense masses of men w^ho 
have no mterest in them, of any kind 
whatever. Their interest, under exist- 
ing conditions, may be an unintelligent 
interest, but it is very real. As far as it 
goes, it IS as genuine, speaking broadly, 
as that of tne native-born. Manhood 
suffrage leads more rapidly than any 
other system to the education of the 
masses. It leads to their education, 
both by the awakening effect of partici- 
pation in our political affairs, and also 
oy the willingness to be taxed for edu- 
cational purposes, which it fosters and 
developj in every community. It is not 
at all clear that the marked ability in 
many directions shown by American 
cities to provide for their own rapid 
growth is not largely due to the preval- 
ence of manhood suffrage. Manhood 
suffrage infuses into the body politic the 
element that feels, as well as the ele- 
ment that thinks. It is open to great 
doubt whether the property owners fo 
any city, left to themselves, would have 
provided for the necessities springing 
from the rapid growth of our cities, as 
well as these necessities have been pro- 
vided for, as matter of fact. 

The experience of the state of New 
York in its efforts to care for the insane 
is suggestive upon this point. When 
the Willard asylum was established, the 
act provided that all the insane within 
the state should be cared for by the 
state. Almost every year since then it 
has become necessary to exempt this or 
that county from the provisions of this 
act, for the reason that the state legisla- 
ture could not be made to comprehend, 
for a moment, the necessity for the large 
outlays demanded in the localities where 
the population was growing most 
rapidly. As a consequence, the duty of 
caring for their own insane was devolved 
upon these localities, for the simple rea- 
son that these who did not feel the need 
could not believe that it existed. Simi- 
larly, it is open to doubt whether any of 
our cities would have met 
the demands upon them of 
their own great growth, if the 
expenditures of the city had been regu- 
lated altogether by the taxpayers. These 
feel the outlay; they are not so apt to 
feel the need which necessitates the out- 
lay. 

Meanwhile, there are two views con- 
cerning manhood suffrage, both of which, 
in their extreme statement, are the 
source of much harm. The view of the 
average man is apt to be that whatever 
all the people do at any given moment 
is the best possible thing to be done. 
This sanguine optimism prevents all ef- 
fective struggle towards a higher ideal. 
Against this it is certainly right to place 
the dictum of Sir Henry Maine, that 
popular governments, like all others, 
must be tested by results. On the other 
hand, scholars and men of wealth are 
apt to fall into the other extreme view 
of believing that universal suffrage is 
the source of all our woes, and that, es- 
pecially in cities, it makes the problem 
hopeless. Such a view as this paralyzes 
every effort for improvement by taking 
the heart out of it at the start. The 
first requisite, therefore, for improving 
city government in the United States is 
a profound belief on the part of the peo- 
ple, first, that the city government needs 
to be improved, and second, that it can 
be improved, under conditions actually 
prevailing in this countrj-. My own ex- 
perience, as the mayor of a large city for 
four years, leads me to approach the 
question in precisely this spirit, and 
strong in just this faith. 

[To be continued.] 



WORK AT WEST DULUTH. 



The Progress at the Car 

Works; Daily Output 

For a Time. 



At Other 
the 



Factories; 

Day From 

West End. 



News 

the 



of 



Tomorrow is payday at the Minnesota 
Iron Car company's shops. Although 
only about a quarter of the ultimate 
force is yet employed the works will pay 
tomorrow considerably over $10,000 for 
the month of December. January's 
payroll will not be less than 815,000. At 
the company's offices today the force is 
very busy. Five more cars are finished 
at the Car works tonight and are start- 
ing on their trip to Columbus, where 
they will go into use. Ten cars are 
in the erecting shops partly fin- 
ished and the output for a 
week or two now will average three or 
four cars a day. At the end of that time 
the output will be considerably increased 
and will keep on increasing steadily and 
surely. The company has already 
booked 3ontracts for several thousand 
cars and will get them out as fast as pos- 
sible. It would be interesting to know, 
in this connection, just how those papers 
and people feel who have said what they 
considered very cutting and sarcastic 
things about this gigantic industry in 
the past few months. Especially are the 
West Superior papers commended to 
watch the smoke of the Car works. 

The work of erecting the towers for 
the incline ore railway to the top of the 
stack at the furnace of the Duluth Iron 
«t Steel company began today. With 
fairly favorable weather false-work will 
be done this week. 

Everything is either here or on the way 
from the Iron Bay foundry at Marquette, 
except a part of the machinery in the 
machine shop. Things look very lively 
around the handsome plant on the bay 
shore. 

Messrs. Du Charme & Commo an- 
nounce an opening ball at the Washing- 
ton hotel, Friday evening, Jan. 10. As 
the policemen's ball at the city hall oc- 
curs on the same evening, no one who 
wants to dance need keep his toes still. 
Kev. B. Mitchell of Duluth will lec- 
ture in the Plymouth Congregational 
church next Monday evening. Subject, 
"India, Her Peoples and Religions." 

The revival services Ijeing held in the 
different churches are largely attended 
and productive of much gcxxl. 

O. C. King has on exhibition a fine 
oil painting which he intends to raffle. 

The policemen report a large sale of 
tickets for the ball to be given Friday 
night in the city hall. A good time is 
promised those who attend. 



Notice is hereby given that the part- 
nership heretofore existing between W. 
B. Dixon and E. T. Filley, under the 
firm name of Dixon & Filley, is this day 
dissolved by mutual consent. The busi- 
ness after this date will be carried on by 
W. B. Dixon who will assume all the 
obligations of said firm. 

W. B. Dlxon, 
E. T. Filley. 

January Ist, 1890. 

A big snap in West Duluth. We have 
four lots on First avenue west and Main 
street. Price I3G00; easy terms. 
D. H. Stevenson & Co., 

43 Exchange building. 



Borrow on Short Time. 

We can make you some small loans on 
short time at best rates. 

Jones & Brace. 




R. KROJANKER, 



Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fi 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 



ne 



Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
kinds of furs a specialty, l^* Good workm t ^- 
ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 



WANTED ! 



209 East Superior Street, 



Duluth, Minn. 



Smoke the Endion cigar, the finest in 
the market. W. A. Footk i, Co. 



Messrs. A. Fitger &. Co., the well- 
known brewers, are increasing their 
facilities for storing beer by manufac- 
turing great oaken casks. They are 
made of split staves, three inches thick, 
and so constructed that the joints can 
hardly be discerned. Consequently not 
a drop of the liquor can ooze through 
under any circumstances, as the wood is 
thoroughly soasont d. The binds are of 
hoop iron of unusual strength. Some 
idea of the size of these casks may be 
gained from the fact that they are seven 
feet eight inches in diameter and will 
contain each sixty barrels. They are 
veritable behemoths, and strongly sug- 
gestive of the great tun at Heidelberg. 

The company has just built a fine 
new barn on some newly acquired prop- 
erty. The building is constructed in 
the most durable manner, double- 
papered, and warmer than aaost dwell- 
ing houses. There are twelve stalls for 
the accommodation of the horses of the 
firm, all furnished with every con- 
venience. 

A fine gold medal costing $25 is to be 
given to the most graceful lady skater at 
the West End Parlor skating rink. 
Twenty-first avenue and Superior street, 
next Saturday night. Remember this 
race, as it promises to be very exciting. 
Competent judges will decide the race. 
Everybody come and have a good time. 
Capt. S. G. Johnson, manager; T. M. 
Erickson, proprietor. 



Look at this list 


of barirains. 


80 acres in section 10-50-14. 


IGO " 


ti 


9-50-15. 


160 " 


i( 


4-50-15. 


80 " 


(t 


30-50-14. 


40 " 


t( 


23-50 15. 


40 " 


.i 


21-50-15. 

Harris Bros 



See our 
column. 



list of bargains in another 

Mc'F.VRLANE Jt AUSTIN. 



WEST END. 



TEMPLE OPE«A NOTES. 



Kiralfy's "Antiope" company, which 
is to appear here on the "iOth, is in finan- 
cial trouble at St. Paul. 

Lillian Lewis has much improved as 
an actress since she l«ist appeared in Du- 
luth. Even metropolitan papers give 
her flattering notices. Her support is 
equal to that of any company on the 
road. 

The cast of characters in Stetson's 
"Uncle Toms Cabin" company includes 
a number of lively people, who give an 
unusual spirit to the well-known drama. 
In the scene of Eliza's escape the 
trained bloodhounds assist in lending 
thrilling features. Contrary to the usual 
rule on these occasions the hounds are 
able to walk across the stage without as- 
sistance, and manifest a lively interest in 
their part of the performance. One of 
the most attractive features of the even- 
ing is the music furnished by a male 
quartet. The voices of the members of 
the quartet blend in sweetest harmony 
and they are obliged to respond to re- 
peated recalls. 



OlHcei-A KttMted. 

The annual meeting of stockholders of 
the American Exchange bank was held 
last evening according to announcement. 
The following offices were electetl: H. 
M. Peyton, president; A. M. Macfarlane, 
manager, and James C. Hunter, cashier. 
The following were chosen as directors: 
H. M. Peyton, J. H. Upham, George 
Spencer, M. J. Forbes and A. R. Mac- 
farlane. These are re-elections through- 
out. It is probable the bank will largely 



increase its capital of 8325,00<J this 
It is doing a tremendous business. 



year. 



In order to give everybody a chance to 
participate in the benefits of our great 
holiday reduction sale, I have decided 
to continue it for the balance of this 
month. Don't miss the opportunity to 
get reliable goods at away-down prices. 
Sale closes positively Friday, Jan. 
31. Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 

The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptly. 
A Big .Snap on Bench Street. 

4 lots on the upper side of Bench 
street, two blocks from ihe street cars. 
Lots 50x140 feet; $1700 each, easy terms. 
Only for this week. 

D. H. Stevenson & Co., 

43 Exchange building. 



The Geuera! News of a I>ay in the Second 
Diviition: The Skaters. 

There will be barrel races at both the 
West End rinks this evening. At the 
Parlor the prize is S5. Both promise to 
be exciting and it is a question which 
will attract the larger crowd. 

The attendance at the fifth reception 
of the West End Social club last night 
was excellent, and it was a pleasant 
event. The Ladies Aid society fur- 
nished the supper. 

Last night seemed to be a night fitted 
for sleighing parties, and there was a 
large number of them out in the West 
End. 

Krupp A Rink, the Michigan street 
butchers, have begun making extensive 
improvements in their shop, such as 
lengthening their main building and in- 
creasing the capacity of their ice-house 
and adding new machinery. They will 
have the finest establishment in Duluth 
when it is completed. 

A new clothing store, of which Isaac 
Summerfield is to be the proprietor, 
will open soon at 1825 Superior street 
in the store formerly occupied by B. J. 
Skofstad, the grocer. 

A ladles' skating race for a gold medal 
is announced to take place at the Parlor 
rink on Saturday evening the 18th. The 
contest will be for a 825 gold medal. 
Four ladies are now entered and if any 
more wish to do so they can enter by 
calling on Capt. Johnson at the rink. 

Dr. W. H. Magie was a visitor at the 
Iwin cities yesterday. 

Jos. Jensen is on the sick list this 
week. 

Thomas Craig, Bob Smollet and Wm. 
Butchart formed a party which went out 
to Ely yesterday afternoon. 



Commercial binding and printing re- 
ceives accurate and prompt attention at 
The Herald Job Rooms. 



BROWN 



R 



RESULT OF PLANTING. 



The Whltefiah Plaiite<i in I>a.<t Years Now 
Bi^ Knouuh for Food. 

Fishermen who have been at work 
about Duluth and in the bays fifteen to 
twenty miles below the city this fall and 
winter, report a large catch of whitefish, 
better than for several years, better in 
fact than at any time since the Minne- 
sota state tish commission first began 
planting in the waters along Minnesota 
Point and the north shore, five years ago. 

From two facts the fishermen are cer- 
tain that this increase is but the natural 
result of the beneficent policy of plant- 
ing, which was first sturted, as stated 
above, five years ago. In the first place 
the eggs then planted were not obtained 
from Lake Superior fish, but from white- 
fish diifering slightl> from those found 
here, so slightly, however, that none but 
an expert can see the difference. Then 
these fish are caught in shoals just 
about where the planting was done, 
which is conclusive pi oof that they were 
from there, and they are of about the 
size to indicate a four or five-year 
growth. 

When it is remembered that these 
earlier plantings have been of from 10,- 
000,000 to 15,000,C00 eggs yearly, and that 
they have already begun to make sucii 
a difference in the catch, it can readily 
be seen that when the fish planted by 
the new government hatchery, 100,000,- 
000 or more yearly, are big enou[;h to 
catch, there will be a tremendous in- 
crease in the business. Lake Superior 
can and will become a vat't food reservoir, 
and all at trifiing expense and trouble, and 
the fish industry at Duluth will be in- 
creased manyfold. 



COAL AT SAVANNE. 



to 



A DlBCOTery That 1» Very Important 
I>Dluth and the Northwest. 

Says John Robertson, Canadian cus- 
toms official stationed here: "I was 
pleased to read that editorial in 'The 
Herald last night in reference to the 
difference in the price of fuel between 
here and St. Paul. That this is destined 
to be a great manufacturing point does 
not admit of doubt for a single instant. 
Haven't you heard that a bed of anthra- 
cite coal has been discovered seventy- 
five miles in a northwesterly direction 
from Port Arthur on the Canadian 
Pacific railroads 

"I don't think there is any doubt but 
there is any quantity of coal in that 
vicinity, and if that is the case coal will 
be laid down here as cheap as at Buffalo. 
This will give Duluth an advantage in 
this respect that cannot be overesti- 
mated." 



o 



T 



H 



E 



R 



S 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restauiants, 



—AND- 



TAKE NOTICE! 

We are agents for the celebrated 

Green Point China 



The Best in the World. 



Oet our prices and you will be per- 
fectly satisfied. 



19 West Superior Street. 



FROM DESPAIR TO JOY. 



rhe Painfal Story of 



Ska 



wkmlly 



I<OTel]r Iiadyf 
8e«ar*d Hap- 



nd How- 
pi aau> 

Mr* Morton D. HarUn, redding at No. 6t 
West 25th Street. New York City, haa passed 
through a moat wonderful experience. Mrs. 
Harlan had a happy home 
and through her devotion to 
her home duties over-taxed 
her itrength. She had de- 
prcMed feelings, entire lacl€ 
of energy in life, and finally 
a cough at night and morn* 
ing which grew worse each 
day. Upon looking In the 
laaashesaw dark circlas under her eyes and 




f.',' 



iia<l thnt she wasgrowina- thinner and losing 
ail interest in llf«. This painful state of thinKS 
continued for months until finally she became 
to weak she could not attend to her duties and 
was confined to her bed the greater part of the 
time. One day Mrs. Harlan's very dear friend 
Mrs. Willard called and wa* amazed to see her 
go wan and faded. Two bright hectic spots 
stood upon each chp«k. her lips were blue, 
her face pinched and drawn, and there was a 

f>iteous look In her erf*. Mrs. Willard know 
his meant consumption and her heart was 
touched for her friend. At her earnest rvquMt, 
the use of an English Rem- 
edy lor consumption was 
tried. At the start very 
little effect oould be seen, so 
great an inroad had the dis- 
ease made, but by degrees 
Mrs. Harlan began to regain 
her lost appetite, then her 
Itrength, thea ber hope, 
then her health, and she Is to- 
day in perfect physical con- 
dition, wholly as a resnlt of 
the use of Dr. Acker's Eng- 
Usb Ilemedy lor Consump-j 

Ion. 

The lesson of this simple story should be plain 
U> all. No man or woman can afford to neglect 
those first symptoms of consumption, wiiirh 
•eein so slight liut which becomes so terrible 
unloas taken in time. This Great Remedy has 
laved the livt« of hundreds of well known men 
ind women who were on the verge of the gravs 
'rom consumption but who are well and a»p}fj 

o-duy. It is sold universally. 

For Sale in Duluth by Boyce & Totman 




RUBBER 



Fine Seals. 

Stencils. 

Steel Stamps. 

Badges. 

Checks. 

Fountain Fada 

Band Daters. 



s 

T 
A 



P 
S 



Self Inking. 
Standards 

Gems. 

Midgets. 

Tip-Top. 

Pocket 

Pen and Pencil 



DULUTH RUBBER STAMP WORKS, 
1 3 First Avanus Wast. 



O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Rooms 510, ill and SI?. Dulutli Union National Bank Building. 



Boil i lie Hill 



FOR SALE: 

50-]4--ln Jcreage, - - $2, 

49-15--ln taie, - 1, 

Superior Street - - 1, 
Dock Property, - 



NOTICE. 



The regular annual meeting 
holders of the First National Hank of Tower 
will be held at its offlee in Tower, Minnesota, 
on Tuesday, January 14th, lf<it(t, between the 
hours of 10 o'clock a. m. and 4 o'clock p. m., 
for the election of directors and for such other 
business as may come before the meeting. 
G. W. Hkrtges, 

Tower, Minn., Cashier, 

December 13th, 188». 



HARWOOD'S 

Cit) Transportation Freiglit and Express, 

DRAYS. 



Office, 17 First Avenue Weet. 



Lots for sale as 
as $25 each. 



low 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. 



FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table is supplied, and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



Probate Notice. 



StATB or MiNNBSOTA. f „o 

County of St. Louis. ( ^*' 



Probate Court, Special Term, 

, l>*«i. 



December 



In 

36th, 

In tbo matter of the estate of Charlemagne 
Tower, dec-eased. 

I/Ctters testamentary on the estate of said 
deceased Itelug this day granted unto Charle- 
mHgue Tower, Junior, Richard Henry Lee and 
Jul. us A. Hailey of Philadelphia, In the state 
of Penn.sylvania, 

It is ordered that all claims and demands of 
all jxjrsons ugainst said estate be presented to 
this fiurt for examination and allowance at 
the probate office, in the court house in Du- 
luth, In said county, on Monday, the thirtieth 
div)' of June, Irttu, at tea o'clock a. m. 

It is further ordered that six months from 
the date hert-of Ik? allowed to creditors to pre- 
sent their claims against said estate, at the ei- 
pinition of which time all claims not preeented 
to salil c<iurt, or not proven to its satisfaction, 
shall be forever burred, unless for cause shown 
further time be allowed. 

Ordered further that notice of the time and 
place of the hearing and examination of said 
claims and demands, shall be iriven by pul)- 
lisliing this order on Friday in each week 
lor three successive weeks. In The Duluth 
Evening Herald, a dally newspaper printed 
and published at Duluth in said county. 

Dated at Duluth, the ajth day of December, 
A. D. 1889. 

By the Court, Phincas Ater, 

ISeal.l Judge of Probate. 

Walter Aver, 

Attorney for Exeeutors. 

Dec. 27, Jan. ;}-10. 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY, 



MINNESOTA. 



First class In every way. Newly refitted. 
Finest sample room Id town. Livery In 
connection. WILI lAM GRANT, Prop 

Open November I . 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFiCE 

17 Piret Avenue West. 



FOR SALE 



Forty Acres 



ADJOINING 




L 




-AT A- 



ILCWests 



NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 

Sp.ciflo for Ilyptiiia, Dizzines.a.Fits, Neumlcln, W.al;o 
lutiiess, Ment.il I)<'prt'Ssion. Holtcniiijr of the ilraiii. rt' 
suiting; ilk Inanilyanii leadint; to misery (le<-a\- aii.i 

le ith. Premature OM Age, Uarreiinoss. Los.s oi t'owei 
ineithc" ^e.v, Involuntary I.oa>e!<, anil Spermatorrhoea 

au:'ed bv overexertion of the biiln. self-abu-c o' 
.iver-indnlfrenoe Kach box contain'^ one month's ireai- 
mont St a ho<. or tix for 8.>. cent l>v mail prepail. 
With e.ii-h order fur ^ix ItoirM, will hend pun ha.-4er 
^t!araiiti« to refunci money if the treatment failti to 
>.-are. Ouoxantoes iseueU aailgeatunc soltl only Oy 

Boyce & Totman, Phoenix Drug Store, and 
7 West Superior street, sole agents, Duluth, 
Minn. 



Bargain 



NEW HOTEL. 

THE 

METROPOLITAN, 



St. Paul, Minn., 

Cor. 4tli and Waahlnffton Sta. 

On Cable Car Line. Best Table in the Norui 
west. Hates <3.00 and I'pward.v. 

\V. U. BAfunts. Hauagsr. 



Mortgages Negotiated. 



6 AND 7 HER CENT. 



Lowest 
security, 
quire of 



rates for 
Before 



all sizes and grades 
borrowing elsewhere 



Of 
In- 



N. J. UPHAM, 



Cnder First Nat. Bank. 



NATIONAL BANK BUILDINQ. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



Inquire of 



L.S., 



Postofflce Box A A. 



Purchasers for 



Three Valuable and Nice-Lpg Lots 



L t 

J 1 

] 

I 
— ■ 

■ 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



-:- WILL BE SOLO VER! CBEAP -:- 



-ALSO- 



Three Good Building Lots on Ninth Street, 



Near Third avenue east 



All these are well located and very accessible. 
Good schopis and graded streets close by. 



Apply by letter or in person to 



it 



ED," 



C-i^iSE :E±.':ni:^j^JLJD. 



CAUTION 



W. L. Dougias' name and the price 

are stamped on the tottom of all Shoef 

_ advertised hv hitn before leaving hit 

factory; th s protects the wearers ajjainst high prices and inferior gOOdf- 
If>our dea or does not keep the stvle or kind yv.ii want, or offers you shoes withon 
W. L. Douglas' name and price stamped on them, and says they are just m 
good, do n<it be deceived thereby, but send direct to the Factory for 3'ou can ga 
what you M ant by return mail, postage paid. Dealers make more profit on un- 
known shos that are not warranted by anybody ; therefore do not be induced to 
buy shoes ttiat have no reputation. Buy only those that have W. Li. "Douglaj^ 
name and tSie price stamped on the bottom, and you are sure to get full value for 
yourmone^'. Thousands of dollars are saved annually in this country by the 
wearers of i^ . L. Douglas' Shoes. In ordering by mail state whether you 
want Congress, Button or Lace, London cap toe, plain French toe, or narrow cap 
toe, and be sure to give size and width you wear. I can fit any foot that is not de- 
formed, as ny shoes are made in a great variety of widths, sizes and half sizes. I 
guarantee i ht, prompt delivery and perfect satisfaction or money refunded upon 
return of the shoes in good condition. 



W. l>. UOITGL^^S, Brockton, 

W. L. DOUGLAS 

S3 S H O E cen't^Smm. 

Is a fiiio seamless ealf shae, with DongolA 
tops and Oak Leather bottom*. They are 
made ia CotiKn^ss, Button and Lape on L>on- 
don Cap Toe, Narrow Cap Toe, and Plain 
French To<- Lasts, in sizes from 5 to II, in- 
cluding h:ilf'i«ize8 nnd in all width*. Ifyoa 
have been pa>inK from S5 to 06 for Bhoea 
of tills quality du nut do ao Ioniser. One pair 
w^ill wear as IfinK as two pairs of common 
ahoeH fold liy de»Iert> tbat are not ^rarranted 
by the iiianufaoturer. 

Our <-lainiK for this aboe over *U other S3 
shoes advertised, are : 

1st. It eoiitaiii8 better material. 

2d. It U more stylish, better Attlng mod 

diiraliie. 
Sd . It Ki ves better general satisfaction. 
4th. It ex>Kl 8 mure money to make, 
fith. 1 1 saveti mure money for the consnmer. 
6th. It i« Kold by more dealer* throoshoat 

thi> V. S. 
7th. It's Kreat success in dne to merit. 
8th. It cannot be duplicated by any other 

luiin iifacturer. 
9th. It Ih thobcMt in the world, and has a 
Inrgir dfiiiund titan any other SS 
bhf>e advertised. 

SB|000 wi: I be paid to any pt^rwon who will prove the above statomenta to he tmtme. 
The Follnwing l,ine8 will l>e found to be of the .Same Quality of £xoeUenee. 

CKNUINB HAXD-SEW KD, which takes the place of ens- 

toni-ma.ie shoes tiiat cott from $7 to $9. 

THE ORIGIVAL AX» ONLY HAXD-SEWED tVEtX 

l$l KHOK. Equals custum-niade shoes costing iruiu f6 to ^ 

FOltrOLICKMEN. Railroad Men and Letter Carriers all 

wear tl;ei:i. Smooth inside as a Hand-Sewed Shoe. NoTackS 

or Wa-^c Tiircad to hurt the ieet. 

IS IT^KXCELLED FOR HEAVT WEAR. Beat Calf ShM 

for the price . 

AVORKIN'OMAN'-S. Is the best in the world for ton«^ wear t 

<)>ie pair outjlit to wear a man a year. 

IS EQUAL TO SHOES THAT COST FROM S3 TO 9SMK 

Une pair will wear lunger than any shoe ever sold at the prica. 

FOR liOTS is thf> best School Shoe In the world. 




S5.0(> SHOE 
$4.00 SHOE 
$3.50 SHOE 

S2.5(> SHOE 
$2.25 SHOE 
$2.0(» SHOE 
$2.0(l SHOE 

^f "V fS O U ^% C YOUTH'S SCHOOL, gnves the small Boys a chance to 

^9 1 ■ # ^9 ^9 ■■ ^J Km the best shoes in the world. 
PH made i 1 Congress, Button and Lace. 

W. L. DOUGLAS $3 AND $2 SHOES JSr«. 

Both Ladies' .Siiocs arc made insi/^sfr.jin i tor, in?luiling h.iU sizes, and B, C, D, E and EE widths. 

STYLES OF LAOIES' SHOES. 

"The FniMch Opera," "The Spanish Arch Opera," "The American Common- 
Sense," "T le Medium Common-$>ense." All made in Button In the Latest Styles. 
Also, Frencli Opera in Front Lace, on S3 Shoe only. 

Consumer ; should remember that W. L. DOUGLAS is the largest and only Shoe Manufacturer 
io the world, supplying shoes direct from factory, tbiUKivinj' all the middle-men's profits to tha 
weaier. W. J^DOViXLAa, Brockton, Waas. 

FOR SALE BY SUFFEL&CO. 



I 

r 

■ 
V 

' »■■ 

I 

I 

■ 

■ 

.L 

» 

I 
j 

I 

I 

■ 

■ 

• ■ 
' ' ■ ' - ■ r- 

• i 

i 

1 



MEMBERS OF THE 



f 



DDLUTH CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION. 



American Exchange Bank 
Bell &. Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Security EJank of Duluth 
State Bank of Duluth 
National Bank of Connmerce 
Marine Bank 



CAPITAL. 

$300,000 
100,000 

1,000,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
260.000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

10,000 

100,000 

26,000 







— "s. 



t 




\ 

I 







DXJLUTH liVElOKQ HEBATJ>; JANTTABY 9, 1890. 



WORLD OF COllEeCE, 



The Markets Are All Dull 
Grain and Stocks 
Today. 



for 



Gossip of the Boards; Daily 

Movement; Prices on 

Stock. 



There was a verj' dull market today, 
but prices were firm at a small advance 
over last night. Cables were quiet and 
steady, all American markets very firm, 
seaboard clearances fair, amounting to 
TS.CW busof wheat and 6000 bbls and 
5800 sacks of ilour. 

The receipts in the Northwest were 
about the same as yesterday, but Du- 
luth had a good increase. This was 
chiefly on ai-count of the unloading of 
cars accumulated on track. Cash prices 
txlay were }a to -'4 aix)ve yesterday's. 
No. i hard sold at T'J, No. 1 northern at 
7l"> and No. 2 northern at 72 and at the 
close sellers were asking these prices, 
but no one wanted the wheat at such 
figures. January closed at 79 sellers. 
Way opened at 84 bid, >8 above last 
night, ruled steady all day and closed ai 
84 bid. May No. 1 DortMern closed at 81 
nominal. 

The Daily Movement. 

Cars on track: Wheat, 15, corn 10, 
oats 4.,* Receipts: Wheat 40,533 bu., 
corn 1(5.781 bu Shipments: Wheat 
286'2 bu., corn '20,745 bu. Inspection: 
Wheat '2 cars No. 1 hard, 2 cars No. 
1 northern; corn 9, oats 13. Minneapolis 
reported 215 cars on track. Receipts 



there 

47.125 

flour. 



were 127,i)25 bu. 
bu. wheat and 



and shipments 
24,105 bbls. of 



Chlraeu Gossip. 

The following dispatches are over the 

?rivate wires of W. W. Bill, successor to 
ressy, Wheeler A Lewis: 

Chii-ago, Jan. 9.— Wheat, active and 
firm, the buyers today being the shorts 
who sold yesterday on the break, and 
one or two prominent houses who have 
been short sellers for a month past. In 
brief, the advance seems to he a bear's 
bulge. Cables were firm, and noted an 
advance of half-penny, but beyond that 
there was no bull news and but little of 
interest to either side. The sma'l ad- 
vance seems to bring in but little good 
buying and we do not believe it will be 
maintained. 

Corn, market dull and featureless. 

Provisions have been tirm through- 
out the day. Near the close the market 
was very activ*^ and higner, the pur- 
chasers being commission houses havini; 
a country trade which is supposed to be 
short. Within the past week there have 
been some large purchases of Mny pork 
said to be for New York, which does not 
cone on the market again. Close, strong 
with rather an e.tcited feeling. 

Xewr York Stocks. 

The following are closing prices on the 
New York stixk exchange as reported by 
W. W. Bill Jt Co.: 



ON BASEB ALL. 

Tlie Wanl Kestr-.iininij suit Today ; Scraps 
of Vnried iiports. 

New York, Jan. 9. — There was a big 
crowd of baseball enthusiasts in the su 
preme court chambers this morning, 
owing to the fact that the suit in which 
John B. Day of the Metropolitan Exhi- 
bition company, is seeking to restraia 
John M. Ward from playing with the 
League until after the last day of Octo- 
ber next, was set for peremptory hear- 
ing. 

The question upon which Judge 
O'Brien is called to render a decision is 
whether the "reserve clause" of the 
IPlayers' agreement is valid and of full 
legal effect. Both 8idi?8 were represented 
by an eminent array of council. 

Nf.w York, Jan. 9.— Judge Morgan J. 
O'Brien sitting in supreme court cham- 
bers, heard the arguments of eminent 
counsel today on the motion of the 
National League of Baseball Players 
clubs, through the Metropolitan Exhi- 
bition company, for an injunction to 
restrain John M. Ward from playing 
with any other than the New York base- 
ball club. For the purposes of the suit 
John B. Day, president of the New York 
club, was made plaintiff in the case. 

The motion was in reality only the 
preliminary step to a test case to decide 
whether the word "reserve" stipulates 
that a man shall be subject to the call 
of the league for more than one year. 
Messrs. Evarte, Choate and Beaman ap- 
peared for the plaintiff, and Messrs. 
.Anderson and Howland for the defend- 
ant. There were a number of prominent 
baseball men present. 

Muldoon Win .Appear. 

New Yokk, Jan. 9. — William Muldoon, 
Sullivan's trainer, who was arrested yes- 
terday and paroled, gave §500 bonds to- 
day in police court to appear for exam- 
ination on Governor Lowry's requisition. 



For C'liesK Men. 

Havan.4, Jan. 9.— The fifth game of the 
chess match between Messrs. Tschorigin 
and Ciunsberg was begun last night, but 
at midnight, after fifty -eight moves, was 
suspended to be resumed totlay. The 
opening move was an evans gambit. 



Sporting: Notes 
the ex-champion 



oarsman, is 



Today. 

Cbicatro, Burl!nirton Ac Quincy. 107 

Amuriciin <'oUoa Oil 31 

Ml-(^>uri Paiitli- 73?» 

Ni)rtlu>rD P:ic-iHc preferred "iVi 

CbicuKO. Milwaukee Jc :$i. Paul.. «i>h 

Sutrur Trust 61H 

Gas Trust 44 'i 

Louisville^ Nashville ^«i?i 

Ctaic-atro & Xorlbwe«tem lliHK 

Rock Islaud 974 

Lake Shore 1115 

BeadiDg 37*% 

Kichmond Terminal 214 

Atohiaxjn 32^ 

I>eiaware Jc Lacicawanaa ISTfx 

Leadi'rust 201% 

Westeru • nion 844 

Tnion Patinc 67 

OU HB=!i 



Yester- 
day 
107', 
3P3 
734 
74', 

e»^ 
54 Vi 

44'. 

Si\ 
110', 

S^^4 
ltH'« 
SB's 
3U, 

137^8 

a>', 

84S 

6t>'s 

103', 



Minneapolia Close. 

MlsvEAjPous. Jun y— <:i alnjr quotations: 
No. 1 hard, Jauuaiy, 7»*'i: May, J-y^; on 
track. fO-iii^-I-j. No. I north<Tn, laauury, 
77; May, ol jV-*: on irack. 7y',';fr«0. No. :: 
northern, January. 7.5; May. »<j; on tiack. 
7ti<(i7s. 



Chieaifo Close. 

Chicaoo. Jan. 9. 1:15 p. m. close.— Wheat 
lower. January. '6\; February 777i; May. 
hl'iask-d. Curn hi^rher; January, 'Ji>it hid: 
FeDruary, ai'.fii^*: Ma>,:» asked. 



THE DISTRICT COURT. 



€«•« 67 



Readies the Jury; Both Jiidi;es 
Bu^y; .Uore Indictiiieots. 

Judge Ensign rushed his set of cases 
through rapidly with one exception this 
morning, the following disposition of the 
call being made: 

No i;£J— Wells-Stone Mercantile 'X)mt>any vs. 
Hoilaud Jc Thoii'psou et a ., set tor Jan. 21. Nc. 
13ii-Wiiuelin ttteiiiK vs. Asa Daii;. blrieken off 
calendar on umtioD or plaintiff. No. la— 
Same. No. 1J7— P V. l/wyer is. A. C. Monroe 
et tti,. set tor Jan. 1.5. No, i:jtJ— lidith E. Muu- 
Son vs. Lewis ti. UuKhes, jud(fiueut ordered 
for plaiuiltl. 

The set of cases until Tuesday before 
Judge Ensign is as follows: 

Jau. lij— Xos. IBl, IK.', lOtt. 173. 174. 
Jan. U-Nos. 17«. 1.9, 150. Icii. lisit. 
Jan 13-Nos. I'M, li*4, 1«q, IMb. Iii7, 199. 

Case 131 was temporarily paseed owinjf to the 
illness of oue ol ilie ailorm-ys. 

iieti>re J ud(te btearus, caite 67 reached the 
jurj after dinner. 

In case :Aj1, u. L. .Vnne vs. G. P. Larson et 
al.. au order was entered that the au jw>-r of 
the inlerveuor be btiickeu out and ;hat judjf- 
meut t>e entered for the plaintiff. Case I'f.t 
continued, in cases Nos. 113, ll.j, 122, 123. 124, 
126 and 12o. jury w^i... waived and were placed 
on the list to be tr^ed. 

The grand jury came in at noon with 
the following indictments: John Court- 
D®yi grand larceny, first degree; Theo- 
dore R. Robinson, grand larceny, first 
degree; W. J. McCrary, forgery, second 
degree; Will Harrington, grand larceny, 
second degree; Charles Crump, (colored; 
assault, sec-ond degree; Antony Gisch, 
grand larceny, second degree. 

The following is the set of cases for 
trial before Judge Stearns up to and in- 
cluding Monday: 

January li>— Nos. 113. 114. IL), 116, 119. 
January 11-Xos. 121. 122. lia. 1;'4. 126 
January 13— Nos. 12B. i27, 12-. i:m LB. 

In the afternoon seeaioQ before Judge 
Stearns, the indicted prisoners were ar- 
raigned and pleaded as follows: Wil- 
liam Harrington, ♦{uilty of petty lar- 
ceny; William J. McCorary, guilty; J. B. 
Vallaincourt, not guilty; John Courtney, 
guilty; Joseph Kra use, guilty; Anthony 
Gisch, no answer and a bench warrant 
was placed in the hands of an officer. 
Charles Crump was allowed one day to 
plead. I. E. West was appointed by the 
court as counsel to defend him. 



Sadler, 
dead. 

Pitcher Doran of the New Haven club 
is signed by the Pittsburg Players club. 

The Cleveland League club has signed 
Ezra P. Lincoln, a left-handed pitcher, 
who played last season with the Brock- 
ton. Mass., team. 

Herr Pander, a Dutchman, won the 
international skating match at .\m6ter- 
dam yesterday. He covered the distance 
in Im. '24. '2 os. 

Fred Pfeffer announces that the 
Players league will resort to the courts 
in the case of every man who has broken 
contracts with it. 

The date for the 14-inch balk-line 
billiard match at Chicago for the Schae- 
fer emblem, between Maggioli and Hat- 
ley, has been finally set for Jan. '23. 

Richard J. Jordan has challenged 
George R. Howard to run in Cincinnati 
for the 220-yar4s championship of Ohio. 

Many excellent judges of billiards 
declare that Maurice Daly will be the 
champion in the coming tournaments. 

The Des Moines club has signed Daniel 
Clare, Pet» Summers, M. .\. Brirablecom, 
Ed L. Fusselback, W. T. Traffley, John 
A. Walsh, John F. Roach. 

The boxing, wrestling and fencing 
committee of the Amateur Athletic 
union has decided to try Pat Cahill, the 
ex-champion middle-weight boxer of the 
Scottish-.\merican .\thletic club, on a 
charge of professionalism at the Astor 
house, Feb. 6. Cahill's club asked for 
the trial. 

Manager Buckenberger of the Colum- 
bus team has received the signatures to 
contracts of the following reserved men 
of last vear's team: Charles Crooks, 
.John J. Doyle, Ed Bligh, John B. Mun- 
yan, Charles T. Riley, Harry Esterday, 
William W. Widiltr. This makes a total 
of ten men so far signed. 

President Speas has received Conway's 
contract. The Kansas City magnate 
says the National league had to pay 
more than §10,(XX) for Stearns, Long and 
Hamilton. The triumvirs are negotiat- 
ing with Stearns by wire, and Mr. Speas 
thinks they will have no trouble in 
signing him as well as Long, and also 
that Ilamilton will sign with the Phila- 
delphia National League club. 

The Pittsburg Players club will be 
strengthened by the addition of Gum- 
liert and Quinn, the latter being the 
Baltimore catcher, who signed a con- 
tract yesterday. Manager Hanlon also 
had a talk with Gumbert, and the latter 
will also sign shortly. 

ARE FROZEN OUT. 

The City Mall a (enter of Disturbance. 
Reason "Kconomy." 

The officials and employes of the city 
hall this forencx)n were in a bad way. 
For some reason the steam failed to cir- 
culate, and as a result the rooms were 
very cold, too chilly, in fact, to allow any 
work to be done. The principal suffer- 
ing was in the city engineer's office. The 
reason given for this state of affairs is 
that a new supply of coal screenings 
has been laid in, but being so very fine 
it does not contain sufficient combu.stible 
power to create the necessary steam with 
the draft in the furnaces. 

Alderman Thomas is blamed for this 
state of affairs. It is said that he has 
been endeavoring to economize on the 
coal bill, which accounts for the pur- 
chase of the worthless rubbish to be 
used as a substitute for coal. It is 
understood that an indignation com- 
mittee will wait upon the alderman and 
demand that this state of affairs be recti- 
fied. 



CIIMP TW[NT! APPLI[S. 



The 



Notorious Clan 
Camp Wants 
Books Back 



na 
Its 



Gael 



To 



Reorganize the Organiz- 
ation; New Trial 
Next Week. 



Chicago, Jan. 9 — [Special]. — Judge 
McConnell, who has been recuperating 
at Pass Christian, Miss., since the ver- 
dict was rendered in the Cronin case, is 
expected to return tomorrow. In that 
event he will take his seat on the bench 
on Friday. The first question which he 
will be called upon to decide is the appli- 
cation of the now notorious Camp 20 for 
th« return of the book containing the 
list of members, and which was offered 

in evidence during the trial and sub- 
sequently impounded. 

The application has been made with a 
view of reorganizing the Camp, with 
John F. Beggs as president, but it will 
be stoutly resisted by States .\ttorney 
Longenecker, who takes the grouud that 
having been placed in evidence, the 
record cannot be surrendered until all 
the proceedings in this celebrated case 
have been concluded. 

The motion for a new trial is on the 
docket for Monday next, and, as the 
record for the defense is nearly com- 
pleted. It is probable that no delay will 
be sought. 

Construction Company Officers. 

Red Winc, Jan. 9.— The Red Wing, 
Duluth & Sioux City Construction com- 
pany has elected officers as follows: 
Directors, L. F. Hubbard, S. B. Foot, F. 
W. Hoyt, G. H. Crary, T. B. Sheldon, W. 
C. Williston, H. E. Perkins. Red Wing; 
W. C. Rice, Minneapolis; R. S. Munger, 
Duluth; H. W. Holly, Winnebago City; 
W. A. Morin, Albert Lea; M. J. Toher, 
C. E. Sheldon. Owatona; presitlent, L. 

F. Hubbard; vice-president, T. B. Shel- 
don: secretary, F. W. Hoyt; treasurer, 

G. H. Crarv. 



THE LAKE CARRIERS. 

They Elect Managers for 18U0; Other 
Marine News. 

Fully 50 per cent of the tonnage in 
the membership of the Lake Carriers 
association was represented at the an- 
nual meeting held in Buffalo. The fol- 
lowing shows the new board of mana- 
gers: President, S. D. Caldwell, Buffalo; 
vice-presidents, Frank J. Firth, Erie; 
Thomas Wilson, Cleveland; P. P. Miller, 
Buffalo; Ira H. Owen, Chicago; Secre- 
tary, Frederick Almy, Buffalo; treasurer, 
James C Evans, Chicago; Iward of man- 
agers, James Ash; W. Bullard, Union 
Steamboi ^ company; S. D. Caldwell, 
Western T ansit; E. T. Evms, Lake Su 
perior 'transit; W. P. Hecry, Lehigh 
Valley; P. P. Miller of Buffalo; Frank J. 
Firth, Anchor line, Erie; M. A. Bradley, 
H. M. Hanna, Thomas Wilson, Wilsons 
line of Cleveland; A. W. CoUom, Toledo; 
W. Livingstone, Jr., Michigan Naviga- 
tion; Eber Ward, Wards Detroit Jc Lake 
Superior line of Detroit; James David- 
son, Bay City; Joseph Austrian, Lake 
Michigan and Lake Superior conpany; 
W. M. Egan; Ira Owen, Escanaba and 
Lake Michigan company of Chicago; R. 
P. Fitzgerald, David Vance of Milwau- 
kee; Alex McDougall, John Gordon of 
Duluth. 

The Wisconsin: The new steamer on 
the stocks at the Milwaukee company's 
shipyard will be ready for launching in 
about one month. The engine has ar- 
rived, and the bed plate is already in 
place. It is proposed to have the ma- 
chinery set up and the boiler in position 
before she is floated. 

The Cleveland Vessel-Owners associa- 
tion recommends the following for the 
Sault river: Tripod at Sweet Island; 
tripod at lower end of Mud lake; tripod 
at head of Mud lake; removal of dan- 
gerous obstructions at Sailors Encamp- 
ment; channel widened at Black Hole; 
tw-o tripods at St. Josephs Island; two 
tripods at foot of Sugar Island; perma- 
nent tripods at each end of "Nebish;" 
two tripods at lower end of Lake 
George; four trifKxis at upper end of 
Lake George; tripod at Churches, 
trif)ods below Cunningham; two tripods 
at Little Lake George, two tripods on 
main shore; tripods at upper end Little 
Lake George; tripods on main shore at 
P^'armer's Ridges; tripod on Topsail 
Island; range lights at Point au Pins; 
range lights on west side of Round 
Island; such an appropriation for the 
Sault lock and the completion of the 
Hay Lake canal will as insure the work 
being done in two years; the new Hay 
Lake canal to be thorougly lighted, so 
that it can be navigated in the night as 
well as in the day time. 

May Result Well. 

Since the passage of a prohibition law 
in North Dakota the owners of the Fargo 
brewery, the largest in that state, have 
been looking about for a place to move 
to. They have considered Duluth and 
may quite possibly decide to come here, 
though as yet no decision has been made. 
The brewery is one of the largest in the 
Northwest outside of Duluth and the 
Twin cities. 



Death from the Orip. 

Anton Sevf rson, a laborer living at 
2410 West First street, died yesterday of 
pneumonia, c-omplicating influenza. 
This IS the second death from this cause 
and bears out the assertion of the physi- 
cians that it IS fatal in cases where the 
patient's system is debilitated with some 
other disease, as was the case in this 
instance. 



A Most Sad Death. 

The unexpected death of Mrs. Maria 
W. Joerns, which was noted in last 
night's Herald, is extremely sad. There 
are four little children, the youngest but 
two months old, thus suddenly deprived 
of a mother who was tenderly devoted to 
them. Much sympathy is expressed for 
the afflicted husband and motherless 
cnildren. The deceased was aged 31 
years, 2 months and 10 days. The cause 
of her death was typhoid-pneumonia. A 
public funeral will take place Friday 
morning at 10:30 at the residence, 712 
East Fourth street. The interment will 
occur in the afternoon. 



In order to give everybody a chance 
to participate in the benefits of our 
great holiday reduction sale, I have 
decided to continue it for the balance of 
this month. Don't miss the opportunity 
to get reliable gcods at away-down 

Srioes. Sale closes positively Friday, 
an. 31. Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 



We SliouUl UaTe the Best. 

Minneapolis Journal: Duluth is con- 
templating a change in the tractive 
power of her street car system and she is 
in the fortunate position of one who can 
greatly profit by the experience of others, 
obtained at cost. Duluth has her choice 
of electricity or the cable, but she is 
wisely locjking into the merits of the 
compressed air system, which has been 
decidedly successful in Europe, and not- 
ably in I-'rance. In Paris, compressed 
air is not only used to deliver messages 
and packages over the city, but has 
been introduced successsuUy in a line of 
street railway. The street car lines of 
Austria-Hungary are U) use this motive 
power, and its safety to the public, the 
speed attained (from eight to fifteen 
miles an hour) and the ease 
with whch the cars are 

stopped, make the system wor- 
thy of attention in all cities. Mr. 
L<jwry might spend a quiet hour or two 
in the examination of the virtues and 
advantages of compressed air for his 
Minneapolis street railway system. 



Register Resume. 
.\t The Spalding: Charles Frisbee, 
New York; M. B. Roberts, W. E. Steele, 
Minneapolis; .\. W. Maltby, George P. 
CJilman, Chicago; J. W. Coria, Ashland; 
A. E. Clark. John C. Hill, J. H. Ham- 
mond, St. Paul; R S. Tyler, Fargo; J. P. 
Dorsey, J. S. Billings, T. W. Pinkham 
VV. H. Denny, Brainerd; M. F. W^illiams, 
Grand Forks; James D. Bell, Wahpeton. 
At the St. Louis: J. M. Paine, Min- 
neapolis; J. H. A. Lacher, Milwaukee; A. 
T. Dulmagy, Winnipeg; W. M. Kiukaid; 
St Paul; G. M. Peck, Tacoma; H. A. 
Holmes, Casselton; W. G. Kudd, Chi- 
cago. 

At the Merchants: J. P. Engels, New 
York; George C. Messier, Jerry Holland, 
Brainerd; John Ressler, Matt Smith, 
Tower; E. H. Bailey, T. B, Rjke, St. 
Paul. 

For Knticinjr .Minors. 

A case of some importance was tried 
at the municipal court this afternoon, 
being that of the city against Cathro & 
Summers for running a billiard table 
without license. A few days ago these 
defendants were fined about $40 for 
allowing minors to play and the prob- 
abilities are that they will get a stiff 
dose this time. The case was not con- 
cluded when The Herald went to press. 




Absolutely Pure. 



This powder never vanes A marvel of pur- 
ity, strength and wholesiimeness. More eeo- 
nonilcal than the ordinary kinds, and 
cannot be sold in competition with the multi- 
tude of low test, short weljfht. alum or pho6- 



ahate 



powd'^rs. Sold only 
lAKiNQ PoWDKK Co.. 106 Wl 



In eans. Royai 
all street. N. Y. 



PIOIER FOEL CO., 



WKATHER FORECAST. 

Jan. y. —Forecast for Duluth and 
rici7iity for 24 hours comniencinq 10 a.m. 
today: Snow; slightly warmer. 

Observer, Signal Office. 




CROSS CREEK UHIGH, 

FR[[ BUAmilG, 

imiHIiAClIE I BIIUMINOUS, 



Dry Maple. 

Hard .Mixed, 

Slabrt. 

Kdg^in^s. 




CONNELLSVILU 
Anil GAS HOUSE 



Wm PBOMPTLK D[LI»[B[D 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



OtQce: Hotel St. Louis, 326 W. Superior St. 



YARD: 

Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Garfield Avenue 
Rices Point. 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 

— .\M>— 

INSURANCE. 



Rooms 1 , 2. 



DULUTH, 



Exchange BIdg. 

MINN. 



CHICHCSTER'S ENGLISH 



PENNYROYAL PILLS 




RtD CROSS DIAMOND BRAND 

Nafc ici'1 alwft^t rHiAMf. Ladle*, 
a-«k Druftfist for IHavtond Brand, in 
vred, mrt^IIir boxi-a, w'sImI viih blu« 
' ■ibh.m. Take no other. All pllli 
in paatcbt^r-! jkum, pink wrmpperg, are 
^daaseroan countet^eit^ Sen>l 4«. 
(«tanu-i) f<r [-ariicuisra, tesumODlali 
''Keller Tor I.adlea,'* in Utter, bj 
■latl. A'ljm- /'itper. 
CkUhMler t hcK'l (o^ 



and 



DAVID M. FORD, 

Houghton, L. S., Mich. 



DE.iLEK IN 



Lake SupenoE Gold, Iron and Copper stocks 

Michigan Qold Company's Stock a Specialty. 

"The richest mines in the world." 

COKRK.SPONDK>CE SOLICITED. 



Mortgage Sale. 



Default having been made in the payment 
of I he sum of three hundiod and sixty 60-lUO 
dollars. (1360 50-lOU) principal and interest which 
is r-laioieil to he due at the dale of this notice 
uf)on a certain inortg-ajfe duly executed and 
d« liven d by Frank I>oyle, a bachelor.toJam » 
B. Howard and .\lexaiiiier H. Davis, bearing 
date the tenth day of November. A. D. 1H^^ 
and duly rccordeil in tlie ollioe of the rea-ister 
of deeds in anil for the county of Saint Louis 
and state of Minnesota, on the 12ih day of 
November A. D. W^f, at 9 o'clock a.m.'. in 
b<x>k '"M" of mortgages, on page 302; and no 
action or {proceeding a' law or otherwi-e hav- 
ing l>een iii$titule<l to recover the debt se- 
cured by said mortgH^e. or any part thereof: 

Now, therefore, notice is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale contained in said 
ni'irtgage, and pursuant to the statute in such 
c:u*e made and provide<l. the said mortgage 
will he toreclosed. and the premises described 
in and covered by said mortgage, viz: Ixjts 
numboroil hIx (til. seven (T) and eight (Ki and 
tlie northeast (juarter (ne^ii of the southeast 
quar'er (se"*; of section numbered twenty-two 
i2Jj, all in township No sixty-one (HI) north of 
range No. twelve (12) west of the fourth (4th) 
principal meridian, in St. Louis county, and 
state of .Minnesota, with the hert'dltainentsand 
appurtenances will be sold at public auction, 
to the highest bidder for cash, to pay said debt 
and interest, and the taxes (If any ion said prem- 
ises, "nd twenty-tlve dollars, attorney's fees, 
as [Stipulated In and l)y said mortgxge in case 
of foreclosure, and the disbursements allowed 
by law; which sale will be made by the sheriff 
of sad St. Louis county, at the tnmt door of 
the court house, in the city of Duluth, in said 
county and state, on the 2«th day 
of .laiiuary. A. D. 1890, at 10:30 o'clock a m. on 
that day, subject to redemption at any time 
within one year from the day of sale, as pro- 
vided by law. 
Dated DecemtHsr I3th. A. D. 1888. 

James B. Howard, 
and 

Ai^EX.'iNDER H. Davis, 
R. N. Makhle, Mortgagees. 

Attorney. 
Dec. 14-21-28. Jan. 4-11-18-26. 





FREE. 



FREE. 



FREE. 



I 00 Suits Underwear were given away Free to the first I 00 people 
in our store Monday arter our doors opened. We offer all our Under- 
wear at cost to close it out. 



-:- TUESDAY -:- 

I 00 Caps were given away, and all our Caps are to be sold at first 
cost. Sealskin, Otter, Persian Lamb and Plush. All must go regard- 
less of cost. 

-:- W E D N E Sl) A Y -:- 

We gave away FREE I 00 pairs Mittens to the first I 00 people in 
our store and all our Gloves and Mittens will be sold at 10 per cent 
below actual cost. 

OUR GREAT SACRIFICE SALE 

Will continue fifteen days— until stock is reduced. Cost or worth cuts no figure. WE MUST 
REDUCE, even at a great loss. Our low prices have caused us to nneet with unqualified suc- 
cess in this, THE GREATEST SALE OF OUR BUSINESS EXISTENCE. Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock; besides, you would not stop to read them, but we will 
quote a few to give you an idea: 

$7.49 Buys an Elegant Fur-Trimmed Overcoat Worth at Least $ I 5. 
$9.47 Buys an Otter Fur-Trimmed Overcoat Worth at Least $18. 

The same reductions on all our overcoats, Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 
Furnishing Goods. No reserve. We must reduce our stock at least $35,000 (Thirty-five 
Thousand Dollars). Mild weather leaves us overstocked and compels us to take the loss. 
Call and see our prices. 







THE mi EMRN CLO 




M. S. BURROWS & CO 





THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON. Proprietor. 



Strictly First-Class in all tppointments. 



DULUTH. 



MINN. 



A. FITGER & GO'S 



Lake Snperior Brewery 



la the larfrest in the State it Mic neeota ou aide 
of the Twii CItlei. 



Mortgage Sale. 



SEE THAT YOUR TICKETS 



-TO- 



Fargo, Grand Forks, Fergus Falls, Helena 

Butte, Portland, Tacoma. Seattle, 

Victoria, San Francisco, 



AIID ALL POimS III HE NORIiWESI 

VIA THE 

Northern Pacific 




T G. 




The Herald bindery has the beet 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



ai, 



GROUND FLOOR 

327 West Superior street. 



SUPERIOR - LIST. 

Northeast quarter of blocli 6, East Twenty- 
third street. ' 
Lots 23 and 24, block 8, Merriam Park. 
341 West Sixth street. 
I BO and 3 I O West Ninth street. 
638 and 640 West Eighth street. 



The above for sale on 
one-half cash payments. 



one-third to 



No other litie in the Pacific Northwest 
is equipped with. 

COLONIST SLEEPERS 

It is the only rail line to Spokane Falls, 
Tacoma and Seattle. 



For full iDfurmatlOD, rates, etc. 
uddreRB 



call OD or 



J. C. ROBINSON, 



Ticket Agent Union Depot, N. 
W. KOEHNQW. 
Pass. Agent, Duluth, Minn. 



P. R. R. 



WHEREAS, DEFAULT HAS BEEN MADE 
In the cmiditloas of a certain mortgagt;, 
executed and delivered by Mary Sherwin and 

Elijah O. Sberwiu, her husband. inortgaKOrs, 
toAlonzoJ. Whiteman, inurtgag-ce. dated tbe 
eleventh day of October A. D.. 1887. 
and duly recorded in the office of 
tlic rcKister ot deeds of the county of 
Saint Ix)ul8 aud stuto of Minnesota 
on the twenty-ei(flitl» day of November A. D., 
lf<87. at nine o'chxjk a. m.. In book 23 of 
mortguges, on page 13. such default consist- 
ing of the non-payment of the principal and 
interest inonoys secured by said mortgage, on 
which said incrtgagc there is claimed to be duo 
at the date of this notice the amount of 
flvo thousand six hundred and thiity-flve and 
5.'>-IO0 (l5,ti;J5.o6) dollars, principal and Interest, 
and no action or proceeding has t>e<;n insti- 
tuted at law or In equity to recover the debt 
secured by said morCgage, or any part thereof; 
and 

Whereas, said mortgage was duly 
assigned by tiie said Alon/o J Whiteman, 
mortgagee, to Augusta I>cttau, by assignment 
dated the second day of November A. D., 1887, 
and recorded in the office of the register of 
deeds of the county of St. Louis in the stat^ of 
Minnesota, on llietwentj -eighth day of Novem- 
ber A. D.. 1887. at 9 o'clock a. m., in book P of 
mortgages, on page 377. 

Now. notice Is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale contained in said 
mortgage, and of the statute In such 
c.-'o ma<ie and provided, said mortgage 
will 1k3 foreclosed by sale of tlie mortg ged 
premises then^in described, at public auction, 
at the front dot)r of the court house, in the city 
of Duluth, in the county of St. lx)uls and state 
of Minnesota, ou Monday the twenty-seventh 
day of January A. D., 180(i, at ten o'clock in 
the forenoon, to satisfy the amount 
which shall then be due on said mortgage, with 
the interest thereon, and costs and expenses 
of sale, aud seventy-flve dollars attorney's 
fees, as stipulated In said mortgage in case of 
foreclosure. 

The premises described In said morgage, and 
BO to Ih; sold, are the lots, pieces or parcels of 
land, situate In the county of St. Louis and 
state of Mlniieiiota. and known and described 
as follows, to-wlt: 

Lots number thlrttien (13) and fourteen (14) In 
block number nine (»), PortlantI division of Du- 
luth, according tti the recorded plat thereof on 
file In the office of the register of deeds in and 
for the county of St . Louis. 

Dated December 3ni, 18 !». 

AuonsTA LETT.\n, 
Assignee of Alonzo J. Whiteman, 
Mortgagee. 
Waltbr Ayekb, 
Attorney of Augusta Lettau, 
Afsigneo. 

Deo. 12, 19, 26, Jan. 2, 9, 16, 23 



WHITE BEAVER'S 

@GH@A]V] 

HEALS DISEASED LUNGS. DRUGGISTS SELL IT 

T. H. SPEMCE, LA CROSSE, WIS. 



For Sale 



FORT! ACRES 



-IN THE- 



UNICiN DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



Northern Pisciflc Short l.lne. 



DULITTH TO SUPERIOR. 



"ALWAYS ON TIME." 



EAST END 



AT A 



Bargain. 



Except Sunday. . 
Except Su nday . . , 
Except Su nday. . , 

Daily 

Daily 

ExeeptSuaday... 

Daily 

Daily 

Dally 

Dally 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 

Dally 

Daily , 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 



Leave 
Duluth 



6 30 am 

7 36 am 

8 65 am 
10 00 am 
1135 am 

110 pm 
21&pm 
3 2opm 

3 30 pm 

4 00 pm 

4 35 pm 

5 40 pm 

6 46 pm 

7 16 pm 

9 25 pm 
11 10 pm I 



Leave 
W. Sup'r 



6 46 am 

7 66 am 
9 10 am 

10 16 am 

1150 am 

128 pm 

2 30 pm 

3 40 pm 

3 45 pm 

4 15 pm 
4 50 pm 

6 66 pm 

7 00 pm 
7 30 pm 
9 45 pm 

1127 pm 



Arrive 
Superior 



652 am 

8 02 am 

9 17 am 

10 22 am 

11 57 am 

1 35 pm 

2 37 pm 

3 47 pm 

4 2,5 pm 
4 67 pm 
6U2 pm 
7 07 pm 



115 3 pm 



8CPERIOK TO DCLUTH. 



! Leave Leave 
I Superior W. Sup'r 



Dally 

Except Suiday... 

Dally 

Except Su iday. . . 
Except Suiday. .. 

Daily 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 

Daily 

Daily 

Daily 

Daily 

ExeeptSuaday... 

Daily 

Except Sunday. .. 



700 am 

"s'ldam 

9 26 am 

10 45 am 

1106 am 

12 35 pm 

1 46 pm 

25Upm 

4 06 pm 

5 05 pm 

'e'lO pm 

7 30 pm 

1146 pm 



6 46 am 

7 07 am 
7 40 am 
817 am 
9 32 am 

10 65 am 

11 15 am 

12 42 pm 
162 pm 
3U0pm 

4 16 pm 

5 12 pm 

6 10 pm 

6 17 pm 

7 30 pm 
1162 pm 



A't. ve 
Dulu b 

7 05 am 
7 23 am 

7 66 am 

8 35 am 

9 48 am 
11 10 am 

11 30 am 
100 pm 
2 07 pm 
315 pm 
4 30 pm 
6 30 pm 

6 26 pm 
6.36 pm 

7 45 pn. 

12 10 am 



St. Paul A Oalnth Short Line. 

Duluth to West 

Superior •6 35+8 90 8 46 MO 30 M2 00am 

Duluth to West 

Superior *240 446*+530 •860*+1000pm 

West Sui erlor 

toDulutt +*610 ^JSS 9 30*H015 •1116 am 

West Superior 

to Duluta •2 00 +240 350 •5 46 •teiO •«10pm 

•Daily. West Duluth only. 

Leave Di luth dally for Spirit Lake— 9:00 am, 
J^30 p m; n turning at 10:06 am and (tpm. 



St. Paul & Duluth Railroad. 



y « 

Through Passenger Service as "The Nortowest- 
ren Line" — C. St. P,, M. & O. R'y — and the 
Minneapolis, St. Paul and Chicago trains over 
this line have a better record for reaching 
either end of their run "on time" than those of 
any other line In the country. 



THE 



Well posted travelers between the Twin 
Cities and Chicago take this line— particularly 
favorlngthe "VestibuleLimited," which carries 
the finest sleeping cars and coaches ever built, 
and also all classes of passengers, without 
extra fares. On the Lalce Superior portion of 
the line, between Minneapolis, St. Paul and Du- 
luth, and St. Paul and Ashland, Pullman 
sleepers are run on night trains, and parlor 
cars on day trains. 



NORTHWESTERN 



Pullman sleepers are also run through between 
Duluth, Superior and Chicago. Fast through 
trains are also run between Minneapolis, St. 
Paul and Kansas City, via Sioux City, with 
through Pullman sleepers St. Paul to Omaha 
and Kansas City. Dining cars are run on all 
through trains over this line between Minneap- 
olis. SI. Paul and Chicago, and t>etween St. 
Paul and Kansas City. Besides being the best 



LINE 



Terms - Very - Adyantapous. 



I eave Dull th 

Arrive St. laul.. 
Ar Minnea jolls.. 

Ar Stlllwat.T 

Ar Mil waul ee 

Ar Chicago 

ArSt. Louis 

Ar Kansas ( Hty . . . 






r 
B 



8 00 am 
2 30 pm 

2 65 pm 

3 30 pm 

4 16 am 
7tX)am 
6 05 pm 
4 45 pm 



210 pm 
6|55pm 
7 20 pm 
7 06 pm 
6 45 am 
9 30 am 
5 05 pm 
4 45 pm 



25 



10 00 pm 

6 65 am 

7 15 am 

7 00 am 
+7 06 pm 
►+7 00 pm 

+9 30 am 

8 46 am 



between these principal cities, the Chicago & 
Northwestern system of lines composed of the 
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, 
' hicago & Northwestern and Fremont, Elkhom 
& Mo Valley Ry's (all advertised as the "North- 
western Line,") traverse a rich and populous 
country, and offers the best means of reaching 
all the territtory Intersected. Before selecting 
a route, travelers should get a folder, with a 
map of this line, and they will quickly seethe 
advantages offered. All particulars, with maps 
and time tables, may be obtained of 
„ „ . „„ GEO. M. SMITH, 

Qen'l Agent, 332 Hotel St. Louis Bldg. Duluth 
Or write to 
T. W. TEA80ALE, 

Qen'l Passenger Agttnt. St. P«ul 



NOTES 



tBzcept S inday— to other points dally. 



Northern Pacific Railroad. 



Dining Cars on Pacific 
Exp -ess Trains. 



j Leave Arrive 
Duluth Duluth 



tS°'Acreage near the city 
imits at below market prices. 



ADDRESS 



Pacific Express (limited) 
Pargo, H jlena, Butte, 



s 



-J 



Care of Herald, Duluth. 



for 
Ta- 
coma, Seattle and Portland, 
Grand Forts, Grafton, Win- 
nipeg 

Dakota Bxi ress, for Fergus 
Falls, VV ahpeton, ''argo^ 
Jamestowi i and intermediate 
points 

Chicago Exp ress, for Ashland, 
Milwaukee, Chicago and all 
Wisconsin Central and Mil- 
waukee. Li ike Shore & West- 
ern points 



Dally. 



3.30 pm 



7.16 pm 



4.00 pm 



Dally 



6.25 pm 



from the dlarj- of tourists, oom- 
merclal travelers, business 
men and others has revealed: 

That the Wisconsin Ckntk^l have the ua 
quaUfled endorsement of all: 



That the Wisconsin Central has today the 
most popular line between Minneapolis. 
ST. Paul, Duluth, AsblanD and Milwac- 
KX*. and Chicago: 



iiy adding 
Put 



That the Wisconsin Cintral is dally 
tolts admirer* as the recognized Pullman 
line between Minnaepolis, St. Paul Dd 
LUTH. Ashland, and Milwaukek and 'Chi- 
CAoe: 



7.65 am 



10.30aDi 



All trains dally. Through sleeper frow 
Duluth on lakota exprc^ss leaving at 7:15 p 
m. Free Colonist Sleepers are run on Paclflt 
Express leaving Duluth at 3:30 p. m 

JNO. C. KOBlNi^ON, 
Ticket Agent. Union Depot. 



That the Wisconsin Ckntral touches the 
most prominent points In Wisconsin, and 
and that it has more important busin ,«^ oem- 
ters on its through line than any other raiU 
way in the Nokthwkst: 



That the Wisconsin Ci.ntral has made envt- 



Sehvicb: 



I Gar 



Dnlutli , South Shore and Atlantic. 

Lea ves Dulu :h dally 930pia 

Arrives Kepiiblic. Mich 8;W am 

Arrives Ishicmiug. Mich 725aii! 

Arrives Negi.umn;, Mich 7 35am 

Arrives Mar luette. Mich 8 (16 am 

Arrives Saul ; Ste. Marie, Mich 1 36 pm 

Arrives OU a va. Out 11 46 am 

Arrives Mont real. Que 3Sl)pm 

Arrives Boston. Mass SaOam 

Al rives New York. N.T 700am 

ArrlyesDetDlt, Mich UlOun 



vnth^commodious and .fi^lnc'SroSuo^ 



lua. may ne deslnKl and tha't lK™.S[!2S 
Agents are specially instructed to l^k^Jw 

e«^nog«t Agent or to representatives of tti 
' Gener«lulunaB«r ^<i«ni^t^^« 







/ 




/: 




/ 



/ 





I 

/ 







— 





~ 
















































~- * — — -T 




























L . .Jti 






==s 
























1 






+ 



1^ 





•^baii^Mfa^iM 



Urn 




\ 



ACRES 

Near Short Line Park on railroad. 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 West Superior Street. 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD. 



Ns, 





FOK BARGAINS 


E. 


—SEE— 

C. HOLLIDAY, 




326 W. Superior Street. 
HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUiLDING. 



VOL. 7; NO. 238. 



DULUTH, MINN., i^'BIDAY, JANUAKY 10, 1890 



PKICB THBSE CENTS. 




Do You Want to Boffow Money? LAST EDITIOi. 



We can let you have it and without delay. 



MONEY ON HAND 



Provided you have sufficient security. 



Our Hates are the Lowest Obtainalile 



II POWERFUL SPEECH. 



Copious Extracts From Sena- 
tor Davis' Speech on 
the Sault. 



Gives the Startling Figures of 

the Commerce of 

Ouluth. 



Attentively Heard and Proba- 
bly Productive of 
Result. 



Applications for loans wanted at once in 



OULUia WEST DULUin OB WEST SUPERIOR 



Improved or Unimproved Property taken. 



URGE - DR - SI L - 





We have on hand $800, $ I 600 or $2400 

for a 



SNAP IN REAL ESTATE 



All cash. 




Real Estate, ht% and Business Piopeity a Specialty. 



Call and see what we have. 



FIRE 



INSURANCE. 



The best Foreign and American Companieis rep- 
resented. Policies correctly written. 



Stryker, Manley & Buck, 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 




Our Sixteenth Semi-lnnual Red Figure Sale. 

CLOTHING- 

The Men's and Boys' Clothing catches the bargain mania 
that now runs all over the store. Not because the clothing is 
old— it isn't; not that we are badly overstocked— we aren't; 
not on account of dull sales-"Sold more than last winter; but 
simply because we set out to make great sales this January, 
and bargain music is the only music for double quick sales in 
present traae conditions. 

MEN'S OVERCOATS. 

We are selling Fur-trimmed Overcoats at actual cost prices. 
The sorts for a mild winter are reduced in common with others. 

MEN'S STORM COATS. 

They will be needed yet, but to hurry your needs they come 
down today: $8 from $12; $12 from $16; $16 from $20; 
$20 from $25. 

BOYS' CAPE OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

Some special bargains in our Boys' and Children's Clothing 
Departments. We give you all the profits. 





WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



Washington, Jan. 1.0. — Senator Davis' 
(MiDDesota) speech on the Sault canal 
and Hay Lake improvement here yester- 
day has created great interest, and the 
figures and facts of lake commerce, and 

I especially that at Duluth, have been 
gone over carefully. 

It is believed here that the general 
trend of intention is toward passing the 
bills, appropriating $3,738,865 for the 
canal and 81,t>84,115 for Hay Lake chan- 
nel. Tthough the bills establish a bad 
precedent, and are unusual, the demand 
is felt to be unusual also. Following are 
extracts from the speech: 

Early in the present session the sena- 
tor from Ohio presented to the senate 
the petition of the board of trade of 
Cleveland, upon a subject of the great 
est importance to the people of the 
Xorthwest. In a more remote but 
scarcely less important degree it involves 
the general welfare. It is not merely of 
present importance. Great as that im- 
portance is, a wise consideration of a 
future that is very near, vastly increases 
it. That subject is the improvement at 
the falls of the St. Marys river, the 
deepening of Hay Lake channel. The 
petition is that the total amount required 
for the completion of these indispensable 
avenues of traffic be at once placed at the 
disposal of the war department, to the 
end that the work may be prosecuted to 
completion within the shortest time 
possible. Similar petitions have since 
been presented from the chambers of 
commerce of St. Paul and Duluth. The 
distance from the city of New York to 
Duluth, at the head of Lake Superior, is 
14tX) miles, of which 800 miles are dpep 
water nav gation by way of the great 
lakes. The only outlet from Lake Su- 
perior is the St. Marys river. The fall 
is twenty feet and of this eighteen feet 
are at the lock. The only channel now 
navigable is for the first thirty-five miles 
below that place so tortuous that passage 
through it at night is unsafe and is not 
attempted. For the remainder of the 
distance the navigation is good. 

Michigan in 18.')2 began the first lock 

at the Sault. This had two chambers, 
each 70 feet wide, 350 feet long and it 
piissed vessels of a maximum draft of 

II feet. This was opened for business 
m 1855. The first year's tonnage 
through the lock was 100,000 tons. In 

1880 It was 1,70C>,000 tons. As early as 
1SG5 the necessity of a new lock of 
greatly increased capacity became mani- 
fest. This lock was constructed by the 
United States and was opened Sept. 1, 
1881. It is 515 feet long, 80 feet wide 
with 17 feet of water. This great work 
of engineering has served most admir- 
ably its purposes. The increased 
depth of water made it possible to 
increase the carrying capacity of vessels. 
This aueumentation began immediate- 
ly and has continued. The average reg- 
istered capacity of these vessels was 7tJl 
tons in 1885. In 1889 it h&u risen to 905 
tons — an increase of 20i tons in five 
years. But it was perceived as early as 

1881 that the yearly tonnage would soon 
exceed the capacity of the lock, and 
accordingly congress Dec. 29, 1881, re- 
quested from the war department infor- 
mation "as to what additional works 
were necessary on the St. Marys river 
to complete the improvements thereof 
in a manner to serve the interests of 
the commerce of the Northern 
lakes. Work was begun in 
1886 on the third canal, 800 feet long, 
100 feet wide with 21 feet of water on 
the miter sills; overcoming the differ- 
ence of level. The work was begun and 
81,000,000 was appropriated. The esti- 
mated cost is §4,738,805. Deducting the 
sum expended up to the present time, 
the estimated amount required for com- 
pletion is 1^3,738,865. 

In 1888* the tonnage of New Orleans 
was 1,148,648, both ways. In that year 
the tonnage through the canal was 6,- 
414,423 tons. Another comparison: The 
total registered tonnage entered and 
leared in all ports of the United States 
ft om and to foreign countries in 1888 was 
31,062,007 tons. In the same year the 
reg> stered tonnage through this look was 
6,20C\000 tons. Of this, 11,230,813 tons 
entei ed and cleared at the port of New 
York- -less than one-half more than the 
tonnag*^ through this lock. The mer- 
chandist' that passed through the lock in 
1888, was greater in value than that of 
the total i mports or exports of any Am- 
erican city except New Y'ork. 

The senator here gave full statistics of 
the commerce of Duluth in 1889. 

The Suez canal cost 1^100,000,000. It 
is the highwa.v of all nations. Yet its 
daily tonnage for the year 1888 was less 
than that of the Sault canal. The aver 
age for Suez was 18,191 tons daily, while 
the daily average of the Sault Ste. Marie 
canal was 30,242 tons. 

The general benefit of this work can- 
not be questioned. Its especial and im- 
mediate importance to the country west 
and southwest from Lake Superior is 
such as to entitle the demands of that 
region for' its speedy construction to the 
most liberal construction. 

NOTICE TO THE HOUSE. 

Judee Kelly's Colleague Announced UU 
Ueatk in a Feelintr Tribute. 

Wa-shington, Jan. 10.— Immediately 
after the reading of The Journal of the 
house this morning Mr. O'Neill of 
Pennsylvania, said: "I rise to announce 
to memljers of the house the death of 
my dear colleague, Hon. Wm. D. Kelly. 
I need not say Mr. Speaker that this is 



4 



I 



\ 



the saddest duty that has ever devolved 
upon me since my connection with the 
bouse. The death of Judge Kelly takes 
from me the longest acquaintance of my 
public life; an intimrte friendly ac- 
quaintance never marred for one mo- 
ment of time. 

"I cannot today express my feelings 
and my thoughts on the death of this 
distinguished man known, not only 
throughout this country, but, in my 
opinion, perhaps better known through- 
out the world than almost any man in 
public life today for his services to his 
country, for his strong mind, for his 
working capacity, and for all that ap- 
pertains to a faithful regresentative for 
nearly thirty years in the house of rep- 
resentatives of the United States. 

"I will take occasion, Mr. Speaker, to 
ask the house in the near future to des- 
ignate a day when its members may ex- 
press their feelings in commemoration 
of the deceased member." 



"Fattier of the House." 
Washington-, Jan. 10.— The honored 
title of "Father of the Hou8e,"which the 
late Judge Kelley has borne for many 
years, has by his death descended to 
another Philadelphia member, Mr. Ran- 
dall. Still another Philadelphian, Mr. 
O'Neill, entered congress at the same 
time that Mr. Randall did, but failed of 
re-election one term. 



WASHINGTON'S CLAIMS. 



But If She Don't Get tlie Fair She'll Help 
m°ho Does. 

Washington, Jan. 10. — Second hearing 
on the selection of a site for the quadri- 
centennial exposition was held this 
morning in the ladies reception room in 
the senate wing of the Capitol, when the 
claims of the city of Washington were 
presented. There were present of the 
committee. Senators Hiscock (chairman), 
Hawley, Farwell, Wilson of Iowa, Col- 
quitt, Ransom and Vest. 

Mr. Douglas, one of the district com- 
missioners, staled the order in which ar- 
guments would be presented, and closed 
his remarks by saying ..hat if it snould 
be concluded to hold the exposition else- 
where than in the national capital the 
citizens of the District of Columbia 
would make every exertion, by money or 
otherwise, to make it a magnificent suc- 
cess. 

Leather Men Object. 
Washington, Jan. lO.^The proposi- 
tion to raise thedutyondegras — a grease 
used exclusively by manufacturers of 
leather —from 10 to 50 per cent, has 
aroused violent opposition on the part of 
leather men throughout the country, and 
senators and members of the house are 
receiving remonstrances by every mail. 
The proposed increase is said to hfive 
been fathered by a New York corpora- 
tion, which has a monopoly of menhaden 
oil, and consequently is anxious to keep 
the foreign product out of the country. 

Kelley's Old Desk. 

Washington, Jan. 10. — ^ Draped in 
sombre black and adorned with a simple 
bouquet of white rtowers, the desk so 
long occupied by Mr. Kelley of Pennsyl- 
vania, this morning reminded the mem- 
bers of the house that the "father of the 
house" had departed from their midst. 

Tough on Prexle. 

Washincston, Jan. 10. — The Presi- 
dent's visitors this morning included the 
entire Chicago World's fair delegation, 
headed by Senator Farwell and Mayor 
Cregier. 



BRICE'LL GET 'EM. 



If the Three Have Their Price Cal Brice is 
All Right. 

( ^UMBis, Jan. 10. — Notwithstanding 
tb act that Cal Brice received the un 
i jous vote of the caucus be must be 
t eated for the senate, owing to the 
that the democrats have only five 
u -ity on joint ballot, one of which is 
Km >f Defiance, who is now dead, and 
Lawk Franklin, who is not expected 
to livt tirough the day, and three of 
which majority, Munson of Licking, 
Kounts of Shelby and Smith of Frank- 
lin, did not attend the caucus. 

It will be readily seen, if these three 
members fail to support the nominee of 
the caucus, the state of Ohio may be 
represented by a republican in the sen- 
ate. 

FLOWER S IN JA NUARY. 

A Warm Winter .Story; Heavy Snow .Storm 
at Citeboygan. 

GAI.IO.N, O., Jan. 10. — Sprigs of jelly 
flowers were plucked yesterday from the 
garden of the Rev. O. Wisner, in this 
city, as a result of the remarkably warm 
weather, the second time this winter. 
The jelly flower plant of the summer 
disappeared with the fall frosts, but the 
warm, spring-like weather caused it to 
shoot forth and bud again. Numerous 
daodelions, wild flowers and blossoms 
from peach, cherry and apple trees have 
been plucked. Easter flower shoots are 
peeping out of the ground in many 
gardens. 

Cheuovg.\.n, Mich., Jan. 10. — A heavy 
westerly storm set in this morning, and 
much snow has already fallen. Some of 
the camps were about breaking up for 
want of snow, and many lumbermen 
were decidedly blue at the outlook. 
They will all renew operations with a 
rush. 

Special of Camp 10. 
Chicago, Jan. 10. — A special meeting 
of Camp 20, of the Clan-na Gael, has 
been called for tonight, and it is given 
out this morning that John F. Beggs 
will be re-elected senior guardian by 
acclamation. The memliers of the camp 
claim that by their verdict acquitting 
Beggs, the members of the jury com- 
pletely vindicated it from all responsi- 
bility for the death of Dr. Cronin and 
repudiated the theory of an inner circle 
or a secret tribunal. The Cronin ele- 
ment is manifesting considerable in- 
dignation over the activity of their 
opponents, and tiiere is talk of calling a 
mass meeting to publicly denounce those 
responsible for the resuscitation of the 
notorious camp. 

Tlie IlliuoiH FIoo<1h .\galn. 

Chicago, Jan. 10. — Special dispatches 
state that many farms in southern Illi- 
nois are almost submerged with water, 
the result of the long-continued rainfall. 
Thousands of bushels of corn in that 
part of the state remain ungathered 
owing to the fact that the farmers have 
been unable to drive into their fields to 
make the harvest. Much ill health has 
been caused by damp weather and the 
stagnant water. 

Come We«t For Timber. 

Boston, Jan. 10. — The committee of 
the Warren avenue Baptist church, 
which was appointed to go to Chicago 
and extend a call to liev. George Lori- 
mer, has returned but without any as- 
surance of acceptance. 



In order to give everjbody a chance 
to participate in the benefits of our 
great holiday reduction sale, I have 
decided to continue it for the balance of 
this month. Don't miss the opportunity 
to get reliable goods at away-down 
prices. Sale closes positively Friday, 
Jan. 31. Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 



^-^ 



CAUGHT IN A CAISSON. 



Sixteen Men Killed After a 

Most Frantic Fight for 

Their Lives. 



The Engineer's Testimony; 

and Possibly Drunk 

Careless. 



Description of the Trap by One 

Who Escaped; Those 

Dead. 



LouisviiXiE, Ky., Jan. 10. — At 12:20 
o'clock this morning the bodies of three 
of the unfortunate victims of the caisson 
accident of the late afternoon were re" 
covered by workmen. The positions in 
which they were found showed that a 
desperate struggle had taken place at 
the narrow door of escape. 

One negro had succeeded in pulling 
his body through the aperture, but 
death had overtaken him just when life 
was promised. Another negro had 
crawled partly through. His hands 
were fastened by death in the clothing 
of the negro, in front of him, showing 
that he had died in a desperate endeavor 
to escape first Between these two was 
the body of a white man. It ap- 
peared from his position that he was 
trying to push back some one who was 
clinging to his legs. Saod accumulat- 
ing at the door by the sudden sinking 
of the caisson, had wedged in the body 
of this man in such a manner that it 
oould not be removed. 

Of the twenty men in thecassion when 
the flooding was first noticed Aoe Tay- 
lor, Frank Haddock. Lewis Couch and 
James Morrill succeeded in reaching tho 
manhole shaft and escaped. Among 
those dead are: 

Thomas .lohnson, Loii Roe, John Knox, fore- 
man; Frank Mayor. JYod Soaper, Jo8ei)h Me- 
Adams, Tom Ash, H. A. Milton Morris, W. E. 
Haynd, Ri-ulrt.ni Tyler, i'hris Cliilib. Thomas 
Smith, John (iordou, Lewis (V)x, Poter Taylor. 

One of the survivors tells the following 
story. The men were at work in the 
soft bottom of the river. They 
made such rapid progress that 
the excavation went down faster 
than the caisson. This afternoon an un- 
usual quantity of water began to trickle 
from under the edges, but the pumps 
were at work and no increase was felt. 
Gradually it increased until suddtsnly on 
every side a flood gushed in. The men 
realized their peril, and all rushed for 
the exits. Immediately around the 
little trap door frantic unfortunates 
fought, all knowing that but a few of 
them could pass through before the air 
chamber was completely filled by the 
water. Only one could go through at a 
time and as one man gained a pre- 
eminence, he w as snatched by his fren- 
zied companions and drawn back. Mean- 
while the flood rose and all who were 
after Taylor were drowned. 

The accident occured late yesterday 
afternoon, and was in the excavation 
for a fill in the Ohio river for a bridge 
between Louisville and Jeffersonville. 
The men were caught by a sudden burst 
of water and were drowned. Engines 
and workmen were put to work 
trying to pump out the water, repair 
the break and extricate the men. The 
caisson proper is twelve feet 
under water and is reached by a 
manhole shaft, which projects above 
the water's surface. This shaft is 
reached by four trap doors from the in- 
terior of the caisson. Shortly before 6 
o'clock, while they were excavating in 
the bottom, water burst under the sides 
and edge of the huge machine, and 
the unfortunate workmen were caught 
in a trap. 

Mr. Ingle, resident engineer of the 
bridge company, was seen. He ex- 
pressed the opinion that some one was 
evidently to blame for not having the 
trap door in proper condition and also 
for the weakness of the caisson, which 
resulted in the leak. The timekeeper 
on duty yesterday afternoon said: 

"There was nothing to be seen from 
the outside that would indicate what 
had taken place. There was no noise or 
commotion and the first intimation we 
had that an accident had occurred was 
when four men appeared at the top of 
the lock and shouted to the engineer to 
turn in more air to keep back water. The 
engine was set going at great speed and 
a great quantity of air was forced into 
the caisson and we could see millions of 
bubbles on the surface of the water, 
which indicated that the air was not 
being confined to the box. I do not 
know who is to blame or what caused 
the accident." 

An employe who had been sick for 
several days, but who is one of the lock- 
keepers and who declined to give his 
name, said he knew Knox was 
to blame; that Knox was reck- 
less and often under the influence 
of liquor. 



started a Diphtheria Kpldeiuic. 

Sprinofielu, 111., Jan. 10. — The state 
board of health today received a com- 
munication from the Ohio state board 
complaining that the people of Zanes- 
ville, Ohio, were suffering from ai; epi- 
demic of diphtheria which followed the 
exposure of the corpse of a child, the 
daughter of Henry B. Tuttle, shipped 
from Chicago. The child died of diph- 
theria, but the health certificate neces- 
sary to accompany the corpse when 
shipped stated the cause of death to be 
heart failure and blood poisoning, and 
was marked not contagious. The cer- 
tificate bore the name of Dr. S. P. 
Hedges, and as a number of, deaths have 
resulted from the exposure of the corpse 
the Ohio board ask that the Illinois 
board take steps toward the prosecution 
of the physician signing the certificate 
for making a false statement as to the 
cause of death. 



She .Sayx She Will. 
Wilmington, Del., Jan. 10. — Miss Ellen 
Bayard, the youngest daughter of the 
ex-secretary of state, today verified the 
report of her engagement to Count R. A. 
Lewinhaupt of Sweden. Miss Bayard 
is 21 ye^» of age. The prospective 
?room is 35 years old, and tall and hand- 
some, and is at present undergoing a full 
course in practical mechanics at the car 
and shipbuilding plant of Hnrlan & IIol- 
lingsworth, this city. The wedding will 
probably take place next June at the 
Bavard homestead here. 



We have the best bargain ever offered 
on First street. One lot, 50x1 10 feet, 
only $1300; half cash, balance one and 
two years. 

D. H. Stkvenson & Co.. 

13 Exchange building. 



COL. DUDLEY BETTER. 

A Paralytic Stroke Takes the St. Paul & 
Duluth OfHcial Near Death'ii Door. 

St. Paul, Jan. 10. [Special.]— Col. E. 
]j. Dudley, vice-president of the St. Paul 
& Duluth railroad, who was taken down 
last night by a paralytic stroke, is some- 
what better. He can now speak and 
move, and there are hopes of his re- 
covery. Mr. Dudley was during the 
night thought to be dying of laryngeal 
paralysis, and his physician said be could 
not live more than a few .hours. His 
sister, Mrs. L. D. Garth of St. Louis, is 
on her way to St. Paul. Mr. Dudley was 
attacked with the grip a few days ago, 
which developed into paralysis of the 
larynx. 

He was born In Danville, Ky., Jan . 16, 1845, 
and has been In the railway service gince 1867. 
He was with the St. Louis, Iron Mountain & 
St)ulhern from lf<70 to 18l«. going next to the 
i'exas Si, Paciflc, first as superintendent and 
then as general manager. In 18MJ he became 
general manager of the Central Iowa and in 
IfNKS general manager of the St. I'aul Si, Duluth. 
where he has since served with great credit to 
the road. 

AT A FUNERAL. 

It Nearly Causes Several Others in a Uil- 
waukee Procession. 

Milwaukee, Jan. 10. — A serious acci- 
dent occurred at a funeral near this city. 
When passing the stone quarry where 
there is a steep hill alongside of which 
the road leads, the last team of horses in 
the procession was startled by a passing 
train and soon became so unmanageable 
that the boy who was driving could not 
control them, and they dashed on along 
the line until they reached a carriage 
owned by P. Vanlare and containing four 
ladies. 

The driver of the coupe attempted to 
get out of the way, but did not succeed, 
and as the runaway team struck the car- 
riage it tipped over and crasheil to the 
stone bottom, twelve or thirteen feet 
below. 

Two ladies were picked up bleeding 
and unconscious, while the other two 
were more or less injured. Mrs. Van- 
nard was most severely injured. She 
was wounded about the head and face 
and received bad cuts from the broken 
glass of the coach windows. Mrs. 
George Hays also received serious injur- 
ies. Mrs. J. Chalker sustained painful 
injuries. The driver of the hack fell 
under the horses and came out with a 
broken arm. 



KNIGHTS AT MILWAUKEE. 

Preparations tor the Kncaiupment to be 
Held Next July. 

Milwaukee, Wis., Jan. 10. -The Pyth- 
ian delegation to examine into the pre- 
liminarj' arrangements already made for 
the holding of the grand conclave in 
this city next July arrived here at 1 1 
o'clock this forenoon from Chicago. 
When the train reached the depot an 
engine was coupled to the sjjecial car, 
and as soon as the local committee got 
on board the car w^as taken to Cool 
Spring park, where the delegation got 
off and looked over the grounds proposed 
for the camp next summer. 

After a dinner this evening at the resi- 
dence of W. C. Williams the delegation 
held a largely attended public reception 
at the Pythian hall. Gen. Carnahan 
made a short address, in which he said 
that they would come to Milwaukee 
next July with from 18,000 to 20,000 
uniformed knights, and that the parade 
would be the grandest sight ever seen in 
Milwaukee. He thought the conclave 
would attract over 100,000 strangers to 
tjie city. 

A STRA NGE S UICIDE. 

A. N. Klklus of St. Paul; No Kxplanation of 
His Deed. 

St. Paul, Jan. 10. — A strange suicide 
was that of James N. Elkins. For twenty 
years he has been the trusted book- 
keeper of the Northwestern Express, 
Stage & Transportation company of St. 
Paul. Four years ago he married a lady 
in Boston and brought her home with 
him. An apparently pleasant home and 
a family of two has been tho result. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elkins had arranged to 
go to the theater, but at the last moment 
decided for some unknown reason not to 
go. A half hour later a pistol shot was 
heard. When the affrighted lady reached 
her husband's side she found to her 
horror that he had shot himaelf. He 
was still breathing, but life ebbed slowly 
away, and an hour and a half later he 
expired. 

TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL 



Convention of the Itrirklayers and Masons 
I'niou; Many Delegates. 

Kansas City, Mo., Jan. 10. — The 
twenty-fourth annual convention of the 
Bricklayers and Masons International 
union of America opened here today 
with a large attendance of delegates 
from the leading centers of this country 
and Canada. 

The reports of the officers show a large 
increase in the membership during the 
past year, and indicate that the organ- 
ization is in a flourishing condition. 
The action to be taken regarding the 
eight hour movement to be inaugurated 
in May next is among the most impor- 
tant of the questions on the program. 



AH but One Confessed. 

Fort Smith, Ark., Jan. 10. — Of the 
nine murderers now in the federal jail 
who are to be hanged on Thursday, the 
16th, all but one have made professions 
of religion and made confessions of their 
crime. That one is George Tober, a 
young negro, who holds out that he is 
innocent. Seven of the nine are full- 
blooded Indians. As all are aggravated 
cases it is quite likely the whole nine will 
hang. 

Fatal Kxplosion of a Itlast Furnace. 

Pittsburg, Pa., Jan. 10.— While drill- 
ing out some scaffolding at the Lucky 
blast furnace shortly after noon today, 
the molten metal broke tt rough the 
"tape" and an explosion followed. 
Thomas Welch, a workman, was in- 
stantly killed; Mike Welch fatally in- 
jured, and a number of others seriously 
burned. The castinghouse was badly 
damaged by fire. The loss is not known. 

CONDENSED PELEGRAPH. 



In New York state last j ear 49,956 
men were convicted, and fi^&i women. 

On Washington's birthday Princeton 
college will endeavor to determine, 
whether, in these times, ballot reform is 
more imix)rtant than civil service re- 
form. 

Cattle losses in Wyoming will be the 
heaviest known for years, owing to the 
deep snow. 

The big dry goods house of F. R. Law- 
ler & Co. of Chicago has failed. It is 
believed its liabilities will reach ^100,000. 

Gen. Schofield has fixed the hours for 
meals in the army. Twenty minutes 
each are given to breakfast and supper, 
and thirty for dinner. 

Zimri and Betsey Pond of Huron, S. 
D., celebrated their sixty-first wedding 
anniversary yesterday. Mr. Pond is 83 
and his wife 82. 



J. A. BoggB offers lots near-Hazel wood 
at low prices and easy terms. Laboring 
men can obtain houses in that neighbor- 
hood, by applying at his office. 



TO mB[l) NAPOLfON 



PERSONAL. 



Comniennorate Death of Na- 
poleon Third, Seventeen 
Years Ago. 



Eight Hours Labor Conceded 

in Germany; Foreign 

Notes. 



LOND 

teenth 

poleon 

was fit 

borougl 

great i 

mausol) 

church 

private 

genie. 

A pri 
in the 
by the 
the ex-< 
bers of 
ent. i 
mass, t( 
were ii 
filled to 

The 
hidden 
floral o 
been s- 
Englaa 
token w 
immort 
autogra 
affected 
turning 
apartm( 
for the 

This 
ing me 
was celt 



ON, Jan. 10. — This is the seven- 
inniversary of the death of Na- 
III, and the memorable event 
(ingly commemorated at Farn- 
1, where the remains of the once 
uler repose in the magnificent 
)um attached to the memorial 
which was erected last year in 
grounds by the ex-Empress Eu- 

r-ate requiem mass was celebrated 
church at 5 o'clock this morning 
brothers of the Capuchin order, 
mpress and the immediate mem- 
ber household alone being pres- 
et 10 o'clock there was a second 
I which friends and neighbors 
vited, and the little church was 
overflowing. 

;omb in the crypt was almost 
from sight by a profusion of 
fferings and wreaths which had 
>nt by sympathetic friends in 
I and France. Queen Victoria's 
as a large wreath of laurel and 
slles, with a card bearing her 
ph. The ex-empress was greatly 
during the services, and, on re- 
to her residence, retired to her 
ints anci denied herself to visitors 
remainder of the day. 
afternoon a mass for the surviv- 
nbers of the Napoleonic family 
ibrated. 



EICiHT HO URS C ONCEDED 

To Miners in Geruiany; Believed France 
ind Kelgium Will Follow. 

New i'ouK, Jan 10.— Infcrmatioo has 
been received by members of tl^e Feder- 
ation of Labor to the effect ttoit as a re- 
sult of 1 he international conference of 
miners jeld in Paris last summer, the 
eight hour system has been conceded to 
the miners in nearly every part of Ger- 
many. 

It is lielieved that, within a few weeks, 
the example will be followed by the col- 
liery proprietors of France and Belgium, 
and in this event the English and Scotch 
miners vill secure the eight-hour shift 
for whi(h they are now agitating with- 
out difli^ulty, in addition to the three 
advances of 10 per cent each which they 
have secured within the past twelve 
months. 



OrTA^ 

governn 
for sail 
being 
Federal 
the sail 
exclusiv 
Canada, 
fused tc 
Domini' 
ter into 



Uows With Its Province. 
kA, Ont., Jan. 10. The Quebec 
lent has sold a number of leases 
non fishing, several Americans 
imong the purchasers. The 
autliorities had requested that 
I be postponed, as they claimed 
e jurisdiction over all fisheries in 
but the Quebec government re- 
acknowledge the claim, and the 
m authorities will carry the mat- 
the courts. 



Madk 
suffered 
during ' 
decreas* 
slight i 
Three n 
night fc 
cided tc 
King's 1 

A COD 

3::K) o'cl 
Regent, 
and we| 
vulsivee 
King, ai 
issued 8 
quietly. 

LoND 

written 

publish 

nay, adc 

forgery. 

thinks, 

convino 

ine. 



The Sick King. 

ID, Jan. 10. — The infant King 
from another cardiac attack 
he night, but later the attack 
(d in severity and there was a 
mprovement in his condition, 
lore doctors were summoned last 
r consultation. The doctors de- 
increase the quantity of the 
ood. 

Bultation of physicians held at 
Qck lasted an hour. The Queen 
the King's mother, was pre.sent 
it profusely. At 5 o'clock re- 
were applied to the head of the 
id later, blisters. A bulletin just 
bates that the King is resting 



Calls It a Forgery. 

DN, Jan 10.— Mr. Parnell has 
a letter stating that the letter 
jd under his name on Wednes- 
Iressed to the Ennis board is a 
The internal evidence, he 
should have been suflicient to 
) anyone that it was not genu- 



Tlie Arab-German Squabble. 
Berl n, Jan. 10.— A dispatch from 
Zanziba r states that fears are entertained 
there that Banaberi has captured Lieut. 
Gravenieuth of Major Wiseman's com- 
mand and two other Cjerman officers. 



Scotland's Pig Booui. 

Gi.AS( !OW, Jan. 10. — There was a col- 
lapse in the pig iron market here today 
owing to large selling orders. Scotch 
warrants have fallen Is. and Cleveland 
warrants Is., and a further decline is ex- 
pected. 



Lying In State. 
Bebun, Jan. 10. — The body of Em- 
press Augusta is lying in state in the 
chapel cf the schloss, and the chapel has 
been op med to the public. 



Dancing and Deportment. 

Prof, .lames S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No. ll.'S 
West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; ge its', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents', 
Wednes lays, at 8 p. m. 



The Herald bindery has the beet 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



Mr. J. Pilkey has returned from a trip 
to Wisconsin. 

Mr. 1. Freimuth has been severely ill 
for three days. 

Mrs. liupley gave a pleasant dinner 
party yesterday. 

Mr. liobert L. Dulaney is expected 
from Virginia tomorrow. 

Mr. G. M. Smith, local agent of the 
Omaha, is sick with the grip. 

Mr. F. H. Cutting returned yesterday 
from a three weeks' vacation trip in the 
East. 

Mr. George C. Greenwood returned to- 
day from a visit at Marquette and lower 
Michigan points. 

Mr. J. C. iiubinson left for St. Paul to- 
day to attend the funeral of a friend, a 
victim of iufiuenza. 

Jutin Mueller, of the firm of Mueller 
Bros., left for Iowa today to visit his 
relatives and friends. 

President Thomas H. Shevelin of the 
Hall «!t Ducey Lumber company of Min- 
neapolis is in Dululh. 

Mrs. Charles McEachron left yester- 
day to spend several weeks at her old 
home at Saginaw, Mich. 

Messrs. E. S. Hammond and F. H. 
Quinby started Monday for a three 
months' visit to the Pacific coast. 

Secretary Phelps left to<lay for Red 
Wing, where he will deliver an address 
before the Red Wing Commercial college 
reunion. 

Miss Rose Forsythe has been ap- 
ix)inted assistant stenographer to Judd 
Stearns, and is on duly in Judge En- 
sign's court. 

Mr. R. Lawrence, a prominent Tower 
merchant and proprietor of tlie skating 
riuk in thut viilaue, came down on busi- 
ness this morning. 

Mr. E. E. Carrier left today for Bay 
City, Mich., on a brief visit. From 
there he travels South in the interests 
of the Duluth Manufacturing company. 

Mr. John E. Fuller returned yesterday 
from a visit at his old home in Clinton, 
Mass. He reports Clinton people as en- 
thusiastic over Duluth from a continued 
perusal of The Weekly Herald. 

Mr. J. D. O'Connell "btreet commis- 
sioner," has just returned from a visit to 
Toronto, and other parts of Ontario. 
He has made a lasting imijression among 
telephone people and city oUicials down 
there. 

Swamper Caribou, the well-known 
Indian guide and explorer, who cut his 
knee with an axe some weeks ago has 
been having a tight wrestle with death, 
but has come out on top. Through lack 
of any medical attendance his injured 
leg has been deprived of nearly every 
vestige of flesh, and for several "days his 
death was expected. His strong consti- 
tution siived him and h-i will probably 
get well. 

Mr. W. W. Bill of the grain firm of W. 
W. Bill k. Co., left today for Fargo, where 
he will spend several days with hia 
family. He expects to bring his family 
to Dulutu before long. 

Manager Haycock is on deck again 
after a severe wrestle with Russian la 
gripi)e. He was confined to his room 
several days. 

Register Besome. 

At Tlie Spalding: ^>ed de Mena, A. 
Lowenburg, A. Klinger, New York; H. 

D. Bowen, E. D. Middaugh, W. H. 
Butick, J. M. Forest, F. W. Nast, E. T, 
J>odge, A. F. McArthur, C. L. Gould, 
Sl.Paul; I. Abraham, John Kraft, J. W. 
Sheanwald, T. Connelly Jr.," Thomas H. 
Shevlin, Minneapolis; F. F. Freeman, 

E. D. Wickwire, Chicago; A. H. Lam- 
bert, Cleveland. 

At the St. Jjouis: A. Melone, Toledo; 
C. C. Baylon, Cleveland; T. P. Sheldon, 
Cloquet; H. Wallstin, New York; J. H. 
Greene, Waterville, Wis., J. S. Metcalf, 
J. E. Underwood, Chicago; Byron Has- 
kitt, Faribault; J. H. Martin, Anoka; 
J. H. Brown, St. Paul. 

At the Merchants: Mat Smith, 
Tower; N. Johnson, Seattle; John 
Spreichler, S\. Turner, W. H. Kent, St. 
Paul; A. J. Filiatrault, Two Harbors. 

CITY BRIEFS. 



Geo. Booker was b_mmoned this 
afternoon on complaint of C. H. Harvey 
of the Humane society, for cruelty to a 
horse. 

A feature of next week's concert at 
the Bethel will be a sextet of four la- 
dies and two gentlemen. Those who will 
take the parts have not yet been 
selected. 

Bishop McGolrick has just received a 
tine parrot, a magnificent bird with r«- 
marka'jle conversational powers. This 
parrot i.s the bishop's especial pet. 

City Attorney S. L. Smith has re- 
turned from St. Paul where he went to 
confer with the chief justice regarding 
the Park Point quo warranto case which 
was dismissed a few days ago in the 
supreme court. Mr. Smith obtained 
from the chief justice an order compel- 
ling the respondents to show cause why 
the case should not be reinstated. 

Travel over Northwestern roads has 
increased 2.3 per cent since the low Chi- 
cago rates went into effect. 

There is considerable activity in acre- 
age along St. Louis river between West 
Duluth and Thomson. 

In yesterday's run to Duluth the Ze- 
nith City Short line train made fifty- 
five miles an hour at times. 

The Spalding is averaging tifty ar- 
rivals a day. 

Most of the Twin city Catholics who 
escorted Bishop McGijlrick to this city 
yesterday returned home over the East- 
ern at noon today. 

The front to the Hoppman building 
will be finished this week. 

A gentleman riding over Fourth street 
yesterday said he counted twenty three 
dogs between Lake avenue and First 
avenue east. 



Attention, Uutchers! 

A carload of light dressed hogs jiut 
received at Clark & Metz. 



If you want to make money quick 
call on Merritt Sa ' Leddell, room 4 
Fargusson building. 



REAL ESTATE 



Special Bargains I Snaps. 

3 Lois in Endion, $4500. 

2 Lots.in Highland Park, $2500. 
2C Acres in I 0-50- 1 4 at a bargain. 
63 Lots adjoining London, cheap. 



A few of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale ori easy ternns. 

Tventy acres on the hill at a great bargain. 



J. M. ROOT & CO., 



Room 9, Metropolitan Block. 



> V* * « ■* ! » ' - 



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J3»^ThM WashingrtoD office of The Herald Is 
»t l-l:i4 New Vi>rk avunue, N. W., »hf re the 
puper is kept ou tllf and where The Herald 
corru«i>oiideut will welcome rlsitora from the 
Northwest. 



The Herald has closed arrangements 
for the most complete telegraphic serv- 
ice of any newspaper in the Xorthwest 
outside of the Twin cities and will from 
this time on give full reports of all the 
latest news of the country, besides cov- 
ering the local Held as efficiently as pos- 
sible. Now is the time to subscribe. 
Apply to business office for sample 
copies. 




DULUTH EVEKTNG TTIffnAT.n JAXTJABY 10 1890. 



Two sufferers on the senate committee 
have already expressed their belief that 
the exposition cannot well come off be- 
fore ISD.'S, and it is more likely that 
others will drop to the same persuasion 
than that they will be brought back to 
1892. Judging from some of the per- 
formances of the senate, touching water- 
way improvements in particular, it is no 
wonder that two years has come to seem 
too short a time for doing much of any- 
thing. 



THEIR INNERMOST THOUGHTS. 



If the report that a Chicago line is 
pro rating with the Burlington & North- 
ern road proves true, the Soo line will 
put on a 810 rate from St. Paul to 
Boston, the lowest charge for travel that 
has ever been made in the Xorthwest. 



SEEN AND HEARD. 



THE BISHOP'S RECEPTION. 

The reception of the Hrst bishop of the 
diocese of Ouluth yesterday was in- 
eritably an occasion of moment and in- 
terest to the city out* ide of the circle of 
the welcoming church. So much is 
there that a bishop fully alive to the 
calls of the trust condded to him can do 
for the welfare and right building up of 
the whole city. For the right man there 
is assuredly a golden opportunity not 
alone to establii^h and maintain a truly 
great foundation of his church at the 
head of the lakes, but to make his in- 
fluence a moving power for good through- 
out the length and breadth of the city 
and in every department of its manifold 
life. And we are glad to be persuaded 
from what we have heard of the incom- 
ing bishop and from what we hear from 
his own lips in his utterances here that 
he is the right man — one whose ministry 
here will be of honor to his church, of 
benefaction to the city and of enduring 
satisfaction to himself. 

In the words that breathe his spirit 
we have assurance that it is indeed truly 
Catholic, that he does not seek to con- 
fine the limitJ3 of the church universal, 
that he will hold the right hand of fel- 
lowship stretched out to him by every 
worker for good w^hatever his creed 
may be or may not be. On one all-com- 
prehending and comprehensible plane, 
the brotherhood of man, he stands with 
all, and from this plane he can and will 
work for all and, we trust, with all, in 
the building up of the city of his hope 
and ours. In word and deed and life, 
he can put to shame meanness, 
and bigotry and unfaithfulness to 
duty and all things dishonorable 
and uplift humanity, liberality, devotion 
to truth, patriotism, enlightened public 
spirit and all things honorable. He has 
made it manifest too that be stands be- 
hind none in his anticipation of the fu- 
ture of the city and that he needs no in- 
centive to do bis best to draw it 
near and make it bright The universality 
and warmth of his welcome here is an 
auspicious opening of his life among us. 
It is io his pjwer and will, we believe, to 
make all glad that they are living within 
the bounds of his diocese. 



A TIMELY SUGGESTION. 

Judge Ensign suggests in The Herald 
today the formation of an historical so- 
ciety here. The suggestion seems to us 
excellent and timely and we gladly sec- 
ond it and hope that steps will be taken 
at once to carry it into effect. If the 
city of our well-founded hope, the city 
foreseen by Thaddeus Stevens a quarter 
of a century ago, rises at the head of the 
lakes, we may bj sure that every sig- 
nificant detail of its foundation and 
growth will be sought for and treasured 
up not alone by our children's children, 
but by observers everywhere to whom 
the rise of a great city is full of instruc- 
tiDu and interest. Even now it is prob- 
able that many such details well worthy 
of preservdtion have been Imt by the 
death or impaired by the indistinctness 
of memory of early settlers, and it is 
high time for the sake of the substantial 
accuracy and fullness of the record that 
measures shall be taken by competent 
and devoted effort to collect and per- 
fect it. 

Nor should the collection of material 
be limited to the date of the actual 
foundation of Duluth. The head of the 
lakes has its history, reaching back 
through the centuries to the period of 
the first French voyageurs — ofGrossellier, 
Redisson and Du Lihut, the god-father of 
our city. It will recall the missions of 
the daring and devoted Jesuit fathers, 
and tne adventurous courses of the 
pioneer explorers. Coming down to 
later times, it will perpefuate the estab- 
lishment of the trading posts and chief 
of all the notable Astor station at Fon 
du Lac. Of a certainty in the tracing 
out and determining of these events, 
there will be occupation full of interest 
and profit for the proposed society. 

The remarkable advance in the science 
of perpetuating graphic records makes 
it possible also for our society here to 
obtain and preserve records of peculiar 
and distinctive interest. The wishes of 
fancy may now be realized in sober fact. 
The invention of the graphophone makes 
it practicable to preserve not only the 
exact words but also the telling and 
touching impressions of tone and accent. 
Marvellous as it may seem, true it is, 
that hundreds of years from now, there 
will come to the ears' of inquirers the 
voices of those now hving with all the 
distinctness of life, when the speaking 
lips have been mute for centuries and 
the bodies of the speakers are insepar- 
ably mingled with the dost of earth. To 
the bistorical society of today oppor- 
tunities are open and achievements feas- 
ible which pass the boldest imagination 
of the relic-hunters of former genera- 
tions. 

Advocates have now begun to talk be- 
fore the senate committee on the World's 
fair, acd there is naturally a growing 
opinion in the senate that two years will 
not be time sufficient for bringing the 
questioc of location to a head and put- 
ting the other preparations through. 



Judg-e Ensign (during' a chat about old 
times): "For myself I don't care much about 
UQ Old Settlers association, but I should like 
to see an historical society. Such an organiza- 
tion or body does not call for any exreasive 
start la life. Sufticlent money to pay for the 
rent of and furnishing of a room, and the sal- 
ary ot a stenographer would be the principal 
ex(>ense. Then the 'old timers,' botli male and 
female, could meet and tell their stories of 
earlier experiences, all of which the sten. 
ographer could take down and when 
the funds were forthcoming the stories 
could be printed and become the legendary 
library of tht society. Kellcs and other articles 
of early time interest could be added. There 
re some men now moving among us who may 
not linger for many more years on this side of 
the vale of time. What a w. altn of story and 
recital many men carry with them, and what 
good story-tollers they are I Lot's have an 
historical society." 

4c 4c ^c 

It U the intense zeal the Roman Catholic 
feels for his religion which makes Catholicism 
such a growing power. Whoever saw a 
Protestant bishop i-ec-eivcd with such pag- 
eantry and homatre as was accorded Arch- 
bishop Ireland and liisbop McOolrick on their 
arrival last night? Why these two men wore 
received with as deep respect and veneration 
as was the Saviour when he made his triumph- 
ant entry Into Jerusalem, with the only differ- 
ence that they rode in a luxurious carriage, 
while Christ was content to make bis way on a 
meek and lowly asa. 

« * V 
"That attack in the New York Tribune on 

Col. Coiviile is an outrage, ad d outrage:" 

said a member of the old Minnesota First. 
"His ictegrity is beyond all question and if all 
the world were only half as honest and upright 
as Col. Colvllle it would be a much better 
place to live in. He is as brave, too, as he is 
honest. There was one time when I expected 
to see him shot to pieces, but he escaped at 
that time totally unhurt. It was atout like 
this: Tlie First Minnesota during an engage- 
ment, was holding a perilous iwsltioa ou the 
side of a hill upon the top of which 
the Johnny Rebs were strongly intrenched 
and were pouring down u galling Are. 
Our regiment was in a slight depression ou 
the hill side, and by dint of a lively use of 
bayonets a small trench had been dug, into 
which the men crouched. A little fellow who 
had been cramped in one position for some 
time couldn't stau<i it any longer, and rose up 
and stretched his arms and legs amid a shower 
of bullets from the watchful enemy. Col. 
Coiviile saw the man, and forgetting his own 
danger, rose up to his full length and shouted 
out: "Vou little d — n fjol, lie down; you 11 
get shot full of holes I" The man resumed his 
uueomfortuble position, but until be was fully 
covered the colonel stood watjhing him. A 
{)erfect rain storm of lead fell around him. but 
he was untouched." 

* * ^f 
Scientists all over the world are at a loss to 
know the cause or causes that conduce to the 
present irregular slate of the weather. The 
weather reports from all parts of the globe 
tell of temperatures that are entirely different 
imm what may be exuected. Naturally d'y 
climates are damp; damp countries are dry: 
warm are cold and cold are warm. New Eng- 
land has had nothing but mud since the winter 
season began. New York ha- had rain and no 
snow^. Jn Western states where little snow 
usually falls, vast storms have swept over 
them. In Duluth the temperature has been 
more varied than for many years past. lu 
Paris, Italy, Germany and Rui>sia the weather 
."ras lieen diametrically opposed to what could 
logically be predicted. Some scientists say 
the sun is the cau*e of the ill state of the 
weather. Others gravely inform the people 
that the earth is passing through great banks 
of gasses. 



James A. Boggs: That advertisement 
that I put in The Herald the other day 
brought me in a customer for the property 
on the second day after and he was a 
customer who bought, too. It seems as 
if advertising at your rates comes high 
but it pays, apparently. It is a long way 
cheaper than paying a commission or di- 
viding one. 

Capt. DeWitt of company K: The 
Minnesota National Guard association 
holds its annual meeting at St. Paul 
Jan. 21 H^d 22. All officers in the mili- 
tia are members. I want to go down 
and expect others will. Company K will 
buckle down to work now and push 
along. We hope to eclipse all old rec- 
ords. If there was an arinory|or any 
hope of one the company could do much 
better work. 

Rev. E. P. Savage, superintendent 
Childrens Aid society: I have jupt re- 
turned from Tower with the children 
The Herald spoke of Monday. Their 
names are Broderick. The father and 
mother died of typhoid within a week 
of each other and left the little ones to- 
tally alone. The people are very highly 
spoken of. There is a remarkably fine 
looking boy 2 years old, and two fine 
girls 4 and 6. I want to thank The Her- 
ald for its article; it was pleasant and 
helpful, very helpful indeed to me. 

Capt. Ray T. Lewis: Every other man 
you meet in Boston has the grip. Its 
ravages are getting to be a serious mat 
ter. Business is hindered, and stopped 
in many instances, on account of this 
disease. 

Fred P. Jones: I don't think the grip 
has reached Duluth yet. Everyone in 
Boston has it. It comes on suddenly, in 
a minute. Every bone in your body 
aches, and you have a wheezy cough. 
The weather is out of joint in the East 
as well as in the West. In New Eng- 
land and the Middle states there's noth- 
ing but a mass of mud and slush. Around 
the entire world the weather is not what 
it should be. Duluth is talked about in 
the East more than any other city. 

W. A. Pryor: Yes, abstracting is close 
to the real estate business, and judging 
from my work there must be a good deal 
of activity in real estate. We aUstractors 
are busy enough. I was interested in 
reading The Herald's article on ice last 
night. Seems to me if the ice men went 
up the river above West Duluth they'd 
get pure ice, a good deal purer than 
most cities have, I'm sure. I think 
we're a little finicky about our ice sup- 
ply. 

ABOUT PEOPLE. 



NOTHING NEW. 

[Boston filobe.] 

Wee maid Ethel, four times one. 

Listened to the time-worn story 
Of the Old Year, nearly done. 

Of the New Year's coming glory. 
And she wondered mucli and more. 

Hearing all the changes ringing. 
What new beauties la his store 

The young monarch could be bringing. 

So, when New Year's morning came. 

By tht^naiic she took her station; 
Eyes alight and cheeks atlame 

With the tire of exijeotation; 
Thus, but tor a moment's space; 

Then a eliiiid of di^ap|K>iniment 
Falling o'er the sunny face. 

That tlie world was out of joint, meant. 

Quick she turned, with pcornful eye 

.\nd with dainty nose-tip tilted— 
And at grandma sitting by, 

.'-hot a jrlunce that should have wilted; 
"Wh>. wlial is the matter dear'/" 

Fla,she<l the answer, with a pout; "It 
Is ve verw^y same olil year. 

And vero's nullin new about It !" 



TEMPLE OPERA NOTES. 



Stetson's "Uncle Toms Cabin" com- 
pany appears at the Temple tonight. 
Prices have been reduced to the popular 
purse. Tomorrow afternoon a matinee 
will be given. The company is of supe- 
rior makeup and is highly spoken of. A 
band parade was given this noon. 

What success Lillian Lewis has won 
as an actress has been gained through 
hard work and a determination to bung 
from the public a recognition of ner 
talent. Each season has given her 
warmer praise and more generous 
acknowledgment. She is the successor 
of Clara Morris, and is every whit as good 
an actress. Her mediocre success here- 
tofore has been caused by her poor sup- 
port, but this season the company is 
everything that could be desired. 




The Importance of ptrif ying the blood can- 
not be overestimated, for without pura 
blood you cannot enjoy good health. 

At this season ncarlf every one needs a 
good medicine to purify, vitalize, and enrich 
tlie blood, and Hood's Sarsaparilla is worthy 
your confldeuee. It in peculiar in that it 
strengthens and builds t;p the system, creates 
an appetite, and tones the digcstiou, while 
it eradicates disease. Give it a trial. 

Hood's S.-irsaparllla Is sold by all druggists. 
Prepared by C. L Hood & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

lOO Doses One Dollar 



Hf pif m_ mi 

The Season of Grand 
Resolves and Sol- 
emn Vows. 



All of Which is Well in Its 

Way, but Practice is 

the Thing. 



You Can All 
You Try, 

Better Try 



"Get There" 
so You ha 1 



if 



REAL ESTATE. 



The Weather Bulletin. 

Meteorological report received at 
Mlna.. 8 a. m. Jan. 10, l.SW. 



Duluth 



PLACES. iBar.lTher, 



Mr. Clark Howell, son of Captain Evan 
P. Howell, has been selected as managing 
editor of The .\tlanta Constitution to fill 
the vacancy caused by the death of Mr. 
Henry W. Grady. 

Edward Lloyd, the famous London 
tenor, starts for this country on March 
15. and will sing in the United States 
and Canada. 

It is said that some sarcastic person 
has sent to J. B. Foraker of Ohio, a copy 
of Campbell's "Pleasures of Hopes." 

The report of Tennyson's illness is 
denied. He is said to be in good health. 

Senor Sagasta of Spain, is experiencing 
great difficulty in forming a new cabi- 
net. 

Coquelin, the actor, begins his South 
American tour early in March next, 
opening at Buenos Ay res. 

Henry Irving, tired of disputes with 
his lessors, will shortly build for himself 
a theater in London, near the Strand. 

It is stated that (Jen. Byng Harman 
will succeed Prince Edward of Sa.xe- 
Weimar in command of the forces in Ire- 
land. 

Mgr. La Belle will leave Quebec this 
week for France on an important mis- 
sion from the Quebec government in the 
interests of colonization and agriculture. 

Senator Evarts has improved in health 
since his eyes were treated in Europe: 
but, says he, "the chief inconvenience is 
that my doctors tell me that I must not 
read and I must not write and I must 
give up thinking, so I will be compelled 
to turn to making speeches in the sen- 
ate.' 



Duluth I29.74; 

Pt. Arthur.. [-"gw.* 

Winnipeg . Jin SM' 
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Q'Appelic. -I* '.h; 
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St. Haul .... 
La Croftso. . . 
Bismarck. . . 
Moorfaead . 



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NE 




N 





Weather 



Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Snow 

Snow 

Cloudy 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

P't Cloudy 

Cloudless 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 



T In rain column indicates trace. One (1) 
Inch of rain or melted snow equals ten (lOi in- 
ches of snowfall. Minus (—) in temperature 
c-olumu iudicates Inflow zero. 

W. H. Fallon. 

Sergeant Signal Corps 

Duluth, Jan. 10.— Local forecast for 
twenty-four houra, ending 10 a. m. Jan. 
11: Colder weather and snow, 

Washington, Jan. 10.— Forecxutt for 
twenty-four hours, ending S a. m. to- 
morrow: For Minnesota, North and 
South Dakota— local snows, preceded 
by fair in southern portion; colder 
northerly winds Saturday. 



SPECIAL LIST 



—or— 



BARGAINS 



OFFEIIKD BV 



C. E. RICHARDSON. 



Acreage on the hill, just bacic of 
Ninth Street,. on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half interest in this forty 
acres can be had for $52,000 

80 Acres at West End, near Broolc- 
dale Division 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior I 50 

1 Acres in the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 



The lijiitt Ktul Kink. 

There was a large attendance at this 
rink last evening, consisting principally 
of ladies and gentlemen from this end of 
town, all of whom w^ere charmed with 
the skating and evolutions of Miss Mabel 
Davidson JQueen Mab), champion lady 
skater of tlie North west. 

At the request of several who were 
unable to witness her performancott in 
the past two nights, she will appear 
again on Saturday evening, when a full 
bend will be in attendance. 

The ice at this rink is in perfect con- 
dition, and everybody should take ad- 
vantage of it while in this shape. 

Skaters and others who wish to spend 
a most enjoyable evening should not fail 
to be present tomorrow night. 



The best bargain offered now Is stock In the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An Investment of a small sumwill carry 
as large a rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing In the history of Duluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 



THE NEW YEAR'S LEAF. 



IChlcajro Herald. J 
Just now is the time when the averajre man 
HoKins to proscci-tivcly mentally plan. 
As the annual swearing otT season draws near. 
Of the leaf hell turn over the first of the year, 
bverythingtliat is wrong: from his life he'll 

efface. 
And nauKht that's unjust In his thouirhtshave 

a place. 
He's sure he has power all evil to shun 
When ho says so and so then the business is 

done. 
But in order to have his new plan broken In, 
He d Ix-tter not tarry a day lo lie-in. 
And 'tis best he should not use the leaves too 

fast. 

Why not employ this year tlie leaf turned for 
last? • 



E. RICHARDSON, 

325 West Superior Street. 



WEST DULUTH! 



£ & 



SPECIAL LIST. 



$o83.3:i 

Will handle one of Thomas & Hendrick's 
5 acre lots on the hill. A rare bargain. 
L. J. Tais-siu, 

Phcenix block. 



SPATE ITEMS. 



THE POLITICAL ONLOOKER. 



A well-known ward politician was making 
bets this morning of ten to one that J. K. Shaw 
would be the next mayor. Whether he could 
(fet any takers has not yet developed. 
If * * 

The Duluth Globe, C. B. King's deirocratic 
weekly, will make its appearance Sunday 
morning. It will open the democratic munic- 
ipal campaign, and will make several candi- 
dates' announcements. It Is understood The 
Globe and Industrial Age will pull together 
in some Lines. 

* * * 

"Harry .\rmstrong is getting pretty strong 
in the Fifth ward. The labor vote will be 
almost unanimous for him, and I look for his 
election by a large majority," remarked a gen- 
tleman. 



EDITORS' GRfcAT THOUGHTS. 

Winona Republican: With a public 
school enrollment of 21,000, Minneapolis 
claims a population of 245,000. In like 
ratio, Winona, with a school enrollment 
of ±200 has a population of 25,000. But 
the approaching census will cut a hole 
in the figures of Minneapolis. In fact, 
there will be visible a very general 
shrinkage when Uncle Sams enumera- 
tors lay down their pencils next June. 

Battle Lake Review: The Browns 
Valley Tribun<* wants the chasm be- 
tween the two factions of the republican 
party in that county bridged. That is 
right; there can be but one g. o. p. in 
this country. 

Mankato Free Press: Several ex- 
changes are announcing that ex-Gov- 
ernor McGill will be in the next guber- 
natorial race for the purpose of knock- 
ing out the present executive. Their in- 
formation is defective unless McGill has 
changed his mind recently. 

Wadena Tribune: An ex-country 
elevator man— it might be well to call 
him a reformed country elevator man- 
recently suggested that the entire con- 
troversy between grain growers and 
country elevators concerning weights 
could be settled by requiring railroa-Jsto 
receipt for a given quantity of grain in 
acar as they do for all kiodsof freight, and 
then compelling them to deliver that 
quantity to the consignee. It is claimed 
that the farmer can look after the 
weights of his grain at home, but has no 
protection after it passes into the hands 
of the railroad. If a farmer ships 100 
hogs to a certain point, no railroad 
thinks of delivering but ninety, and at 
the same time satisfying the 'shipper; 
but if a carload of wheat shrinks, the 
shipper is supposed to stand it. The 
suggestion herewith noted will bear 
thinking of. 



In order to give everybody a chance 
to participate in the benefits of our great 
holiday reduction sale, I have decided 
to continue it for the balance of this 
month. Don't miss the opportunity to 
get reliable gootls at away-down prices. 
Sale closes positively Friday, Jan. 31. 
Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 

Two lots on Banks avenue West Su 
perior for sale cheap. J, A. Bogo.s. 



The total postal receipts at Mankato 
last year amounted to $14,.335. 

The Winona & St. Peter Land com- 
pany has closed its otBce at Springfield. 
During the past six months over Gc>,000 
acres have been disposed of. 

Miss Carrie Ohstran of St. Paul, ran 
away with a barber named F. C. Coul- 
ter, and was married at Hudson yester- 
day. 

The bobtail car has disappeared from 
Minneapolis streets forever. 

The Winona Harvester plant was sold 
to John Kendall for 800,100. 

The Anoka city council, after conBide'- 
able squabbling, accepted the water- 
works and electric light plant put in by 
Sykes A Co., Minneapolis. 

It is now said that ISO persons are 
suffering from trichinosis in and about 
Brownsdale, Minn. 

For December the state treasurer re- 
ceived 8241.51 from the insurance com- 
missioner as fees collected for taxes, etc., 
from insurance companies. This is the 
smallest amount for any month during 
the year. 

With reference to the proposed con- 
struction by lumbermen of a canal 
through the Mille Lac reservation, it 
appears that the canal would lower the 
water in the Mille Lac lake about four 
feet. The Mille Lacs and the white 
settlers near the lake are bitterly opposed 
to the scheme, and Secretary Noble di- 
rects that the agent give the matter his 
attention. 



J. A. Boggs offers a 
parties interested in 
Call and see him. 



good bargain to 
the West End. 



Any kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms'. 



Money In any Amounts, 

Lowest rate of interest; no delay. 

JoNE.s & Brace. 



SherifTs .Sale. 
One good work team of horses will be 
sold at Ericksijn's barn, 1925 West First 
street, at 2 p. m., Jan. 11, by. 

Paul Shakvy, SheriflF. 



Look at this list of bargains. 
80 acres in section 10-50-14. 



160 

160 

80 

40 

40 



9-50-15. 

4-50-15. 
30-50-14. 
23-50 15. 
21-50-1.5. 

Hakrls Bros. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald binderj'. 

Doe« Kxperieuce Count'.* 

It does, in every line of business, and 
especially in compounding and preparing 
medicines. This is illustrated in the 
great superiority of Hood's Sarsaparilla 
over other preparations, as shown by the 
remarkable cures it has accomplishe<l. 

The head of the firm of C. I. Hood & 
Co. is a thoroughly competent and ex 
perienced pharmacist, having devoted 
his whole life to the study and actual 
preparation of medicines. He is also a 
member of the Massachusetts and Am 
erican Pharmaceutical associations, and 
continues actively devoted to supervis- 
ing the preparation of and managing 
the business connected with Hood's 
Sarsaparilla. 

Hence the superiority and peculiar 
merit of Hood's Sarsaparilla is built 
upon the most substantial foundation. 
In its preparation there is represented 
all the knowledge which modern research 
in medical science has developed, com- 
bined with long experience, brain-work 
and experiment. It is only necessary to 
give this medicine a fair trial to realize 
its great curative value. 



We have the best 50-foot corner lot 
on Michigan street, for sale cheap; one- 
third cash, balance on five years' time. 
D. H. Stkvenson & Co., 

43 Exchange building. 

"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bi ndery. 

Poor Humanity! 

The common lot is one of sorrow say 
— at least— the pessimists, thev who 
look at the worst side. Certainly what 
would otherwise be a bright existence, 
is often overshadowed by some ailment 
that hangs it like a pall, obscuring 
perpetually the radiance that else would 
light the path. Such an ailment, and a 
very common one, is nervousness, or in 
other words, weakness of the nervous 
system, a condition only irremediable 
where inefficient or improper means are 
taken to relieve it. The concurrent ex- 
perience of nervous people who have 
Ijersistently used Hostetters Stomach 
Bitters is, that it conquers entirely su- 
persensitiveness of the nerves, as well as 
diseases— so called— which are invited 
and sustained by their chronic weak 
ness. As the nerves gain stamina from 
the great tonic the trouble disappears 
Use the bitters for malaria, rheumatism, 
billiousness and kidney troubles. 

8 lots in Harrison's, East Endion, in- 
cluding two double corners, very cheap 
and on easy terms. This must be sold 
this week. 

D. H. Stevenson & Co., 

43 Exchange building. 

Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Room D, Hunter 
block. 



Good pair on Fourth avenue, $ 1 400, 
if taken soon. 

Dwellings near Car works and Iron 
Bay works for rent cheap. 

Good house and lot in Fifthdivision, 
$ I 200. 

Two lots on Grand (paved part), 
$4000. 

Good pair on Central (paved part), 
$5500. 

Best lots in Clinton and Car. ton 
Place, $300. 

A good lot in Hunters Grassy Point 
First division, $300. 

A triple corner on Main street and 
First avenue, $2400. 

If you will sell your property at a 
reasonable figure, pleasi call, or write 
us about it immediately. 

Correspondence solicited, maps and 
any information cheerfully furnished. 
Loans and insurance carefully j.nd 
promptly attended to. 

MACFARLANE & AUSTIN, 

West Duluth. 




k 




30 FARGUSSON BL<XIK. 



80 Acres, section 9-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 33-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-50- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15. 

All below the market. 



COFFIN & WARNER. 



6PERCENTI 



C. SH[RWOOO & CO.. 

REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVK OENUINB BAKOAIK8 IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

In dlflti parts of the city and 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 

AJl we ask Is tor\., rties to examine our list and 

compare them rlth other prices before 

buylntr. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood & Co., 

J. D. 8cR. 0. RAY, 

REAL ESTATE. 

ROOM "B," - HUNTER BLOCK. 



We have at command unlimited 
amountsof money to lend prorr^ptty 
at 6 per cent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



E. C. ORIDLEY. J. C. MI8HLKH 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 

Real Estate Brokers 

Room 36, Exchange Bu!ldlnfr. 
List your pn>tK.rtj wltb us at what it Is worth 
and we will boU it. We Invite everjl)ody to 
call in and see us. and solicit ojrrospondence 



lUIONEY TO LOAN IN 
■'* sums on Ouluth 
Estate at 6 1-2, 7 and 
cent. No delay. 

JULIUS D. HOV'ARD, 
Room 3, - - Mil'er Block. 



ALL 

Real 

8 per 



Loans Made on Unimproved Property. 



BUILDING LOANS A SPECIALTY. 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY^MORTQAQES 
BOUGHT. * 

QOOO BONDS BOUGHT. 



mm i PRiLE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 

I Duluih National Bank Building. 




GREAT ENGLISH REMEDY! 

Murray's Specific. 

Tymat.KmrV A guarante«. cure for all ner 
vous disease such as Weak 
Meraorv, Loss Brain Power, 
Hysteria, Headache, Pain in the 
Back, Nervous Prostration, 
Ltsucorrhusa. Unlversiil Lassi- 
tude. Stjiiilnal Weakness, Impo- 
tency and general loss of |Hiwer 
of the Oeuerr'lve Orgiins;— In 
— either box, caused by indiscre- 
BMfVTWMCith'n or over-exertion, and which 
uiuuiaieu lead to Premature TrmdaMlarK. 
Old Adre, Insauiiy andL'onsuuip- 
tiou. ti.UU or a txix or six boxes 
for 15.00. Sent by mall on re- 
ceipt of. price. Full particalars 
In pamphlet, sent free to every 
applicant. We Ua»rHiit«e Six 
Boxen to cure any case. For 
every 16.00 order received, we 
Bend six boxes, with a wrltten^^^^^^^^ 
guarantee tt) refund the ^'^^^'yTTtZtJ^clmg 
it our Specific does not otftjct a cure Address 
.U oommu^n^catU-ns^to^h^e -jemanufagturer, 

8.1d 1. nnlath br SiSf^S^.*'*' 




Here we are the first of a new 
year as bright and happy as 
children with new toys. You 
have just closed up the record 
of the year I 889, and we sin- 
cerely hope the balance is in 
your favor— "by a large major- 
ity." If your expectations 
were not fully realized, we are 
very sorry indeed, and trust 
you will not think us too famil- 
iar if we commiserate with you. 
Well, never mind, don't feel 
badly because you failed to 
make the most of your oppor- 
tunities, for it can't be helped 
now. Recollect that there is 
no teacher in the world whose 
lessons are so impressive as 
Old Mother Experience. It is 
an easy thing to look back and 
see where you missed it, and 
then, too, in looking back at 
these bad breaks it seems so 
strange that you didn't know 
better. "Why," you say to 
yourself, "anyone who is half 
witted ought to have known 
better." That is true, but 
again we suggest that it does 
no good to harrow up your feel- 
ings in that way. The new 
year is spread out before you 
like a new blank book, all un- 
written. As the days go by 
the pages will be filled, one by 
one, and when the year is end- 
ed the volume will be closed 
and put away in your archives, 
and you will commence again. 
Since you commenced making 
up the book just closed, we put 
one of the finest pieces of 
suburban property on the mar- 
ket anywhere about Duluth; 
and simply because we offered 
lots at extremely low prices 
and on the people's easy pay- 
ment plan, a good many inno- 
cent and honest persons sup- 
posed that it was all a humbug 
and a cheat. We can't much 
blame them for jumping at the 
conclusion that it was outside 
farm land, instead of fine resi- 
dence property, because our 
prices were so low and our 
terms so favorable. But that 
is where many of you made a 
BAD mistake. Had you inves- 
tigated, you would have invest- 
ed, and so made money. But 
you can make amends for that 
this year. Now, in strict confi- 
dence (which we beg of you 
not to repeat), we will tell you 
something: Water works, sew- 
ers and electric lights will be 
put in at Lakeside, Lester Park 
and Crosley Park, a system of 
parks and boulevards laid out, 
hundreds of fine new houses 
and comfortable homes built, 
suburban train service greatly 
improved— although it is ex 
cellent now— -and the whole 
face of affairs changed. Lots 
that now sell for $125 each 
will then bring $250; lots that 
now sell for $200 will readily 
sell at $400, and so on. It is 
hard to understand how people 
who feel assured that ail this 
great growth is so near at hand 
should wait. The way to make 
money is to get ahead of the 
crowd and buy before the ma- 
jority of people do, and before 
the developments occur. Now, 
if you want to start out the new 
year right and make a record 
with which you will be satis- 
fied, take our advice and buy 
lots in Crosley Park, and buy 
NOW. If you wan't to make 
your money go as far as possi- 
ble, and thus make the utmost 
with it, buy what you can reach 
on the easy payment plan and 
keep up your weekly instal- 
ments, and you will be delight- 
ed with the results. Remem- 
ber, you will have no interest 
to pay, and that makes quite 
a difference. 

Hoping that you will do your- 
self a kindness by following 
our advice, and wishing you all 
a most happy and prosperous 
new year— and many succeed- 
ing ones— we beg leave to sub- 
scribe ourselves 



Your real(ty) friends, 

C. E. LOVm 4 CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. 




\AADe 
ONLY BY 



KKTaIRBANKACo.-^ CHICAGa 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 



DR. GKO. K. HAYCOCK, 



Manager 



Two Wights and Grand' Satui 
day Matinee. 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, 

JAN'Y I and 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD. 

ROOM 15 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



lUntu 10, 



HUGO & CO., 

- . , METIIOPOL.ITAM BLOCK. 

TELEPHONE 2*2. 



I I 



Stetson's Big Spectacular 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 



COMPANY. 



Big Double Brass Band and Orchestra! Two 
Marl<sl Two Topseysl Thrilling Ice Scene! 
Genuine Cotton Picking Scene! Grand Trans- 
formati< n at the close of the performance, 
Uncle Tom's vision of Eva in Heaven. 

Incidental to the drama the following pleas- 
ing specialties will appear: Stetson's Famous 
Lone Stj r Quartet; the Original African Man- 
aolin Students; Kersand's Jubilee Singers. 

Grand Street Parade at noon. 

Sale of seatss open Thursday morning, Jan. 8. 



I'ri< es Reduced to 75c, 50c and 35c. 



PEOPLES THEATER. 



DULUTH, 



JOHN 8. BARNES. Mgr. 



The Best Varietj Stiow in tlie Nortliwest 



WANTS, Fflfi SALE. ETC 



ONE CENT A AORD IN ADVANCE, 



Ad vcrtis-finents under this head received at 
theloliowiug piat-es, hesliles the business of- 
nce ol 1 he Ueralu : 

Kndiou J'hiirmacy, VT, Tenth avenue east. 

Itoyce & T(«tui»n, enrner Fourth avenue 
una (superior sireet west. 

J. W. >elM>n, No. iwi, corner Eighteenth 
avenue west anu ^>uperio^ street. 

I>. Juhusou, eliief clerk Phillips hotel. West 
Dululb. 



WANTED 
ladj. 



.Situationx Wanted. 

Situation clerking or writing — 
J. Li. M. 



Uelp Wanted. 

WANTED— A cook for a smaU family, 
quire, 3*) East Jjecomi street. 



In 



1 WISH to employ a few ladies on salary to 
take charge of my business at their homes. 
L,ighi, very faseinaliug and hcalthlui. Wages 
*lu i>er wee*. Itelereuce given. Good pay lor 
part time. Address wiUi tt^mp, Mrs. Marion 
\V alker, Louisville, Ky. 



w 



ANTED — Competent girl for general 
housework, 14UW Bench street. 



WANTED— Machinists. Two good lathe 
bauds at once. Inquire room 1, Odd 
ieilows building. 



Thij week, commencing JAN. 6, 

FONDAS' 





OF sues! 



ADMISSION: 



TEH CENTS ! TEN CENTS ! 



Performuucc commences at 8 p. m. sharp. 



THREE 



ACREAGE 



Y\.^ ANTED— A girl for general house work; 
TT l*mily of Uiree. CaU in foreooon. 411 
Niuili avenue east. 



<4^f1^^J^^''^'***J exiKsnses In advance. 
0\_Fv^ allowed each mouth. Steady em- 
ploy uieiit at home or traveliug. No soliciung. 
Duties delivering and makiug collections. No 
ixjstal Cards. Address with stamp. Uafer * 
Co.. Plqua. Ohio. 



WANrEI>— At the Womans Employment 
bureau, ail Superior street east, two 
seuoiid tiiris and a dozen girls tor general 
house Work. Emploiineut obtained tree of 
cost. Mi-s. A. D. Ayers. 



For Ciale. 

FOE SALE— A heavy working- team cheap 
at A. W. Eilers an Lake avenue south. 



IJ^Oli SALE— My residence with 50 or 100 feet 
X; at aio East second street. Terms to suit 
purchaser. E. A. Gilbert, <1 Board of Trade 



il^OK SALE— At a 
! house with lot i 



bargain, nine-roomod 
")X140. Price ilhsb; te*M 
cash, balauct.; ou terms to suit purcha er. For 
lurther particulars call at room 211, I'astoret- 
ttcusou builuiuK. 



Elargains 



ir^OK SALE— House and lot, *1300; iAX) down 
JJ the remainder on terms satistactorv to 
the purcuaser. This is a genuine bargain. 
Koom;ill, Pasloret-Stcusou buUdiug. 



HEAVV HUK.SES tMH SALE— 15 bead of 
heavy horses, raised at Lake Park, on 
the Northern Pucillc road, lor sale by C.W. 
uarvey. Can oe se«.;a at Uowaru barn, on the 
lake shore, Miuuesoia i>oiut. Kesideuce, SU 
West Fourth street. 



FOH HEN"r- 
steam, etc, 
Herald otlice. 



for Kent, 

Desirable room; bath, gaa, 
; nrlvate family. Address S.. 



WANTED— A furnished house for the win 
ter. L. J. Taussig. No. 9 Phoenix block 



If taken at once. 



Financial. 

DULUTH MOKTGAGK LOAN C»MP ANY 
loans money in any amount ou furni- 
ture, piauos, horses and wagons without re- 
moval from owuer's possession; also on ware- 
house receipts, bank stocks, and any pro{>erty 
ot value; notes discouute I ; partial payments 
received anu your ow n time granted tor pay- 
r>«ut; no delay; money ou hand and furnished 
iuiiuedialely after security is approved. Wm. 
iiorkau. Manager, Uoom US, Fargusson block, 
Duluth, Minn. 



IF YOU WISH TO SELL OK BU V DULUTH 
or Superior bank stock, corporation or in- 
vestment securities, call on or address B. Mur- 
phlu, broker, 9 Baunlng block, Duluth, Minn. 



Land situated near 





MISCELLANEOUS. 

^yr H. WILSON, ATTOKNEY AND COUN- 
_»_> • sellor at Law. WiU practice In State 
aud United States Courts. All business given 
prompt attention, 44 Fargusson Block. Duluth. 
Minn. 



T3LASTEK1NG. 

H. T. DINHAM. 



All kinds 
promptly attended to. 
ter block. 



ng done. Jobbing 
Olfloe. room D, Hun- 



A/TBS. J. 8. DINWOODIK. 

Teacher of Piano Forte. Voice and Sight Slng^ 
Ing. Chorus and Choir Conductor. 

Music rooms at J. J. Wigging's, lb Bast 8u 
perior street, and at residence. 131 Tenth are. B 



--THE-- 



M 



R. H. PABKEB ROBIKSON. 
VOCAL INSTRUCnON, 
8 MILES BLOCK. 



Greatest Snaps 



In the market. 



AyTcMILLEN At 8TEBB1NS. ARCHrTECTS 
JxL and superintendents. Offloe. room No. 
— . Exchange building. 



ALMKK 

."Superln 
lug. Duluth. Minn 



P ALMKK & HALL, AKCUITECTS AND 
."Superlntendents,ro<.)ra 4«. Exchange buUd- 



K. S. Halraer. lTp. Hall 



ADDRESS 



rr. 



BOX A A, DULUTH, MINN 



GBK.4T French remedy. Dr. LeOuc's pwt- 
ipniC-VL PII.L*, from Paris. France, act only on 
the generative organs In females and posi- 
tively cures suppression of menses (from what- 
ever cause), aud all periodical troubles oeou- 
liar t<i women. A safe, reUable rfsiedF war- 
ranted t<i excite menstruation or moner te- 
ll unded. Should not l>e used during pregnancy 
The large proportion of the ills toVlhlch ladlM 
are subject is the direct result of a disordered 
and lrreK;ular menstruation. Kobt. Stevenson 
& Co.. Chicago, m., H. Boswarth & a» Mil- 
waukee. Wholesale Agts. The renuine* <mly 
suppUed by Boyce &Totman, Sofe A«t«.. Di 



luth. 




$8.C0- 



_Be8t Set 
'ofTeettu 



• #f%^ 



GULLUM, 

Painlett Dentist. 



fcr«,22S.'"n;'' 1?" ^*^ Bupw lor Street. 
rarrnHon Block. Daiatk 





OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned. / 
Curled and Dyed. ; 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER,"i06 Second St. East. 



/ 



^ 



s 





f^-* 






-^ 





,/ 




-\ 



7^ 






h 



tip 



'*^ 






A 



i-' ! / 




» ■ i 





I ■BaHMMHi^HMIMM 



m 



DUIiUTH EVENING HEBAU)i JANTJAEY. 10, 1890. 



MOR[ eANKING CAPIIIiL 



The 



Two West Duluth Banks 
Will Unite With More 
Capital. 



Moving the iron 
Car Loads are 
Here. 



Bay; Seven 
Already 



Other Matters of Interest 
West Duluth and West 
End. 



in 



The Herald is allowed to announce 
today the fact that neKotiatiocs are com- 
plete for the very material 6t:eagthen- 
ing of the banking capital of West 
Duluth. The small banks that have 
been in operation there since last May 
with a capital stock of |i3,lXX) each are 
to be consolidated at once, and the com- 
bined capital made $50,000. Thus the 
bank will have much more strength than 
the two had before. Its organization 
will be changed to the national law, and 
its name will be the First National Bank 
of West Duluth. An application to the 
comptroller of the currency for necessary 
forms has already been sent forward 
signed by the following directors of the 
two banks; W. H. H. Stowell, 
Harvey P. Smith, W. E. Tanner, 
Lnther Mendenhall of the Manu- 
facturers bank, and D. II. Merritt, 
W. E. Richardson, Kobert Crombie and 
and James C. Hunter of the Bank of 
West Duluth. At the annual meeting 
of the Manufacturers bank next Tues- 
day, the atfair will probably be settled. 
It is probable that the officers will be 
those of the Manufacturers bank and 
that Harvey P. Smith, the successful 
cashier of the Manufacturers, will re- 
main as cashier of the new bank. 

Within a few days the hist vestige of 
the Iron Buy company's plant will have 
been moved from Marquette to Duluth. 
Seven carloads of tools have been re- 
ceived at the West Duluth shops this 
week and several cars are on the road. 
Four or tive cars are being shipped daily, 
and it is expected that ten days will see 
the entire plant either here or on the 
way. At least "JOO men v^iU tind imme- 
diate employment at the works, for the 
company has three large contracts 
already on its order book. These 
are for the Saginaw Mining company, 
the Brothertcn Mining company and 
the Calumet A Hecla company. The 
Iron Bay company has just completed a 
machinery order for the Calumet & 
Hecla, and the Duluth order is a dupli- 
cate. Among the pieces of machinery to 
be made is a cirimi i:i feet in diameter, 
one of the heaviest and largest complete 
castings ever made in the West. Fifty 
men are at work in the shops getting 
the machinerv' in shape as fast as it ar- 
rives, and Manager Merritt has his 
hands full in getting things in order for 
business. 

The Tribune says: '-The number of 
hands at the Car works have been in- 
creasing steadily, and about 850 are now 
receiving steady employment. The 
amount to be distributed among this 
small army of wage workers will amount 
to about iSao.tKJO." This will be a de- 
cided piece of news to anybody who 
knows anything about the Car works 
and It is almost needless to say it is 
false in every particular. 

The circulation of The Herald in West 
Duluth has kept right up to the top notch 
and it continues to have the largest cir- 
culation of any paper in West Duluth. 
The people appreciate a good th ng. es- 
pecially if it is eighteen hours ahead and 
is correct. They al-so like a Duluth paper 
to be a Duluth paper and not try to 
boom West Superior. 



See our 
column. 



list of bargains in another 
Mlfakl.\ne Jc ACSTIX. 



WEST END. 



General News of the Oa.v at the West End 
of the City. 

The winner of the S5 prize at the Par- 
lor rink last night was George Lester. 
The winner of the race at Twentieth 
avenue rink, which was also a barrel 
race, was Charles Broman. Xext Satur- 
day evening there will be a ladies' skat- 
ing race at Twentieth avenue rink. 

Ed S. Lawyer and Miss Kate Nelson 
were married last evening at the resi- 
dence of H. C. Nelson by Ivev. T. M. 
Findley. Only the immediate relatives 
were present. They will begin house- 
keeping on Sixth street near Twenty- 
second avenue. 

Henry Patrick has moved with his 
family to Moose Lake, where they will 
reside. 

Miss Edith Roesiter has returned from 
Chicago where she has been taking les- 
sons in vocal culture. 

Wm. Carey, engineer on the St. Paul 
A Duluth, has returned from St. Paul 
where he went to attend the funeral of 
his father. 

BirthM. 

McInttrb— ToMrand Mrs. Daniel Mclntyre' 

of 612 Twenty-second avenue, on Jan. 9, 1»80' 

ason. 
Leslie— To Mr. and Mre. George Leslie of loie 

West Superior street, on Jan. i), lft9U, a daui^b- 

ter. 



PROBLEM OF GOVERNMENT. 
Hon. Seth Low C'outiuuen Ulti Uiscourse 
on the Subject. 
[The Herald publL-hea below a fourth 
installment of the address of Hon. Seth 
Low of Brooklyn, to the students of 
Johns Hopkins university. In view of 
the interest awakened in Duluth over 
municipal government and the future of 
this city, the matter will be of interest. 
It will be continued from day to day 
till completed.) 

We are now ready to consider the 
main question. What does good govern- 
ment consist in, and how are we to get it 
in American cities? Any high concep- 
tion of good city government implies, 
tirtt of all, efficiency; second, honesty; 
third, economy, without parsimony; 
fourth, foresight; tifth, civic courage. 
Let us consider taese in their order. 

Efficiency has to do with the exec- 
utive. It is a noteworthy and suggest' ve 
fact that in all our largest cities the 
tendency of late years has been to make 
a strong executive. At the tirst, Ameri- 
can cities were organized by giving to 
their legislative bodies the most ample 
powers. At the same time, the executive 
of the city was made little more than a 
tdgurehead. Such appointments as it 
fell to the mayor to make, needed con- 
tlrmation at the hands of the common 
council, and, in time, the contirming 
body became everywhere, in effect, the 
nominating body. Or rather, even a 
worse result than this followed. The 
most important executive offices in the 
city were tilled, not according to the 
best judgment of the mayor, nor yet 
according to the best judgment of the 
common council, but according to the 
best compromise that could be effected 
between tnese two. Meanwhile, as one 
result of such methods, all sense of re- 
sponsibility for results was lost by both 
parties to the compromise, the mayor 
claiming that he had nominated the 
l)est olUcials whom the common council 
would confirm; and the common council 
claiming that they were in no respect at 
fault, because they could only confirm 
men who were nominated. Had the 
mayor nominated better men, they would 
claim, they would have been glad to 
contirm them. 

Thus it has happened, generally, that 
the nrovision making the executive ap- 
pointments of the mayor subject to con- 
firmation by the common council has 
resulted in a loss of efficiency and in a 
lowering of the standard of responsi- 
bility. In the largest cities of the coun- 
try, where the evils of inefficiency have 
been niost severely felt, the present ten- 
dency is to lodge with the mayor the 
absolute power of appointment of all the 
executive otlicers of the city. No high 
degree of efficient administration can be 
obtained in any other way. If this 
power, so lodged with the mayor, is 
made a part of a consistent system by 
which the responsibility goes with the 
power with equal step, the dangers to 
the city resulting from the system are 
really less than those which flow from 
the other method. Power without re- 
sponsibility is always dangerous; but 
power, with responsibility to a constitu- 
ency which can readily call it to ac- 
count, is not dangerous. It is the first 
requisite of efficient administration. 

A city is not so much a little state as 
it is a great corporation. So long as we 
can look to our state governments and 
l.he government of the United States to 
protect us in our liberties as citizens, 
we need have no fear in forming our 
city governments for the purpose of 
doing efficiently the work that a city 
government ought to dot The system 
prevailing in Brooklyn, for joining re- 
sponsibility with power, seems as nearly 
ideal as any that can be devised. The 
mayor is elected for a term of two years, 
and takes office on the first of January. 
The great administrative departments 
of the city are carried on for him, for 
one month, by the appointees of his pre- 
decessor. On the first of February it 
becomes the duty of the mayor to ap- 
point, without confirmation by the com- 
mon council, all the heads of executive 
departments. These appointments are 
made for a term of two years, so that 
each incoming mayor enjoys the oppor- 
tunity of making an administration in 
harmony with himself. Under these 
conditions, an administration is formed 
for which the mayor not only should be 
willing to be responsible, but for which 
he must be responsible. 

In practice, the people of Brooklyn 
understand that for all administrative 
failure, in any part of the city govern- 
ment, the mayor is finally responsible. 
Complaint, naturally, is made first to 
the head of the department. If the 
complaint involves the head of a de- 
partment himself, it is made to the 
mayor. If the mayor corrects the evil, 
that, of course, is the end of it. If he 
does not, he makes himself directly re- 
sponsible for it. When a new mayor is 
to be elected, the canvass is conducted 
admittedly upon the theory that the 
outgoing mayor, so far as the people are 
concerned, is responsible for all the 
acts of his administration. Naturally 
this makes a long line for the mayor to 
defend, and conspicuous failure is pretty 
certain to receive an emphatic verdict. 
There may, indeed, be poor administra- 
tion under this system, because the 
quality of administration depends on 
the executive capacity of the mayor 
himself, but there cannot be poor ad 
ministration for which nobody is re- 
sponsible. The remedy is understood, 
and can be applied at will by the people 
of the city. 

[To be continued.] 



TO A 



Cerennonies and Speeches 
the Advent of Bishop 
of Duluth. 



at 



McGolrick's Own Position as 
Was Outlined by 
Hinnself. 



it 



MOVEMENT OF CORN. 



Tery Xjtrse Daltith ward and Via the Zenith 
City Boad. 

The movement of corn to Duluth and 
to the Ecist by way of the roads running 
to the Sault and their Canadian connec- 
tions is quite large, and will be still 
greater now that tfie traffic associations 
have acceded to the equalization rates to 
Duluth and Chicago. There are now in 
elevators here about 400,000 bushels, 
nearly all of which has been received in 
the past two weeks. In addition to this 
the Manitoba has sent here about 700 
cars which has not gone into elevator8,but 
was transferred to the Zenith City line 
for direct Eastern shipment. 

The Manitoba is reaching out in excel- 
lent shape for the corn traffic, and is se- 
curing it way down in Iowa and Nebras- 
ka points. It will probably handle a 
large additional quantity before the 
movement ceases. With the opening of 
the Siwux City Jk Northern the Manitoba 
will be in much better condition to 
handle the corn traffic and bring it to 
Duluth. The Omaha line is also doing 
a great corn business, but is bringing 
none here yet. Its traffic is nearly all 
through business, it turning the 
corn over to the Soo line. All these 
shipments are based on equal rates via 
Duluth and Chicago and shows how the 
Northern route is cutting into that via 
lake Michigan and what a tremendous 
traffic this in corn will be when fairly 
started this. 



The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for y ou promptly. 

A Big Snap on Bench Street. 
4 lots on the upper side of Bench 
street, two blocks from the street cars. 
Lots 50x140 feet; JITOO each, easy terms. 
Only for this week. 

D. H. Stkvenson & Co., 

43 Exchange building. 



A Banic Kobbery ? 

It was rumored this morning that one 
of the banks in preparing for the clear- 
ing-house meeting, discovered a deficit 
in its cash of 36800. The rumor could 
not be verified. Nothing has been heard 
of the matter by clearing-house officers 
and all the banks denied knowing any- 
thing at»out the affair. 

Uat« it Flunked'.' 

The Builders and Traders exchange 
appears to have fallen into a state of in- 
nocuous desuetude. No meetings have 
been held since the organization of the 
association and there is considerable in- 
quiry as to the reason of this oppressive 
silence. That the formation of this ex- 
change would be of material benefit to 
all concerned there is no question. 



Iron Land Suit. 

Frank W. Eaton, John Frazer, N. B. 
Thayer, John Megins and Richard H. 
Fagan are plaintiffs in an action against 
H. S. Moody and Charles Howe and 
8*J0,000 damages are alleged. The plaint- 
iffs claim a three-fourths interest in the 
nw'4 of 8WI4' of 29, and ne'it of Be}^ of 
.'W, all in 63-11. The land is said to con- 
tain large quantities of iron ore. This is 
the initial suit of several that are to 
follow touching this same property. 



In order to give everybody a chance to 
participate in the benefits of our great 
holiday reduction sale, I have decided 
to continue it for the balance of this 
month. Don't miss the opportunity to 
get reliable goods at away-down prices. 
Sale closes positively Friday, Jan. 
31. Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 

J. A. Boggs offers 50 feet on corner of 
First street and Nineteenth avenue west. 
Easy terms if taken at once. 

A Corner in Kndioo. 

The cheapest comer in this division; 
gas and water; graded avenue; street 
car: Short line; great bargain. 

J0NE8 & Brace. 



Smoke the Ekidion cigar, the finest in 
the market. W. A. Footie Si Co. 



Duluth Roman Catholics are settling 
themselves today and trying to catch up 
with the business that has been gallop- 
ing along as usual while they have 
turned their attention to a reception to 
the representative of the head of their 
church. 

They made a brave attempt to do 
themselves proud last night, and they 
succeded admirably. On arrival last 
night at the depot, the bishop's party 
was 11. et by those stated in The Herald 
yesterday and escorted to the church. 
It was quickly crowded, when the cere- 
monies were carried out by the new 
bishop, assisted by Father Roy, deacon, 
Father Lawler, sub-deacon; Father Bub, 
assistant priest, and Father Corbett, 
master of ceremonies. 

Addresses of welcome were made by 
Father Roy on the part of the clergy; R. 
\. Coslello on the part of the congrega- 
tion; Theodore Helinsky on the part of 
the Polish Catholic citizens; Dr. Landry 
on the part of the French church and 
Henry Gruesen on the part of the Ger- 
man Catholics. They were answered by 
the bishop who spoke feelingly and 
heartily. He said his heart grew warm 
at the reception. When he saw the 
multitude composed of all classes he 
knew he would be well able to do the 
work prepared as bishop of Duluth. 
"Next after Almighty God," said he, "I 
love the diocese and my heart and soul 
is in the work before me. I hope from 
this very evening to commence the work 
of progress here. So that it may be said 
that with the growth of the city, which 
in the past has been astounding, the 
Catholic church has grown accordingly." 
After this the guests went to The 
Spalding and before the banquet an in- 
formal reception was held and the 
bishop was presented to a large number. 
At 11 o'clock Toastmaster Graves in a 
few remarks introduced Mayor Sutphin 
who excused himself and C. O. Baldwin 
answered for him. Mr. Baldwin made a 
brief and pleasant welcoming 
speech. "From the bottom of 
our hearts," he said, "we welcome 
the guest of the evening. May he have 
long life with us. May peace follow in 
his footsteps and success attend him." 

Bishop McGolrick introduced, arose 
and said: "It's with difficulty that I 
leave behind men with whom I passed 
nearly a quarter of a century. I came 
among them unknown. For twenty-five 
years I was trying with them to build up 
temporally and spiritually my chosen 
dwelling place. Vet on leaving them I 
am consoled, for I grasp the hand of 
fellowship and receive the hearty wel- 
come of new-found friends. For 
the tears of parting, I have 
the smiles of welcome. I give my 
self, heart and hand, to the future build- 
ing up of Duluth. I am not like the 
Pharisee of old, stumbling on the streets 
of their cities because they were so given 
to meditation. People today do not 
look on that grand old man of Rome 
ruling over so many i)eople as the 
drjigon with seven heads and ten horns 
of the apocalypse. I am not among 
those who would class the acts of the 
Jesuits of old as to be admired. A priest 
should be a man, to take interest in 
everything transpiring in the community 
in which he lives. Far be it from me to 
say that it is a sin to taste the wine of 
the active pursuits of life. I am doubt- 
ful about the facts of astronomy. When 
a boy I was told it was 90,000,000 miles 
to the sun, today I am told it is less. 
Our absolute knowledge is but small. 
There are many things upon which men 
can unite. 

"Charity is a common ground of 
brotherhfxxi. I tind much in common 
in the field of duty of the doctor and 
that of the priest; the one attends our 
bodily comforts, the other our spiritual. 
All of those questions which agitate 
men seem of little moment in compari- 
son with that of getting closer to the 
heart. I stand before the toiler and tell 
him he has rights and duties. I tell the 
capitalist he has rights and duties. I 
trust Gkxi that you will find that after 
the years have passed, and I have la- 
bored with and among you, Duluth, 
joining tiands with her sister city across 
the bay, will rival that city on Lake 
Michigan. I shall give you the best I 
have, and I trust that after we have 
worked together we shall be found to 
have done our duty. I have been wel- 
comed tonight in such a hearty manner 
as to draw tears from my eyes, and I 
shall never forget it. I will enter with 
you into your work. I will not forget 
this, ray first night in Duluth." 

Secretary Phelps was the next talker. 
He resppnded as well as usual to a toast. 
"We need such men as this new bishop," 
he said, "in Duluth and in our Chamber 
of Commerce. We are anxious about 
enterprises that lead to commercial 
greatness. W^e should not forget things 
of a different nature, but far more im- 
portant." Judge O. P. Stearns and Sen- 
ator A. J. Whiteman, who had been 
asked to speak were both unavoidably 
absent. 

J. R. Corrigan of Minneapolis spoke 
briefly in behalf of the Minneapolis dele- 
gation. Judge Spencer, late of North 
Dakota, and G. W. White of St. Paul 
made brief speeches. At midnight the 
banqueters rose and the reception was 
concluded. 



A WORTHY OBJECT. 



Duluth 



CompoHltorH Subscribe Liberally 
to Found a Home. 

Whatever may be said against com- 
posing printers as a class — and they are 
the recipients of much undeserved un- 
kindly criticism — there is no discount on 
their liberality. This is sufficiently 
attested by their contributions to a 
most v/orthy object. It is true it is an 
object which enlists their warmest sym- 
pathies, and may account somewhat for 
their prodigal liberality, though the 
compositor is ever ready to extend a 
helping hand to the needy. 

The desirability of a home for indigent 
members of the typographical unions 
which also might serve as a retrept for 
comsumptive and health-broken prin- 
ters, has long been discussed by the 
international body. It has now been 
made practicable by the donation of 
ei^rhty acres of choice land adjacent to 
Colorado Springs. The climate is 
mild, the air clear and bracing, the 
water pure and the sanitary features un- 
excelled. The land is worth 8-kK) an 
acre and all the donors ask is that a 
building to cost not less than $20,000 be 
erected. 

The appeal for funds to put up the 
building is meeting with a 
ready response from all over 
the country, and the Duluth 
union has already contributed the 
greater portion of their quota and will 
undoubtedly do their ehare. to the end 
that the institution be properly sup- 
ported in the future. The object is to 
make the home a model; a quantity of 
land adjacent is highly productive, thus 
affording the inmates the opportunity of 
employing themselves at outdoor labor 
if they desired. 

The Duluth union has taken great in- 
terest in the undertaking, and if its ex- 
ample in the matter of contributions is 
followed by the other unions in propor- 
tion a sum more than sufficient for the 
building contemplated will soon be avail- 
able. The object is a most worthy one 
and cannot fail to commend itself most 
highly to all interested. 



SPORTS AND SPORTSMEN. 

A Pacing Mstoli; Gen«-r»l NoteM of Ball 
uud Other .Sportx. 

San Francisco, Jan. 10.— W. E. Davis 
of Chicago has deposited §500 with The 
Breeder and Sportsman of this city as a 
forfeit for a match between his pacer, 
Rov Wilkes, and Orrin Hickok's Adonia, 
for 32500 a side, the winner to take the 
gate receipts also. The match must 
come off before Feb. 15, as after that 
date Wilkes goes into the stud. Davis 
is willing to have the match c<ime off on 
any track within 100 miles of this city. 

A WreHtler Uylne. 

Chicago, Jan. 10. — Information reaches 
here from the East to the effect that 
Matsada Sorakichi, the well-known 
Japanese wrestler, usually designated as 
the "Jap," is in the last stage of pul- 
monary consumption. He is confined to 
his bed and helpless, and it is doubtful 
whether he will ever be able to leave his 
room in the brief lease of life that re- 
mains to him. 

Sporting: Notes. 

Vermont has a penalty of $500 for bet- 
ting on a horse race. 

A glOOO town cannot support a S10,000 
club. That is why the baseball grave- 
yard is so full of small-fry tombstones. 

In the skating match at Amsterdam 
yesterday Norseng, the Norwegian, won 
the 5-mile race in 17m. 48 2-5s. 

Washington and Indianapolis will not 
be in the league next season. They 
never have "been in it," but they'll be 
less in it next season than ever. 

The Occidental club of 'Frisco paid 
out §.39:38 for fights last year. 

During the past year the three ath- 
letic clubs of 'Frisco have paid §34,413.05 
to pugilists. 

Members of the Golden Gate Athletic 
club in San Francisco paid out 811,500 
for glove contests last year. 

The Niagara Fails club has invited 
the Leatrue of American Wheelmen to 
hold its annual race meet at the Falls. 

Pitcher Swartzel of the Kansas City 
club, was married at Cincinnati, Dec. 31, 
to Miss Mabel Ware, a young school 
teacher of Dublin, Ind. 

Rev. Wilton Merle Smith, the famous 
pitcher of the Princeton club in '77, has 
become pastor of the Central Presbyte- 
rian church of New York. 

Eddie Conley, a brother of Jimmy 
Conley, the clever Cambridge boxer, 
starts this week for Buffalo, N. Y., to be 
in readiness for his finish fight with 
Jack Leary of that city the 19th inst. 



Borrow on Short Time. 

We can make you some small loans on 
short time at best rates. 

J0.VE.S & Brace. 



CITY BRIEFS. 



At the meeting of Clan Stewart last 
night there were thirteen initiations. 
Chief Simon Clark's resignation was not 
accepted. Committees will make ar- 
rangements for the celebration of Burn's 
anniversary, to take place on the 24th 
inst. 

This morning the case of J. M. Nelson, 
charged with supplying whisky to 
Indians, was heard before Judge Carey. 
This is a continued case. 

The weather prospects are slightly en- 
couraging for the ice men. The barom- 
eter is ascending in the Northwest and 
another cold wave may be looked for. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 



12 m., 



pany's office. Hotel St. Louis: 
19 below ; 3 p. m., 22 ; 6 p. m., 22 above ; 
10 p. m., 24' above; 7 a. m., 24' above; 
9 a. m., 25 above; 12 m., 26 above. 
Maximum, 26" above. Minimum, 19 
alxj ve. Daily range, 7 . 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
board of health will be held tomorrow 
afternoon. 

A valuable horse belonging to Thomas 
Calvary of 616 East First street, died 
this morning. 

Horace vVilliams and John Davison 
were two drunks at the police court this 
morning, and each got the customary 
dose, seven days. 

Miss Nellie Orton has just opened an 
office in the St. Louis building She is 
an expert stenographer. 



B 



R 



O 



T 



H 



E 



R 



S 



RO 



W 



N 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restaurants, 



—AND- 



TAKE NOTICE! 

We art) agents for the celebrated 

Green Point China 



The Best in the World. 



Get our prices and vou wUl be per- 
fectly Butistled. 



19 West Supenor Street. 



G. 



GROUND FLOOR 

327 West Superior street. 



SUPERIOR 



LIST. 

6, East Twenty- 



Northeast quarter of block 
third street. 
Lots 23 and 24, block 8, Merriam Park. 
34 1 West Sixth street. 
I 90 and 3 I West Ninth street. 
638 and 640 West Eighth street. 



The above for sale on one-third to 
one-half cash paynnents. 



NO ALUM — NO AMMONIA — NO LIME- 
NO PHOSPHATES, IN 

.^^IC^. 

C R E A M 

Baking Powder 

MOST PERFECT MADE. 

Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for more than a quarter of a 
century. It is used by the United States Government. Endorsed by the heads of the 
Oceat Universities as the Strongest, Purest and Most Healthful. Sold only in Cans. 



WANTED ! 



Purchasers for 



PRICE BAKING POWDER CO. 



YORK. 



CHICAGO. 



ST. LOUIS. 



SAN F&ANCISCO. 



Boii II lie 11 



FOR SALE: 



50-14--ln Icreage, - 
4S-15--ln Icreaie, 
Superior Street 
Dock Propertj, - 



-11 



)UUU| 



1,SOO,000 
- I.OOMOO 



Lots for Sale as low 
as $25 each. 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. 



FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table is supplied, and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



Probate Notice. 



State of Minnisota, i -q 
County of St. Louis, f *°- 

In Probate Court, Special Term, December 
26th. 1889. 

In the matter of the estate of Charlemagne 
Tower, deceased. 

Letters testamentary on the estate of said 
deceasoU l>ciiig- this day granted unto Charle- 
magne Tower, Junior, Kichard Heiiry Lee and 
Jul.us A. Bailey of Philadelphia, in the state 
of Pennsylvania, 

It is onlc-red that all claims and demands of 
all persons against said estate lie presented to 
this ourt for oxauiination anil allowance at 
the probutoolHce, in the ct>urt house In Du- 
luth, in said county, on Monday, the thirtieth 
daj' of June, IrtXi, at tea o'clock a. m. 

It is further ordered that six months from 
the date hereof be allowed to cretlitora to pre- 
sent their claims ajr.iinst siild estate, at the ex- 
piration of which time all claims not presented 
to said court, or not proven to its satisfaction, 
shall be forever barrcnl, unless for cause shown 
further time be allowed. 

Ordered further that notice of the time and 
phuje of the hearing and examination of said 
claims and demands, shall be irivcn by pub- 
lishing this order on Friday in eaoli week 
for tiiree successive weeks, in The Duluth 
Evening Herald, a dally newspaper printed 
and published at Duluth in said county. 

Dated at Duluth, the 3«th day of December, 
A. D. IN<".t. 

By 'he Court, PniNKAS Aver, 

ISeai.l Judge of Probate. 

Walter Avur, 

Attorney for Executors. 

Dec. a;, Jan. 3-10. 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY, 



MINNESOTA. 



First class In every way. Newly refitted. 
Finest sample room In town. Livery In 
eonnectlon. WILI lAM GRANT, Prop. 

Open November I . 



DtE.C. Wests 



NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT 

Spocifl(? for HT?ti li.T, I)izzino-«,Klts, Ncuniljria, Walcc 
rulnesa, Hentul Dtpros.sion. Hol'teuinfy of the Brain, re 
Miltliip in inMiMiiy ;inJ Icadinir to misery ilcs'av and 
tlerith. Pr«'mftturo Old Ajfc, ItaiTenncs.'*. Loss of Power 
int'iliior sex. Involtmtary l.oi".e.-. uinl Spennaton-hoca 
.aiised liy ovcr-»"xertion of Ihe brain, telf-abusc or 
over-Indulgence. Kaoh txjx contain^ one month's treat- 
ment. SI a box. or six for $.i. fcnt hv mail prepiiil. 
" ith each onier for fix hox**s. wiJI t^erui punliascr 
i.'uarantee to refund money If the treatment I aila tu 
eurv, Uuaranteca issued and gcumoii atolil uniy by 

Boyce & Totman, Phoenix Drug Store, and 
7 West Superior street, sole agents, Duluth, 
Minn. 



NEW HOTEL. 

THE 

MraPOLITAII 



8t, Paul, Minn., 

Cor. 4tli and liratshinerton St«. 

On Cable Car Lino. Be.^t Tabic in the No«iu 
west. Haies 13.00 and I pwards. 

W. U. Bahnes. Manager. 



Mortgages negotiated. 

6 AND 7 HER CENT. 



Lowest rat«e for all sizes and grades of 
security. Before borrowing elsewhere In- 
quire of 

N. J. UPHAM, 

Under First Nat, Bank. 
NATIONAL BANK BUIl.OINQ. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



4 



■^ 



M i t^ ii XI.. mt-j 



^^TTi^^mt ■ i^yii 



NOTICE. 



The regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of the First National Bank of Tower 
will be held at its office In Tower, Minnesota, 
on Tuesday, January 14tli. ISSW, between the 
hours of 10 o'clock a. m. and 4 o'clock p. m., 
for the election of directors and for such other 
business as may come before the meeting. 
G. W. Hkrtqes, 

Tower, Minn., Cashier. 

December 13th, 1889. 



HARWOOD'S 

Cit) Transportation Freight and Express, 

DRAYS. 

Office, 17 First Avenue West 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFICE 

17 First Avenue West. 



FOR SALE 



Forty Acres 



Ttee Valuable and Nice-Lying Lots 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



:- WILL BE SOLD VEBY CHEAP -:- 



-ALSO- 



Ikee Good Boilding Lots on Nintli Street, 



■' 



Near Third avenue east 



All these are well located and very accessible. 
Good schools and graded streets close by. 



ADJOINING 




-AT A- 



Apply by letter or in person to 



"ED," 



C^f^IBE lEHZEZEe-^X^ID. 



; 

■ 
r 

■ W 

■ 

>• 

* 




R. KROJANKER. 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 



Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
kinds of furs a specialty. Jd^" Good workm 1 1- 
ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 



i 



209 East Superior Street. 



Duluth, Minn. 



Bargain 



Inquire of 



LS.. 



Postoffice Box A A. 



O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT. 

Boims 510, ill and \\l Dulutli Onion National Bank Biiilding. 



- 



m BOLTON HOT MM OUTER 



Has the best record for the longest time 
in the coldest climate. See one set up 
in our store. 

P. V. DWYER & BROS., 

Telephone 170. | 207 W. SUPERIOR STREET. 



if 



MEMBERS OF THE 



DULUTH CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION. 




American Exchange Bank 
Bell & Cyster's Bank 
First Nstional Bank 
Security Bank of Duluth 
State Bank of Duluth 
National Bank of Connmerce 
Marine Bank 



CAPITAL. SURPLUS 

$300,000 $200,000 

100,000 10.000 
1 ,000,000 

100,000 

100,000 

1 00,000 

250,000 



1 00,000 
26,000 



mt 'mmramm^m 



- ■*- 




■J' 



DLTLiUrn li^V^EI^IXG HEBATlD: JAISTTARY 10, 1890. 



Of 



E. 



The Markets Are All Dull 
Grain and Stocks 
Today. 



for 



Gossip of the Boards; Daily 

Movement; Prices on 

Stock. 



Little was done in the wheat market 
today until the last half hour, when a 
good buvinjj order or two pushed up 
prices and made a close very strong; 
stronger than other markets. With an 
advanL-e of ^ for May over last night all 
the wheat wanted could not be had— a 
fact that would seem to indicate that the 
owners of the wheat here want to hold 

on to it. 

In ciish wheat there was nothing save 
in regular. Tiiere was a demand 
fresh receipts 
cash. No. 1 



and on cash 
hard closed at ' 



for 
stocks and 
9 for regu- 



lar and 7y '4 was bid for fresh receipts. 
S'o. 1 northern regular closed_at 76. ^ No. 
1 northern on track sold at "9. No. 2 
northern closed at 72 for regular and 
loKy bid for on track. January wheat 
ckised at 79, nom. May wheat w.-is 
dull until the last hour or so, when it 
sold at 84 '4 and quickly advanced .to 
84 >2, which was bid at the close. No. 1 
northern Mav closed at 81 1. 2 bid. 



The I>i»llv Moveuient. 

Carson track: Wheat, 2S; corn, 11; 
Receipts: Wheat, l>4ti7 bu;corn, 9384 
bu. Shipments: Wheat 13,071 bu. In- 
spection: Wneat, No. 1 hard, 4; No. 1 
northern, 14; No. 2 northern, 1; totals 
19; corn, 11; oats, 10. Minneapolis, cars: 
Wheat, 204; corn, 133. Receipts there 
were: Wheat,121,380 bu. Shipments: 
Flour, 22,822 bbls; wheat, 22,500 bu. 
Chicago, cars: Wheat, 74; corn, 231; oats. 
129; rye, IS; barley. 2S. Wheat on track 
St the three places. :kK3. 

The Fluur Trade. 

The Northwestern Miller of today 
says: .\s was expected, the output of 
the mills made a heavy gain over Christ- 
mas week. The aggregate production of 
the dfteen mills which ran was 135,780 
bbls against H.^,S;}0 bbls the week before 
and 78,88(.» for the time in 1889. Today 
there are fourteen mills in operation, 
producing close to 23,000 bbls daily. 
Some changes are to be made in the list, 
but two mills which will start will about 
offset one that will stop. The plan for 
keeping up a head of water, by the steam 
mills using their engines as a motive 
power alone, is working satisfactorily, 
and what water mills are kept in motion 
are enabled to produce their full quota. 
The latter class today number four, and 
are getting out 4500 bbls. The flour 
market continues lifeless, and as most 
everybody is grinding more flour than 
current sales amount to, there is much 
less urgency to run than formerly. Sev- 
eral of the mills not possessing steam 
plants expect to stand idle for a con 
siderabie time after March 1, while the 
elevated tracks are being rebuilt. Local 
millers generally report sales light the 
past week. One large concern claims to 
have had a very good trade, selling to a 
single party 140 cars of patent for ex- 
port. Export trade is much worse than 
domestic, bids by cable today being low. 
Manufacturers argue that there is no 
margin in flour, and are maintaining 
prices pretty well. The direct exports 
for the week were G3,810 barrels, against 
38.880 the preceding week, and a large 
per cent was of patents. 



BACK BONE DID IT. 

A Little Display of .Sand Forces the 
Aiuerican Aitsociation to DlHgorge. 

The committee appointed to investi- 
gate the American Building and Loan 
association of Minneapolis, returned last 
night. 

Governor Merriam was duly waited 
upon by them, and a meeting arranged, 
but before they could get together the 
governor was seized with a violent at- 
tack of the grip, from which malady he 
is still suffering severely. Consequently 
the meeting did not take place. 

The committee next visited the offi- 
cers of the company and made a very 
plain statement of the case, and the 
course of action that the Duluth stock- 
holders propose to take. This had 
the effect of bringing the company 
to their senses, and if promises 
count for anything, there is a fair pros- 
pect of most of the money being re- 
turned. At least 90 per cent of the 
amount paid will be given 

back to the Duluth stockholders, pro- 
vide<i the laws of the 

state will allow ttie company to do so. 
The officers of the company are well 
satistied that the Duluth people have 
plenty of backiwne; they also express 
themselves to the effect that these par- 
ticular Duluthians are kickers of the 
most disagreeable kiad. 

The committee was a thoroughly re- 
presentative one, and its members are 
deserving of considerable credit for their 
effective management of the case. A 
meeting with the governor has been 
arranged for next Tuesday, when the 
committee will go down again, and no 
doubt return with the funds belonging 
to the defrauded stockholders. 

Further information as to the neces- 
sary steps to 1)6 taken for the complete 
recovery of the money and other data 
can be had by appyling to Mr. Louis 
Rietz, at his place of business on East 
Superior street. Mr. Rietz is consider- 
ably interested in the affair and being 
thoroughly posted in all details pertain- 
.ng to the matter is in a position to af- 
ford informatioa. 



The 



TODA Y'S RA TES, 
a $10 



Into 



Chicago Gossip. 

The following dispatches are over the 
private wires of W. W. Bill, su cceseorto 
Pressy, Wheeler & Lewis: 

Wheat opened higher with a marked 
increase in the bullish feeling, conse- 
quent on news of large clearances of 
flour from the various Atlantic ports. 
It seemed probable that a fair advance 
could be scored, but it was prevented by 
sales of May at 82 and over by Hutchi- 
son and Partridge, which proved too 
much for the wants of the scalping buy- 
ers. Per contra, when the market broke 
to tbe "put" price, 81 'g to .*4, it was the 
purchases by Hutchison which stopped 
the decline. In brief, it has been a 
"Hutchison" rrarket. Trading has been 
active, with rather better than an aver- 
age amount of outside business. 

Corn - Firmer on warm weather and 
light receipts, bnt not active. 

Provisions- Act ive and strong. There 
were several large orders for May pork 
executed said to have come from New 
Yotk. 

New Vork .stoclts. 

The following are closing prices on the 
New York stock exchange as reported bv 
W. W. Bill & Co.: 

Yester- 
day. 
IffT 
31 
7H;>, 
'*h 

61'. 

ws 

llH'.t 

9T:i 
lUa 

37 "^ 

21'. 

32\ 
1.3:-', 

67 
1U3?, 



Today. 
Chicago, Burlln)rton& Quincy. K/r^, 



Atneri.-aii i>itti)n Oil. 

SIi-»<.uri Pat-iai: 

NorthtTQ H;icitlc preferred 

Chicajfo, .Milwaultee & Si. Paul. 

SuKur Trust 

G;is rru«t 

Loui-viile Jc .Na.*hville 

ChieaKo & .N'orth western 

Hocli Island 

iMke Sliore , , , „ 

Readiiijf gg-. 



73 Ji 
'*% 

52s 

4eH 

11U% 

«7'-i 
106 



Richrijurid Terminal 

Ateiiisou 

DeiawiiTe ii Lackawanna. 

L-ad Trust 

Western nion 

Union PaLlttc 

OU 



2IH 
.. «■/, 
..137S 

.. ajs 

.. «6'i 
..106"» 



Zenith City puts a $Hi Kate 
Effect; Michigan Connections. 

It is reported among railroad men in 
Duluth today that a certain Chicago 
road is pro rating with the Burlington & 
Northern road. Should this prove true 
it will bring the 810 rate of the Soo line 
into use. The association meeting at 
Chicago yesterday to decide the pro rata 
question came to naught. There is evi- 
dently more of a mind to bring the war 
east of Chicago than\here has ever been 
before. Some time ago the Trunk lines 
agreed to ignore cut rates of Northeast- 
ern roads, but there is a marked ten- 
dency to ignore this agreement. 

The new Zenith city line 
rates arrived this morning at 
the Duluth office. The following are the 
prices in effect today: To Boston, Bel- 
lows Falls, Wells River and Portland, 
31t) first class, and 614.40 second; New 
Vork, S21.50 and 819.90; Montreal, 815 
and 813; Augusta, 818 and 816.40; Que- 
bec, 818 and 814.50; Rome, 819.30 and 
817.30; Utica, 819.02 and 817.02; Worces- 
ter, 816.85 and 815.25. 

A meeting was held yesterday by 
general agents of St. Paul, Minneapolis 
and Duluth roads, looking to a basis of 
rates from these cities to Detroit and 
Michigan points. No agreement was 
reached and the meeting adjourned. 
The South Shore S: Atlantic occupies a 
dictating position to these points, and 
can make and has heretofore made the 
rate to these places. 

Micliigao Koads. 
Representatives of the Michigan roads 
and the Chicago, St. Paul and Duluth 
lines had a conference yesterday to con- 
sider and agree upon the rates that shall 
obtain on both east and west-bound 
business between St. Paul, Minneapolis 
and Duluth on the one hand and Bay 
City, Detroit and Port Huron on the 
other. The matter was fully discussed, 
but no definite agreement could be 
reached as to the rates to be established. 
The outcome was the adoption of a res- 
olution authorizing the initial lines to 
make the rates on this business. A 
special meeting of the Michigan Passen- 
ger association is held today. 

REA L EST ATE. 

A Record of the Keal Kstate Transfers for 
24 Hours, Ending at Noon. 

.M»ry A Kyder to S F Wiiite, lands In 27, 
2S, 3:M!>-l.i... $ 

Charles d'Autn^mont to Steve Stephen- 
son, an undivided 4 of the sVi of the 
SWI4 and si^j of se^-^ of 32, the SH of 
nc'4 of se^i of nw'4 of 33, and the bwM 
of nwi, or .M-63- 3 

J I) Kiiy to Maria Lucie, lot 5, bloclc 73, 
Portland 

J H Trljrsfs to H H Hawkins lot IW, 
blo<-k '>, Duluth proper. Second divi- 
sion 

Jerry Commo to James L Cromwell, lot 
10, block 47. West Duluth, First divi- 
sion 

Selwofxl Land company to John jiicob- 
son. lot 17 and I», block 16, plat of Sell- 
wood 

G G Hartley to J E Young, the neii of 
ne}» of neSi of 35-oi)-15 l.OOO 



STRADDLE THE BAY. 

Many Courtesies Keceived by Superlorites 
from Dulath Hibernians. 

The Commercial hotel was a scene 
of revelry, feasting and rejoicing last 
night. The Ancient Order of Hiberni- 
ans of the city invited the Superior 
branch of the order to "oe their guests 
on the occasion of the Roman Catnolic 
Bishop's coming, and the Superiorites 
responded to a man. After the services 
were over the Hibernians formed in line 
and marched a solid and hungry column 
to the Commercial where the Duluths 
had prepared a spread for the occasion. 

The address of welcome was made by 
Secretary J. C. Hessian of the Duluth 
organization. It was most feli^jitously 
expressed, and as happily res^Kinded to 
by President Dwyer of the Superior del- 
egation. Over 200 guests were at 
the supper tables, which were twice 
filled. On their return to the train the 
guests were escorted by the Duluth 
members, and all expressed themselves 
more than pleased with Duluth 's boun- 
tiful hospitality. 



THIS YE ARS PAVING- 

Michig:an and Bench streets to t>e Changed 
and Paved. 

The city engineer is busy preparing 
estimates for paving Michigan street 
from Second avenue east to Ninth ave- 
nue west, and Bench street from Eighth 
to Twenty-first avenue east. 

The paving will be cedar blocks laid 
upon a Telford foundation. This is a 
little different from anything ever done 
in Duluth before, but makes almost as 
substantial a foundation as concrete and 
is much less costly. The curb will be of 
granite. The cost will probably be 82iX) 
per lot. There will be on Bench street 
a change of grade from Eighth to Thir- 
teenth avenues east, making a level 
roadway. This will necessitate a fill of 
from one to five feet between Eighth 
and Tenth avenues and the street will 
be cut to the present established grade 
between Tenth and Thirteenth avenues. 
There will be a cut of from two to three 
feet on Michigan street between Lake 
and Second avenues west, which will 
vastly improve the street. 

The large stone culvert now being 
built underneath Bench street is pro 
gressing rapidly. It is a most substan- 
tial piece of work. The paving will 
probably be one of the first pieces of 
public work commenced in the spring. 
It is the intention to push the work to 
completion as rapidly as possible as soon 
as the ice and snow disappears. 




Absolutely Pure. 



This powder never vanes A marvel of pur- 
ity, streng-th and wholesomeness. More eoo- 
□oinical than the ordinary kinds, and 
cannot be sold in competition with the multi- 
tude of low test, abort weight, alum or phos- 
phut" powders. Sold odIv lu cans. Hoy at 
B*K iNG PoWDKR Co., 106 Wall street. N. Y. 



PIONEffl FOEL CO., 



WKATHER FORKCAST. 

Jan. 10. — Forecant for Duluth and 
incinity for :i4 hour.-i cummfncinQ 10 a.m. 
today: iSnow; colder weather. 

Obskkvek, Signal Office. 




CROSS CRFEK [[HIGH. 

FR[[ RuemiiG. 

|!.!IIiR)ICIl[ i BliyMIHOUS. 



A SPORTING EVENT. 



tlie I'eoples 



match 
Cristol 
at the 



The Wrestling: Match at 

Theater Tonislit. 

The long-talked of wrestling 
between Professor Lucien Marc 
and Geo. W. Curtis comes off 
Peoples theater tonight. The match is 
for 8200 a side and the money is now all 
up in the hands of the stakeholder, John 
S. Barnes. 

This match has caused a good deal of 
excitement among tbe sporting class, as 
the men are about the same weight and 
bitter rivals. The management of the 
Peoples theater has decided not to raise 
the price of admission on this occasion. 
The admission will be the same as usual, 
ten cents. The regular variety show will 
take place first, then follows the wrest- 
ling match. There will be no draw in 
this match, it will be wrestled to a finish 
if it takes all night, so says the manage- 
ment of the Peoples. 



5 = 






WOOD 



Dry .Maple, 
Hard Mixed, 

.SiHltS, 

Kd things. 




COHIIFLLSVILLE 
And GAS HOUSE 




) 



FREE. 



FREE. 




FREE. 



I 00 Suits Underwear were given away Free to the first I 00 people 
in our store Monday arter our doors opened. We oflFer all our Under- 
wear at cost to close it out. 



-:- TUESDAY -:- 

I 00 Caps were given away, and aM our Caps are to be sold at first 

cost. Sealskin, Otter, Persian Lamb and Plush. All must m regard- 
less of cost. 



wm peoMPTLy dflivebed 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



Office: Hotel St. Loais, 326 W. Suparior St. 



YARD: 
Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Qarfield Avenur 
Rices Point. 



Mortgage Sale. 



There will be 
Twentieth avenue 



a ladies' race at the 
skating rink, Satur- 



day evening. First prize 825 dressing- 
case, second prize $.") dressing-case. 

For quick sales list your property 
with Merritt & Leddell, room 4, Fargus- 
son building. 



Mortgage Sale. 



I.T0O 
1 

4,OUO 

700 

375 



7 transfers; total consideration. 



»7.-7« 



IS in- 



DISTRI CT C OURT. 

Derelict Grand Jurors; More Indictments; 
General t'roceedinss in Both Courts. 
Before last night's adjournment An- 
thony Gisch was arraigned on a charge 
of grand larceny. in the sec- 
ond decree. He appeared with H. S. 
Lord as attorney, and was given one day 
in which to pleac' and was required to 
furnish .33i.)0 bail. This was done. Case 
96 was placed on the list of court cases, 
the jury Ijeing waived. In case 67 the 
jury returned a verdict for plaintiff for 
$848.87. On motion of plaintiff's attor- 
ney a sixty-day stay was ordered. The 
plaintiffs claim the verdict 
sufficient. 

This morning the jury in the case of 
Gardner Ciish, et. al. vs. Herman Bing, 
et. al. brought in a verdict against the' 
defendants for *4G4.52. Case 101, City 
va Swain k Todd was on trial all the 
morning. In the case of the State vs. 
Charles Crump indicted for assault, an 
order was made giving the defendant 
until Monday to plead. 

The grand jury came into court and 
reported that ihey did not have a quorum 
present and the court ordered writs of 
attachment for contempt against ab- 
sentees—A. D. Grant, Edward McMinn, 
William Ahearn. The sheriff brought 
Ahearn and Grant into court 



Have More Customs Ufllcials. 

The Northern Pacific railway has been 
notified that to do a bonded business 
between Eastern Canada and British 
Columbia it will have to obtain Cana- 
dian customs ofllcials and station them 
at all transfer points points west of Du- 
luth. The railway has frequently to 
break the seals of cars containing bonded 
goods, and unless this is done in the 
presence of a Canadian official the goods 
will not be permitted to enter Canada. 

.\ Carloa^l of Boilers. 

The National Iron works have just sold 
a carload of boilers, one of them for the 
Troy laundry and two of them for pump- 
ing engines for Capt. McDougall's 
"whalebacks," Xos. lOi and 105. 



The public funeral of Mrs. W. G. 
•Toerns was held at the residence. No. 
712 East Fourth street, this morning. 
A large number of friends assembled to 
pay their last respects. In the after- 
noon the private ceremony was held and 
a large concourse followed the body to 
its 'inal resting place. 

Kemoving au ObHtruction. 

In accordance with instructions by 
the city council, a squad of police was 
detailed this afternoon to cut down the 
posts and remove the wire fence round 
lots 28 and 29, Portland division. These 
lots were those claimed by A. M. Kilgore 
and by N. F. Hugo, about which there 
has already been some litigation. The 
lots in question encroach very consider- 
ably on Third avenue east. There are 
several claimants to the property, but 
the city has used the avenue for over 
twenty years without dispute of right 
which under the laws gives perpetual 
title. 



DEFAT7LT HAVING BEEX M.VDE IX THE 
payment of the sum uf tiirt-c liundred 
dfteeu 50-iUO dollars (WiSoO), principal and 
Interest, wiiich is claimed to be due at tbe diito 
of tills notice upon a certain morttpiife. duly 
executed and delivered by Francis X. Parent 
and Mary E. Parent, his wife, to Henry F. 
Davis, bearing date the seventh day of .liiue, 
A. D. l!vsy, and duly recorded in the office of 
the ret?ister of ileeiis in and tor the county of 
St. Louis, and state of Minnesota, on the 
eighth day of June A. D. iShSt, at « o'clock and 
10 minutes, A. M., in ilixilc^i of Morlg.ges, ou 
page »i7, and no action or proceeuing at law 
orotlierwise having Ijoen instituted to recover 
the debt secured by said Mortgage, or any part 
thei-eof ; 

Now therefore, notice is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale contained in said 
mortgage, and pursuant to the statute in such 
case made and provided, the said Mortgage 
will be foreclosed, and the premises described 
in and covered by said mortgage, viz: 

Lots three ,3) and four (4i, lif section eighteen 
(18), and lot (3). of section nineteen ili»), all 
in township sixty-three («3i, north of range 
twelve (r.J), west of the -itb principal merliliaii 
in St. Louis county, and state of Minne- 
sota, with the hereditaments and ap|)ur- 
tenauces, will be sold at public auction. 
to the highest bidder for ca-h, to pay said 
debt and interest, and the taxes, if an v. 
on said premises, and twentv-tive dollai-s 
attorney's fee, as stipulated in and by 
said mortgage in ease of fort^closuro, and the 
liisburscmeuts allowed by law; which "ale will 
lie made by the sheriff f said St. Louis 
TOunty, at the f rf>nt door of the Court House, 
in the city of Duluth in said county arid state, 
on tlie UWh day of January. A. D. iKm, at lo 
o'clocli a. m. of that day, subject to redetn))- 
tion at any time within one yeiir from tlio day 
of sale, as provided bv law 
Dated December 13th, A. D. 188». 

Henuv F D.wis, 

Mortgagee. 
R. N. Makblr, 

Attorney. 
Dec. U-21-28. Jan 4-II-l!<-i->. 



Default having been made in the payment 
ofthesumof three Ituudied and sixty tA\-\<M 
dollars, (*;iOO uO-lOOi principal and interest which 
is ciaime<i to be due at tbe date of this notice 
ui)on a certain mortgage duly executed and 
d> liven d by Franls Doyle, a bacheIor,toJam s 
B. Howard and Alexander H. Davis, bearing 
date the tenth day of Niiveraber, A. D 1»<N<, 
and duly rec<irde<i in tlie office of tbe register 
of deeds iu and for the county of Saint Louis 
and state of Minnesota, on the 12ih day of 
Noveinlier A. D. lts^8, at 9 o'clock a. m., in 
b<x»k "20" of mortgages, on page 'USt; and no 
action or proccH.'diug at law or otherwise hav- 
ing been instituted to recover the debt se- 
cured by saiil inortguge, or any part thereof: 

Now, therefore, notice is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a ixjwer of sale coutaiued In said 
ni"rtK:it.'e. and pursuant to the statute in such 
case made and pruvideil, the said mortgage 
will lie foreclosed, and the premises described 
in and covered liy said mortgage, viz: Lots 
numliered six (ti», seven (7) and eight (Mi and 
tbe northeast quarter (iie'x> of the southeast 
quar'er (se'41 of section numl)ervd tw^enly-two 
(S.'), all ill township No si.vty-one (til» north of 
range No. twelve (12) west ot the fourth (4th) 
principal meridiun, in St. Louis county, and 
stale of Miiinesuta, with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances, will lie sold at public auction, 
to tlic highest liidder for cash, to pay said debt 
and interest, and the taxes (if any)on said prem- 
ises, nnd twenty-ttve dollars, attorney's fees, 
as stipulated in and liy said inorttrHge in case 
of foreclosui-e, and the disbursements allowed 
by law ; which sale will be uiatle by tlie sheritf 
of sad St. Louis county, at the front door of 
the court house, in the city of Duluth, in said 
county and stato, on the 2!nh day 
of January, A. D. ISO, at 10:.3<l o'clock a m. on 
that day. sulijcct to redemiition at any time 
wit hi n one > ear from the day of sale, ftg pro- 
vided tiy law. 

Dated Decemlior i:Jili, A. D. IHSg. 

J.\ml:s B. Howard, 

and 
Alexander H. Davis, 
R. N. MAKBt.E, Mortgagees. 

Attorney. 

Dec. 14-21-28. Jan. 4-11-18-25. 



-■■-WEDNESDAY -:- 

We gave away FREE I 00 pairs MHtens to the first I 00 
our store and all our Gloves and Mittens will be sold at 10 
below actual cost. 



people in 
per cent 



OUR GREAT SACRIFICE SALE 

RPn??oP """^ ^'^*r" days-until stock is reduced. Cost or worth cuts no figure. WE MUST 
REDUOE,even atagreat loss. Our low pnces have caused us to meet with unqualified suc- 
cess in this, THE GREATEST SALE OF OUR BUSINESS EXISTENCE. Space wm not allow 

V^^T^^^^'lo^r.o^^^^^ ^^^''"^' ^°^' ^^^'^ "^* ^^°P ^^ read^hem. but we will 

$7.49 Buys an Elegant Fur-Trimnned Overcoat Worth at Least $ I 5 
$9.47 Buys an Otter Fur-Trimmed Overcoat Worth at Least $18. 

The same reductions on all our overcoats, Suits, Eloys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear 
Furnishing Goods No reserve. We must reduce our stock at least $35,000 (Thirty-five 
Thousand Dollars). Mild weather leaves us overstocked and compels us ti take the loss 
Uall and see our prices. 

THE im mm clothing com 

M. S. BURROV/S & CO. 






THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON, Proprietor. 



Strictly First-Class in all tppointments. 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



For Sale 



FORTY \m 



UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



Northern Patclflc Short Line. 



DITliirrH TO BUPERIOR. 



Leave 
Duluth 



Leave 
W. Sup'r 



Notice to Contiactofs. 



NOIICETO STEAM FimRS 



Sealed proposaU will bo received until 2 
o'clock p. in , January 3 ith. l.'^»). by E. R. JetTer- 
son, chairman ot comtniiteeoa court hous'o 
and county jail, for tbe steam-heutliig' appara- 
tus in the new county jail, in aeeordauee wit'i 
plans and specitlcatloiis drawu by t> G. Tru- 
phajfcn, architect, on flle at the office of the 
county auditor. 

Each proposal must be accompanied with a 
certltled cheek for two hundre<l (ioMars, to be 
forfeited to St. Louis County in the eu-nt that 
the proposal which said check aeeom aides 
shall be accepted l)y tlie county commissioners, 
and that the per.-<on making the proposal shall 
fail to comply with its terms. 

Address all proi>osals to E. R. JetTerson, in 
careof county auditor, Duluth, Minn. 

For further information apply to .John F. 
Schlenuep, 8uj)eriiiteudeiit. Duluth. .Minn. 

The commissioners reserve the riKht to reject 
any and all proposals. 

Dec li-lJ^-Zl-iM-SMan 1-4-8-11-15-18-22. 

CHICHESTER'S ENGLISH 

PENNYROYAL PILLS 

"^ RED cnoSS DIAMOND BRAND. 

Hftfr an*! alwaT> r'^li»hlu. |.|ftdlel^ 
».«>( I>ruB::isl for ' IHan:ti\d Brand, in 
r«4l, m: tjilliiT iM>x*-ii, ^.-alcl with blu* j 
ribbon. Take no other. Ai: pill* 
in pa«t^bo»ra txUM. pink wrappera. are 
'■•■BProaii rountrrfelta. .Hrnil 4«. 
<tt»ini..) f,.r (ariicui»r». tefltimoaiall ud 
"Keller for Ladle*," <n letter, bjr retara 
■all. .Vrtm« flayer. 
ttlckMtOT l'k*a-| Co., BiMiQa g^ PU]a„|k 



Pealed proposals will bo received until 2 
o'clock p. m., January .'*lth, im\, by E. K. Jef- 
ferson, chairman of coiniiiittee on court house 
and county Jail, for the cell work in the new 
county jail, iu accorilanco with plans. sf>ecltl- 
catlons drawn by () (J. Traphagen, architect, 
on tile at the office of the cHjunty auditor. 

Bidders will siK'cify what quality and 
strentrth of clirume steel they propose to use, 
and submit sample of same. They will also 
submit drawitiKS or samples of locks and bars 
they propose to use, and all mechanical de- 
vices connecte<l with the cells. 

Each proposal must 1)0 aceotnpanied with a 
check for tlve huixIrtHl dollars to be forfeited 
to St I.,ouis county, in the event that the pn> 
posal which said check hccompanles sh)>ll be 
accei-ted by the county commi.-^sloners, aod 
that the iierson making the proposal shall fail 
to comply with its terms 

Address alt pro|H)sals to E. K. Jefferson, In 
care of county auditor, Duluth, MIna. For 
further information app'y to 

John F. ScHi.Et'XE.s, 
Superintendent, Duluih. Minn. 
Tbe wimmlssloners reserve the riKht to re- 
ject any and all pro|H>sal8. 
Dec H-Ks-21.24-3sJan 1-4-8-11-1.5-18-23, 



A. FITGER & GO'S 

Lake Superior Brewery 

V J 

It the larKestIn the State of MId lesota ou aide 
of the Twir CItlei , 



Mortgage Sale. 



-IN THE- 



EAST END 



Blxccpt Sundaj-. . 
E.xccpt Sunday. . 
Except Sunday. . 

Daily 

Dally 

Except junday.. 

Daily 

Daily 

Dally 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday.. 

Dally 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday.. 



6:)Uamj 6 45 am 

7 35 ami 7 ^ am 

8 55am{ OK) am 
lUUUam! 10 15 am 
11 85 am 11 50 am 



110 pm 

2 15 pm 

3 2.) pm 

3 3Upm 

4 00 pm 

4 35 pm 

5 40 pm 

6 45 pm 
715 pm 
9 26 pm 

11 10 pm 



12tjpm 

2 30 pm 

3 40 pm 

3 45 pm 

4 15 pm 
4 50 pm 

6 55 pm 

7 00 pm 
7 30 pro 
9 45 pm 

U27pm 



Arrive 
Superior 



6 5:2 am 
8u2 am 
9 17 am 



'ALWAYS ON TIME." 



10 : 



am 



II 67 am 

1 35 pm 

2 37 pm 

3 47 pm 

4 25 pm 

4 57 pm 

6 02 pm 

7 07 pm 



115 3 pm 



SUPERIOR TO DULUTH. 



j Leave ' Leave ; 
iSuperiorW. Sup'ri 




SEE THAT YOUR TICKETS 



-Tt>- 



In order to give everybody a chance 
to participate in the benefits of our 
great hohday reduction sale, I have 
decided to continue it for the balance of 
this month. Don't miss the opportunity 
to get reliable goods at away-down 
prices. Sale closes positively Friday, 
Jan. 31. Andrew .Jacksftn. jeweler. 



All 
stock; 



Vegetableit. Vegetables. 

kind of vegetables carried in 
potatoes, parsnips, rutabagas, 
and onions by Clark & 



beets, carrots 
Metz 



Commercial bindintr and 
oeives accurate and prompt 
The Herald Job Kooms. 



printing re- 
attention at 



I have a great demand for property 
List your property with me for quick 
sales. J. A. BoGos, 

35 Fargusson building. 

A big snap in West Duluth. We have 
four lots on First avenue west and Main 
street. Price 83U00; easy terms. 
D. H. Stevenson & Co., 

43 E.xchange building. 

A double corner on East Second 
street, in Endion, only 32600; one-third 
cash, balance one and two years. 
D. H. Steven.son & Co., 

43 Exchange building, j 



DAVID M. FORD, 

Houghton, L. S., Mich. 



DEALER IN 



Lake Superior Cold, Iron and Copper Ms 

Michigan Qold Company's Stock a Specialty. 

"The richest mines In the world." 

CORKE8PONDKMCE .SOLICITKU. 

WHITE BEAVER'S 

HEALS DISEASED LUNGS. DRUGGISTS SELL : 

T, H. SPEHCE, LA CROSSE, WIS. 



Fargo, Grand Forks, Fergus Falls, Helena 

Butte, Portland, Tacoma, Seattle, 

Victoria, San FranciscoJ 



miD ALL POINTS IN THE NORTiWEST 



VIA THE 



Northern Pacific 



No other line in the Pacitic Northwest 
is equipped with, 

COLONIST SLEEPERS 

It is the only rail line to Spokane Falls, 
Tacoma and Seattle. 



WHEREAS, DEFAULT HAS BEEN MADE 
In the cnilitions of a eertaiii mortg-ajire, 
executed and delivered by .Mary ^herwin and 
Elijah (). Sherwlu, her husband, mort^afcors, 
to Alonzo J. Whiteman, mortgagee, dated the 
eleventh day of October A. D., 18»7, 
and duly recorded in the office of 
the rejfister ot deeds of the county of 
Saint \jo\i\s and state of Minnesota 
on the twenty-el jfhth day of November A. D., 
IW, at nine o'clock a. m.. In book 23 of 
mortjraKes, on page 13, such default consist- 
ins of the non-payment of tlie principal and 
Interest moneys secured by said morlg-asre, on 
which said mort}?aKe there is claimed to be due 
at the date of this notice the amount of 
live thousand six hundred and- thiny-flve and 
55-1(10 i$ri.iU,').5.")Ulollars, principal and interest, 
and no action or proceeding has been insti- 
tuted at law or Iu equity to recover the debt 
secured by said mortgage, or any part thereof; 
and 

Whereas, said mortgaffe was duly 
asslfrned by the said Alonzo J Whiteman, 
mortgasree, to Augusta Lettau, by assignment 
datea the second day of November A. D., 18f?7, 
and recorded In the oSice of the register of 
deeds of the county of St. Louis in the state of 
Minnesota, on the t went} -eighth day of Novem- 
ber A. D.. 1^87, at 9 o'clock a. m.. In book P of 
mortgages, on page 377. 

Now, notice Is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale contained In said 
mortgage, and of the statute In such 
c...-<e made and provided, said mortgage 
will l)e fortsclosed by sale of the mortg ged 
premises therein described, at public auction, 
at the front door of the court house. In the city 
of Duluth, In the county of St. Louis and state 
of Miunesota, on Monday the twenty-seventh 
day of .January A. D., Wdi, at ten o'clock In 
the forenoon, to satisfy the amount 
which shall then bedueou said mortjpige, with 
the interest thereon, and costs and expenses 
of sale, and seventy-Hve dollars attorney's 
fees, as stipulated in said mortgage In case of 
foreclosure. 

The premises described In said morgage. and 
so to be sold, are the lots, pieces or parcels of 
land, situate In the county of St. U)ui8 and 
Stat* of Minnesota, and known ahd described 
as follows, to-wit: 

Lots numl>er thirteen (13) and fourteen (U) In 
block number nine (9), Portland division of Du- 
luth, according Ui the reijorded ijlat thereof on 
flle In the ofBce of the register of deeds in and 
for the county of St. Louis. 
Dated December 3rd, is 9. 

AUOUSTA LETTAtT, 

Assignee of Alon/.o J. Whiteman, 
Mortgagee. 
Wai.tkr Aveus, 
Attorney of Augusta Lettau, 
Assignee. 
Deo. 12, le, -M, Jan. 2. 9, 10. 23 



AT A- 



Daily 

Except Siunday... 

Daily 

Except Sunday.. . 
Rxccpt Sunday... 

Daily 

Daily 

iJailv 

Except Sunday... 

Daily 

Daily 

Dally 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 



646am 

7 03 am' 7 U7 am 
j 740am 

8 10 am 8 17 am 

9 25 ami 9 32 am 

10 46 am 10 66 am 

11 05 am I U 16 am 

12 35 pm' 12 42 pm 
145pmi I 52 pm 



2 50 pm 

4 05 pm 

5 05 pm 

'e'id pm 

7 20 pm 
11 45 pm 



3 00 pm 

4 15 pm 
512 pm 
6 10 pm 

6 17 pm 

7 30 pm 
1162 pm 



Arrive 
Duluth 

7 05 am 
7 23 am 

7 65 am 

8 35 am 

9 48 am 
11 10 am 

11 30 am 
100 pm 

2 07 pm 

3 15 pm 

4 30 pm 

5 30 pm 

6 25 pm 

6 35 pm 

7 45 pu. 

12 10 am 



Bargain. 



S ^ Paul & Duluth Short JLine. 
Duluth 1 o West 

SuperlDr *6m +800 846 n030 'UOOam 

Duluth to West 

Superl>r *2 40 446 teaO "eeO'+lOOOpm 

West S jperlor 

to Duluth t^lO *~,f6 9 30ni0 15 *1116am 

West Siperlor 

to Dul tth •2 00 +240 3 50 •e 45 "te 10 •g 10 pm 

•Dally. +We8t Duluth only. 

Leave Juluth daily for Spirit Lake— 9:00 am, 
J^ 30 p m; returning at 10:05 am and llpm. 



There Is no line so handsomely equipped for 
Through Passenger Service as "The Nortnwest- 
ren Line"— C, St. P,, M. & O. Ry— and the 
Minneapolis, St. Paul and Chicago trains over 
this line have a better record for reaching 
either end of their run "on time" than those of 
any other line In the country. 



THE 



Well posted travelers between the Twin 
Cities and Chicago take this line— partlcularlw 
favoring the "Vestibule Limited," which carries 
the tmest sleeping cars and coaches ever built 
and also all classes of passengers, without 
extra fares. On the Lake Superior portion of 
the line, between Minneapolis, St. Paul and Du- 
luth, and St. Paul and Ashland. Pullman 
sleepers are run on night trains, »nd parlor 
cars on day trains. 



NORTHWESTERN 



Pullman sleepers are also run through between 
Duluth, Superior and Chicago. Fast through 
trains are also run between Minneapolis, St. 
Paul and Kansas City, via Sioux City, with 
through Pullman sleepers St. Paul to Omaha 
and Kansas City. Dining cars are run on all 
tiirough trains over this line between Minneap- 
olis. SI. Paul and Chicago, and between St. 
Paul and Kansas City. Besides being the bMt 



LINE 



Chicago* 
d of the 



& Omaha, 



SL Paul & Duluth Railroad. 



Terms - Veif - Adyanlageous. 



l eavo Di luth... 
Arrive St Paul.. 
Ar Mlnni^aiKilis. 

At Still w Iter 

Ar Mlhvaakee... 

Ar Chicaifo 

ArSt. Loais 

A r Kansa s City . . 



o.a Q,c 
It a (s n 
<<'0 — B 

: BoM 



8 00 am 
2 30 pm 

2 55 pm 

3 30 pm 

4 15 am 
7 CO am 
6 05 pm 
4 46 pm 



I 
of 

B a. 



210 pm 
6-56 pm 
7 20 pm 
7 05 pm 
6 46 am 
9 30 am 
5 05 pm 
4 46 pm 



2! 
: E? 



lOOOpm 

6 65 am 

7 15 am 
700am 

+7 06 pm 

t+T 00 pm 

+9 3Uam 

8 45 am 



between these principal cities, the 
Northwestern system of lines composed of 
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapo- •'^^"^ "^ 
k M *i° f; Northwestern and frt...„,... ,..„„„m 
& Mo Valley Ry's (all advertised as the "North- 
western Line,") traverse a rich and populous 

?i".u''T[' "l** °*^""* '^'^ "««» ""sa"* of Veichlne 
all the territtory intersected. Before selecting 
« route, travelers should get a folder, with a 
map of this line, and they will quickly sM the 
advantages offered. All particulars, with ma.->s 
and time tables, may be obtained of 

GEO. M SMITH 

^oVwr'STu)^^^ Hotel St. Louis BIdg. Duluth. 
T. W. TEA8DALE. 

Oen'l Passanger Agant. St. Paul 



-+Kxcept Sunday— to other points dally. 



r orthern Pacific Itailrosd. 



Dlntn? Cars on Pacific 
EJipruss Trains. 



! Leave Arrive 
Duluth Duluth 
I Dally, i Dally 



For lull Informatioa, rates, etc. 
address 



call on or 



J. 0. ROBINSON, 



Ticket Agent Union Depot, N. 
W. KOEHNOW, 
Pass. Agsnt, Duluth, Minn. 



P. R. R. 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 

— ANll— 

INSURANCE. 



Rooms I, 

DULUTH, 



2, Exchange BIdg. 

MINN. 



tS^Acreage near the city 
limits at below market prices. 



ADDRESS 



S -^, Gr 



Care of Herald, Duluth. 



Pacific Ecprcss (limited) for 
Fargo, Helena, Butte. Ta- 
coma, Ssaitle and Portland, 
Grand Kjrks, Grafton, Win 
nlpeg 

Dakota Eipress, for Fergus 
Falls, VVahpeton, "argo, 
Jamesto »-n and intermediate 
polnt« 

Chicago E (press, for Ashlandl 
Milwaukee, Chicago and lOl 
Wisconsin Central and Mil- 
waukee, Lake Shore St Wost- 
ernpointa. 



3.30 pm 



7,15 pm 



6.26 pid 



NOTES 



from the diary of tourists, com- 
mercial travelers, business 
men and others has revealed: 



That the Wisconsin Cextral 
qualified endorsement of all: 



have the ua 



4.00 pm 



7.55 am 



ICaOais 



Ajll traias dally. Through sleeper fronr 
Duluth on Dakota express leaving at 7:15 p 
m. Free < 'oloulst Sleeiiers are run on Paclfli 
Express leivlng Duluth at 3:30 p. m. 

JNO. C. KOHINSOX, 
Ticket Agent, Union Depot. 



Dnluth, .South Shore and Atlantic. 

Leaves Du uth daily 930 per 

Arrives Ucpulilic, Mich 8 37jam 

Arrives Ishpeniing. Mich 7 25 an? 

Arrives Ncgaunee, Mich 7 35am 

Arrives M injuette, M'-h 8 06 am 

Arrives Sa lit Ste. Marit. Mich 135 pm 

Anives Ot :awa, Ont.- U 45 am 

Arrives Mt nt real. Que 330 pm 

Arrives Ho iton, Ma^s 830aiD 

Al rives N« w Vork, N.Y 70Uam 

Arrives Detroit, Mich... lllOam 



That the Wisconsin Central baa to-day the 
most popijlar lino between Mikneapous. 
ST. Paul, DuLtTTH. Ashland and MilwahI 
KKE. and Ch icaoo : 



That the Wisconsin Ckntbal is dallr addln* 
toits admirers as the recognized Pui^lmai? 
Une l>etween Minnakpolis, St. Pauu Dc 

LCTH. ASHLAJJD, aud MiLWACKJSE aC^CHI- 

That the Wisconsin Ckntkal touches the 

I^mT.iP':"'?'^'*"*' P°'°** »«> Wisconsin: mS 
and that it has* moi-e imjwrtant busin m6 cen- 
ters on its through line than any oU^raiU 
way iniheKoKTUWKST; "^ "iner rau- 



That the Wisconsin Cjbntral has made enn- 

That the Wisconsin Crntral runs fast trains 
on which all classes of passengers arecaS^ 
with^v^mmodlous and .fUtoctSS,'^:^^^ 

That tbe* Wisconsin Central has reDreonntj.. 
t'ves distributed throughSut^e^JS^ 
who will cheerfully give anv inftlmon^' 
that may be deslr^ ind tha'^^ it°'"t^uSS 
ih?"^'* r'*.*P^'*">' instructed to lJ^?Sf?S 
^ vU uI^lILe' P'^'^« ^^^ "nay be ro^! 

?«TTif«il'li "»'0"n'it'on. »PPly tovour near 
eei^licaei Akont or to representaifvoe of th 

8, R AiNSLnt. H. C. Barlow 

General Manager. GenL Traffic Manum- 




( 






r 



1 



A 




f 



t— • 



/. 









- 


|_- 




^ 


1 '' '■■i 




















; 


1 


I 




1 


iJ 


; i 




-iU 




mniii. ij.ist«>tc»i ^^v- — rf 



F 



ACRES 

Near Short Line Park on railroad. 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 West Superior Street. 



DULUTH EVENING HERALd. 





FOK 


BARGAINS 

— BEE— 


E. 


C. HOLLIDAY, 




326 W. 


Superior Street. 




HOTEL ST 


. LOUIS BUILDING. 



VOL. 7; :N0. 239. 



DULUTH, MINN., SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 1890— EIGHT PAGES. 



PRICE THREE CENTS. 



.^ 



51 



( 



Do You Want to Borfow Money? LAST ED 







We can let you have it and without delay. 

MONEY ON HAND 

Provided you have sufficient security. 



TO BUCK STANDARD OIL. 



Ouf Rates ate the Lowest Obtai 




n- 



Applications for loans wanted at once in 

DULUTH, WEST DULUTtI OR WEST SUPEBIOH 



Improved or Unimproved Property taken. 





.A . 




1 




1 

1 

« 


/ 


•;. 


/ 


i 



One Place 
Capital is 
the 



Where English 
Welcomed by 
People. 



To 



Buy Many Oil Wells and 
Enter Into Competition 
Direct. 



If 



So, it Will be a Splendid 
Chance to See Fur 
Fly. 




URGE - Oe - SMIILL - 



We have on hand $800, $ I 600 or $2400 

for a 

SNAP IN REAL ESTATE 



All cash. 



fiealc state, Actes and Business Pfopeity a Specially. 

Call and see what we have. 



FIRE 



INSURANCE. 




The best Foreign and American Companies rep- 
resented. Policies correctly written. 



Stryker, Manley & Buck. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 








GLASS BLOCK STORE. 



s 




L 













* 




•i 

( 

• 






4 



S' 



Commences a great Reduction Sale 
in order to reduce our very large 
stock previous to taking inventory. 

See circular giving list of a few of 
the many bargains offered at this 
Great Reduction Sale. Many goods 
at LESS THAN HALF the former 
Low Prices. You can save money by 
taking advantage of this sale 

AT THE — 



New York, Jan. 11. — A combination 
is being made between some of the prin- 
cipal oil producers of Pennsylvania and 
the owners of foreign capital, for the pur- 
pose of constructing new pipe lines be- 
tween the oil fields and the coast. 

The movement is the most important 
which has been attempted in the oil in- 
dustry since the Standard Oil company 
secured its monopoly of pipe line trans- 
portation. It contemplates the pur- 
chase outright of wells valued at $10,000,- 
000, the construction of competing pipe 
lines and the combination of many of 
the principal producers who do not sell 
their wells. 

The American representative of the 
foreign capitalists who are interested in 
the scheme, is the same gentleman who 
has placed many millions of foreign capi- 
tal in this country. He said when asked 
about the matter yesterday: 

"Yes, negotiations have been for some 
time in progress and are now well ad- 
vanced for the purchase of Pennsylvania 
oil wells, and the building- of new pipe 
lines. It is intended to do the same 
class of business as the Standard Oil 
company, but in combination with the 
production of oil. In t e present situa- 
tion about all the profit goes not to pro- 
ducers but to the transporting agent, 
which nominally is all Standard Oil 
company claims to be." 

"Do you propose entrance into active 
competition with the Standard Oil com- 
pany?" 

"Not unless it is necessary. We are 
not going into the enterprise to make 
war. We propose simply to bring the 
product of certain wells to the seaport 
market. If the Standard Oil people 
start a war of rates, we naturally would 
try to keep our end up and protect our 
interests." 

Mr. J. D. Rockefeller, president of the 
Standard Oil trust, said tO'lay that he 
knew nothing of such a scneme. 



HONOR JUDGE KELLY. 

Tbe Houxe Soleiuiiizt- k the Funeral of the 
Late Judge Kelly. 

Washington, Jan. 11. — Long before 
the hour of noon the galleries of the 
house were filled with spectators, there 
to do honor to the memory of a man who 
had for so many years been a prominent 
member of that body. A few moments 
before the house was called to order 
members of the senate, without formal 
announcement, entered tbe chamber and 
quickly took seats. 

A sable-covered bier stood in front of 
the clerk's desk and a handsome floral 
tribute was placed near by. At 12:10 
tbe officiating clergymen, Drs. Butler 
and Cuthbert, entered the hall reading 
the beginning of the burial services. 
They were followed by the committees 
of senate and house having charge of 
the ceremonies, and then amid a solemn 
hush, the magnificent casket containing 
the remains of William D. Kelly was 
placed on the bier. 

The family of the deceased were then 
escorted to seats provided for them. 
The burial service was read by Dr. But- 
ler and prayer was offered by Dr. Cuth- 
bert. 

FATAL RE SULT OF A FIGHT 

Gasting: Kills Kuryartand Then Blows His 
Head Off. 

WiNiMAC, Ind., Jan. 11. — Ferdinand 
Gasting, living in S'arke county, and 
Charles Kuryart of Cass township, Pu- 
laska county, Indiana, two farmers, had 
been quarreling about the boundary 
line which divides their lands. Thurs- 
day Gasting commenced tbe work of 
setting up fence posts on which he 
claimed to be the line. Kuryart or- 
dered him to move the posts back. A 
tight ensued and Gasting fired into the 
breast of Kuryart, killing him instantly. 
Gasting then turned and fired into the 
door and seriously wounded a child of 
Kuryart. Gasting then placed the gun 
against his right temple, pulled the trig- 
ger, and shot off one side of his bead, 
killing himself instantly. 

Kaidlni; the Saloons. 
Bangor, Me., Jan. 11. — The temper- 
ance movement assumed a new phase 
here today, raids being made upon the 
saloons by officers who served warrants 
sworn out by the temperance people. 
The dealers anticipated the move, and 
closed and locked the saloons, but the 
offii'ers effected an entrance in some cases 
by breaking in the doora. A large 
amount of liquor was seized, and intense 
excitement prevailed, the officers being 
followed from one place to another by 
great crowds of men. It is said that the 
work will be resumed tomorrow. 

Ret. Sims Vindicated. 
55M0NTICEL.LO, 111., Jan. 11. — The Rev. 
a.B. Sims, the evangelist of the Christ- 
ian church, has been vindicated from 
the charges iigainst him of immoral con- 
duct. The church at Antioch, *here he 
has been preaching, gives him a certifi- 
cate of good character signed by the 
elders and deacons of the church and the 
church clerk. The Rev. Sims is now at 
Monticello holding a series of meetings 
in the German Lutheran church. 



Glass Block Store 



rf 



m 



& WATSON 



It Must Show Uown. 

London, Jan. 12.— In the libel suit 
brought by Mr. Parnell against The 
Times, the court has refused The Times' 
appeal against answering the question 
regarding the circulation of The Times 
at the time of the publication of the 
articles on "Parnellism and Crime." The 
court, however, has allowed an appeal of 
The Times against disclosing the names 
of parties from whom it received infor- 
mation on which the articles were 

based. 

Tired of the Strugsle to Lire. 

Bloomington, Ind., Jan. 11. — The 
body of Miss Rebecca Fuller, the young 
lady who left home here last Monday 
night, was found in the river here today. 
In a letter written by her she says she 
was tired of the struggle to live. 



COL. ROGERS PROPHECY. 



Grain Option Business to Make Mlnne. 
apolis Its Headquarters. 

M1NNBI.VP0LIS, Minn., Jan. 11. — Few 
men in the grain business watch the 
course of events so closely as Col. G. D. 
Rogers. For this reason a remark the 
Col. let fall possesses a peculiar interest. 
And this was what he said: 

"It won't be a great while before the 
grain option business will follow the 
actual grain business, and make Minn 
apolis its permanent headquarters." 
For year's Chicago has been the great 
stamping ground of the wheat 
speculators. The price of 

speculative wheat has long 
been made in Chicago in spite of the 
fact that other Markets are by long odds 
greater. But at last that fact is begin- 
ning to work the sure result of trans 
ferring the option trading. 

"Why," said Col. Rogers, "the big Chi- 
cago operators are beginning to trade in 
our pit, and that's a pretty good indica- 
tion of what's in the wind. Hutchinson 
himself sends many orders, and some of 
them big ones, to his brokers here. I've 
Sien a well-known young broker here 
buy 1,000,000 bushels which I was cer- 
tain were for Hutch. It's less than a 
year that the wheat pit was re-estab- 
lished on 'change and it has been a 
growing success." 

Col. Rogers elaborated somewhat on 
the subject and said that Hutchinson of 
Chicago had predicted that Minneapolis 
was the coming option market and that 
he had become a frequent buyer here. 
He said option trading was an undoubted 
help to tbe dealer who has the actual 
grain to sell, or to the miller wh^ wants 
the actual grain to buy. And with this 
Col. Rogers closed comment on his 
prophecy. 

MONTANA SENATORSHIP. 

Republicans Have a Sclteme to Coiue Out 
Aliead In the l>ea<lloi'l<. 

, Helena, Mont., Jan. ll.^Yesterday 
afternoon Messrs. Sanders and Powers, 
who were elected United .States senators 
by the republican house and senate, 
made formal application to Governor 
Toole for certificates of election. Their 
request was denied on the ground that 
their election was illegal, and also be- 
cause of the fact that Governor Toole 
had already given certificates of election 
to Messrs. Clark and Maginnis, elected 
by the democrats. 

The legislative deadlock continues in 
full force, and republicans have decided 
to be calm so far as the senate is con* 
cerned, by unseating Mr. McNamara 
democratic, who is ineligible l)ecause o^ 
his l)eing a federal official. This will 
give the republicans full and free co; 
trol of tbe senate. 



TO- SPY OUT LAND. 



steel Barge Officers go West 

to Look Up a Yard 

Location. 



Northern 
Look 



Pacific Officials 
Over Terminal 
Plans. 



NOT T HE BEN DERS. 

Women Couriued for Muider Were Not 
tile Kaunas Benders. 

Kansas City, Mo., Jan. 11. - It is alto- 
gether probable that tbe two women al- 
leged to be Mrs. John and Kate Bender, 
who are now confined in La Belle county 
jail awaiting trial for the murder of Dr. 
York, will be lil)erated in a fa.v- days. 
An attorney of this city reprecpnted tl^ 
women at their preliminary fnal. r 

Since that time he has been quietly at 
work collecting proof which will estab- 
lish the fact that the women are 
.Mrs. Almira Griffith and Mrs. Sarah 
E. Davis. He now claims to have 
affidavits showing that from 1870 to 
1874 these two women were m Michigan. 
The crimes of which the Benders are 
charged were all committed during these 
years. On being acquainted with this 
fact the prosecuting attorney of La Belle 
county wrote the attorney for the de- 
fendants, telling him that if he could 
prove these tacts by affidavits he would 
discharge the prisoners. Mr. James will 
leave for Oswego next week with his 
affidavits. 

FUNERAL OF THE EMPRESS. 



This afternoon Capt. Alex. McDougall, 
general manager American Steel Barge 
company of this city, and Capt. Thomas 
Wilson of Cleveland, owner of very large 
vessel interests and a heavy stockholder 
in the Barge company, left on special car 
for the Pacific coast. They go as a com- 
mittee of the Steel Barge company to 
look up matters connected with a large 
contract lately made by the company for 
coal-carrying on the Pacific. 

This carrying contract is for a term of 
ten yea"s, and it it at such a rate as to 
make the company feel sure tdat there 
is an immense profit in the time. It 
will necessitate the building of 
thirty or forty whale-back ships 
for this trade alone, and it io 
chiefly to see about the building of 
these ships that this committee goes 
west. It is not decided whether to 
buUd them there or here. It is quite 
probable that the steel for these vessels 
for the Pacific will be worked into 
shapes and sizes here. If so the Duluth 
yard must be still further greatly in- 
creased in size and imi>ortance. 

In this connection it might be said 
that the uOOO tons of steel plates bought 
a short time ago by the Steel Barge com- 
pany from Carnegie, Phipps & Co., cost 
$2G,">,000, and not $.300,000 as reported. 
The price for that quantity of steel 
at present would be about $.300,000. 

RAIL MATTERS. 



All 



That Remains of the iCmpress Augusta 
Consiifned to Kartb. 
Berlin, Jan. 11. — The funeral of Em- 
press Augusta took place today. The 
weather was brilliant. Court Chaplain 
Koegel delivered an oration in the 
chapel of the castle where the remains 
were lying. His discourse was based on 
the motto of the dead empress: "Be 
joyful in hope, patient in adversity and 
steadfast in prayer." He extolled her 
fear of Grod, her devotion to duty, her 
charity and sincerity and her love for 
her husband and her fatherland. 



Pentecost Band. 

Tuscola, III., Jan. 11.— The Pentecost 
Band of Faith-Healer are in trouble 
here again. Citizens living in the 
vicinity of the church where they hold 
forth, having become provoked by their 
boisterous manner of holding meetings, 
which conlinue up to 2 o'clock at night, 
yesterday had warrants issued for the 
arrest of some twenty of the band, in- 
cluding Rev. Vivian A Dake, the origin- 
ator and founder of the Pentecost band; 
Rev. Thomas Helson, another high 
priest; Rev. I. A. Ulness, Rev. Charles 
Bryant, Rev. Frederick Osborn and a 
number of the young women who travel 
with them. 



Northern I'aciflc Ottlcials Here on Import- 
ant liuslness; Otiier Kail News 

W. S. Mellen, general manager, and M. 
C. Kimberly, general superintendent, 
officials of the Northern Pacific road, 
arrived in the city this morning from 
Brainerd. They did not remain long in 
the city, but departed about 10 o'clock 
for West Duluth. Before going, how- 
ever, they made an examination of the 
Pacific's terminals in the city. 

Their business here is in connection 
with the recent purchase from the St. 
Paul «fe Duluth road of half of that com- 
pany's interest in the line between the 
Union depot and Fond du Lac. The 
Pacific road is to put in new side tracks 
at onco at West Duluth, and build a 
freight depot, coal yard and warehouse. 
It is said that plans are now being made 
for the investment of the $1,000,000 voted 
..'. the r0(!eat meeting to be expended 
here in extensive terminal improvements 
between Duluth and Fond du Lac and 
on the harbor front. Mr. Mellen, in ex- 
planation of his visit here, springs the 
old chestnut of "tour of inspection." 

H. J. Payne has been appointed chief 
engineer of the Zenith City Short line, 
ani C. H. V. Davis, consulting engineer. 

The Northern Pacific road continue 
allowing an excess weight of 4000 lbs. on 
40,000 lb. cars. 

Omaha engines had to buck snow out 
uf the yards this morning before business 
could go on uninterruptedly. 

No changes in rates have been re- 
ported at Duluth offices today. The re- 
sult of the conference of Michigan roads 
has not yet been ascertained here. 

In 1889 twenty-five roads were sold at 
foreclosure, comprising 2930 miles of 
track, and with capital stock and funded 
debt of $1.37,815,(X)0. During the same 
time twenty-two roads, with 3800 miles 
of track, $85,000,000 funded debt and 
$99,664,000 capital stock, went into re- 
ceivers' hands. 

The Milwaukee, Lake Shore & West- 
ern road has just sent in an order for 
some new engines. 

The Eastern Minnesota road will begin 
running short line trains between Du- 
luth and West Superior early next 
spring. 



A t're^r Savefl. 

New York, Jan. 11. — The steamship 
Stag arrived from Bremen bringing all 
the crew of the wrecked ship Shakes- 
peare, with the exception of the captain, 
who died at sea. The Shakespeare sailed 
from Hamburg for this port about three 
months ago and was not heard from 
until Dec. 18, when she was sighted by 
the steamship Nestonan from Glasgow 
to Philadelphia. The Nestorian at- 
tempted to take off the men, but was 
unable to do so, and the wrecked vessel 
was lost sight of. On Dec. 22 the steam- 
ship Sardinia sighted tbe Shakespeare, 
and then no trace of life could be dis- 
covered. 

Moving on the ('<i-ur d'Alene Lands. 

Rathdbum, Idaho, Jan. ll.^For sev- 
eral months would-be settlers on the 
C<eur d'Alene reservation have been 
eathering in anticipation of the opening 
of the reservation. Now there is a 
steady movement toward the reserva- 
tion. The weather is warm and there is 
BO little snow on the ground that set- 
tlers have but slight trouble in making 
selections. The land ceded ^ the gov- 
ernment comprises more than 200,000 
acres of the finest land in northern 
Idaho and eastern Washington. It lies 
along the valley of the Clearwater along 
the tributaries of the Columbia. 



The Little King:. 
Madrid, Jan. 11. — The condition of 
the King this morning is improved. He 
slept at intervals during the night. 
Special mass for his recovery was cele- 
brated at 2 o'clock this morning. 

Possibly Warmer. 
St. Paul., Jan. 10. — The following mes- 
sage has been received by tbe local 
signal officer from Washington: Host 
cold wave signal, temperature will fall to 
about 10' below zero by 8 a. m. Jan. 12. 



Would Have the Child. 

Decatur, 1)1., Jan. 11. — There was an 
exciting incident at the Church street 
school today when Mrs. R. Bullett, 
matron for the Home for the Friendless 
at Indianapolis, Ind., and Mrs. Henry 
Knigh of the same city appeared there 
to carry away little Fannie Koder, aged 
6 years, a member of the family of 
Henry Beik. The child is a waif, and 
when an infant was taken out of the 
waifs' home by Mrs. KrugH when she 
was Mrs. Koder. She kept the child 
three years and then placed her in 
charge of Mrs. Henry Beik. The last 
woman now refuses to surrender the 
child without legal process. Marshal 
Mason appeared at the school house at 
the instance of Beik, and subsequently 
Mayor Kernan and the city attorney. 

The Gulf Stream Hasn't Warped. 

Wou.A^TON, Mass., Jan. 11. — Capt. 
Henry F. Picking, the hydrographer of 
the navy department at Washington, 
writing of the remarkable change in the 
climate, in reply to a communication 
from a resident of Wollaston, summarily 
disposes of the Gulf stream theory. He 
says: "We have no reports of observa- 
tions to show that the course of the Gulf 
stream has for a considerable length of 
time differed from its mean position, and 
we should have received such reports 
had there been a change. This direct 
evidence that the mild weather along 
the coast is not caused by a change in 
tbe course of the Gulf stream is supple- 
mented by the fact that continuous mild 
weather has prevailed far in the interior 
to tbe westward of the Alleghanies, 
where the effect on the weather of even 
a considerable change in the course of 
the Gulf stream must be inappreciable." 



J. A. Boggs offers lots near Hazelwood 
at low prices and easy terms. Laboring 
men can obtain houses in that neighbor 
hood, by applyinf? at his office. 



WILL TRY TO KEEP UP. 



Can Repudiate Their Bonds. 

Springfield, 111., Jan. 11. — Judge 
Gresham yesterday handed down his de- 
cision in the United States court in th < 
case of the Citizens Savings and lioan 
association of Cleveland, Ohio, vs. the 
county of Perry. The decision is in 
favor of Perry county. The suit involved 
the validity of $100,000 of bonds issued 
in aid of the Hester & Tamoroa railroad, 
and a like sum in aid of the Belleville & 
Southern railroad. The litigation has 
been standing some time. The county 
claimed the bonds to be invalid and re- 
fused to pay them. 

The Lind Bill. 

Washington, Jan. 10.— The Minnesota 
delegation decided to support the Lind 
bill, which proposes to hold sessions of 
the district court at St. Paul, Minneapo- 
lis, Duluth, Fergus Falls, Mankato and 
Winona. This will insure the passage of 
the bill. 



' H you want to make money quick 
call on Merritt & Leddell, room i 
FarguBson building. 



- ' a ^ ■ I 



!■ I I i^fc ■ 




IT WILL BE A 




Have Miles of Electric 



The American Buildine & Loan Associii- 
tion Makiug Quiet Moves. 

St. Paul, Jan. 11.— [Special.]— Evi- 
dently the American Building & Loan Minneapolis and St. Paul Wil 
association is determined to forestall tie 
threatened course of the stockholders. 
Already $130,000 additional securities 
are filed with the state auditor. Th a 
is the gross amount, tbe n<'t 
being about one-half that sum. 
The troubles and complicatioi s 
will be heard before Governcr 
Merriam next Tuesday. The stock- 
holders who are endeavoring to recovt r 
the moneys they have invested, and will 
be represented by Hon. Freeman P. 
Lane of Minneapolis, while the direci.- 
ors of the association will be repreii- 
ented by Hon. Eugene M. Wilson. The 
hearing had been set for today, but ws s 
postponed by mutual consent, owing to 
Mr. Wilson s illness. 



A CHANGE SOON. 

A Changre in Uuluth Laud Office Officia s 
to be Made 

Washington, Jan. 11— [Special.]- A 
change will soon be made in the Dulutb 
land office. Commissioner McGinnii, 
democratic, is the man that will have t o 
go. Candidates for the place are Alex- 
ander Fraser, Monroe Nichols, E. V\ 
Mee, H. C. Kendall and Frank Burki>. 
The lucky candidate is not yet decided 
upon, but the decieion will soon te 
reached. The selection will be made fc r 
business reasons. 



COOL JUDGE COOLEY. 



How He 



Meld a Madiuan 
His Tact. 



in Check tiy 



Detroit, Mich., Jan. 11 . — Early lai t 
evening Judge Thomas M. Cooley, <>f 
Ann Arbor, was sitting reading in hs 
library, when his negro coachman, armel 
with a double barrelled shotgun, entered. 

The judge was satisfied from his aj- 
pearance that he had l)ecome insano, 
but betraying no alarm he asked bin 
what was the matter. The negro repliei 
that he had decided to kill the whola 
family, as they talked too much and left 
him no time to think. The judge fold 
him he agreed with him and that hs 
would attend to it. By tbe use of con- 
summate tact tbe judge succeeded i 1 
mollifying the madman until he at laet 
laid down his gun and left the rooir. 
Judge Cooley then telephoned the polics 
and the man was put under arrest. 

A Valuable Horse Iturned. 

Versailles, Ky., Jan. 11.— Fire in 
Macy & Bros.' stables, in which th) 
horse Bellboy was burned, was discov 
ered about 4 o'clock this morning. Thj 
fire is supposed to have been incendiary 
and when discovered almost the entiri 
structure was in flames. Bellboys' quai- 
ters were adjacent to the office of th ? 
stables where a man was on guard. An 
effort was made to reach the horse but 
the animal refused to move and beforj 
sufficient assistance could be had t) 
force him from the building the intens) 
heat drove the would-be rescuers awa} . 
The entire loss is estimated a t §350,00( >. 

COLORED MEN. 



Lines. 

Spellbinder Depew's Address 
Before the Fair Com- 
mittee. 



National Colored Men's Con- 

vention Discusses the 

South. 



avenue line. 

Paul and 

council so 

to have the consent 

before the substitution 



St. Paul, Jan. 11.— The success of the 
Fourth avenue electric line in Minne- 
apolis has decided the companies, of 
which Thomas Lowry is president, to 
make electricity supersede horses, steam 
and cables, excepting only the Selby 
This will be done in St. 
in Minneapolis if the 
orders it. He in obliged 
of that body 

can be made, 
and to that end has requested a special 
meeting of the council. In St. Paul the 
situation is different. He has obtained 
already official permission to use what- 
ever motive power he wishes. Accon^ 
ingly he will begin at once in the spring 
to transform the car lines there into a 
complete electric system. 

The consideration that led to the de- 
cision was the satisfaction which the 
Fourth avenue electric line has given in 
Minneapolis. A strong pressure was 
brought to bear by citizens who saw in 
tbe new motive power tbe greatest possi- 
ble merit. The street car company lie- 
came convinced that the electricity on 
Fourth avenue had been very satis- 
factory. 

So extensively is the line patronized 
that there is quite a noticeable discrimi- 
nation of traffic on parallel lines, and the 
Street Car company has been obliged to 
attach an extra car to the electric line. 
Under all these circumstances it was be- 
lieved to be the most satisfactory thing 
to abandon the present plans for cables 
and supplant them by electricity should 
the people through the council so desire. 



By Lightning. 

Minneapolis, Jan. 11. — [Special.] — The 
city council is in session to consider the 
advisability of permitting Thomas Lowry 
to substitute electric for his proposed 
cable lines. 



THE CHIEF SPELLBINDER. 



A Lively Time Expecled at Their Comin ; 
Convention. 

Chicago, Jan. 11. — The indications ar i 
that there will be lively times at th j 
national colored men's convention which 
assembles here on Wednesday next. 

So e months ago a committee cf 
representatives of the race, representin j 
the principal states of the Union, issue 1 
a call for a national convention to ba 
held in June to consider the conditio 1 
of the colored people of the South, and 
to take steps in the direction of 
securing for them those political right 3 
which, as alleged by the authors of th j 
call, they are now deprived. 

Just as soon as this call had been give 1 
to the public, however; Thomas I'. 
Fortune, a well-known colored editor ct 
New York, announced that a conventio 1 
would be held in Nashville on Jan. 15, t) 
arrange for the organization of state 
leagues of colored men throughout the 
country on the plan of the Irish Nationi 1 
league. Subsequently the place cf 
meeting was changed to Chicago. 

This movement has aroused the pre - 
moters of the summer gathering, and fc r 
the past two weeks nightly meetings 
have been held to denounce the comin ? 
and those responsible for it, and at 
which Fortune has been roughly handle 3 
as a political adventurer who is en- 
deavoring to deceive and mislead th e 
people of his race. 

As a climax a national address ha s 
been issued, signed by Rev. C. G. Bcxiti 
of Kansas; Alexander Clark, Iowa; Job a 
G. Jones, Illinois; John L. Waller, Kai - 
sas, and Daniel Lucas, Missouri, insist- 
ing that no attention should be paidt) 
the call for next week's convention, an i 
urging that delegates be elected only to 
the gathering of June next. 

The Madison street theater has beei 
engaged for the Fortune meeting, but 
according to the present program, the 
anti's propose to take it by storm; an i 
there are visions of revolvers and razoi s 
ana galore. 

Hopes For Ktcovery. 

Col. Dudley, vice-proeident and ger - 
eral manager of the St. Paul & Duluta 
railroad, is still seriously ill. The left 
side of his head and neck and the right 
side of his body are paralyzed.His phj - 
sician now feels encouraged by moie 
favorable symptoms. Col. Dudley's soa 
and his niece, Mrs. Park Von Wedeln- 
taedt, have been in cMjnstaut attendance 
on him since yesterday afternoon. 



Attention, Butchers! 

A carload of light dressed hogs 
received at Clark & Metz. 



juct 



Chauncey Uepew Kndeavors to8]>eIlbind 
Congress as to New York. 

Washing j on, Jan. 11.— Announcjement 
that New York, through her distin- 
guished representatives, would present 
her claims for the location of the pro- 
posed Worlds fair before tbe senate com- 
mittee on quadri-centennial today, was 
sufficient to attract a crowd to the Capi- 
tol that ccxupletely exhausted all accom- 
monations in the senate reception room 
where the hearing was held. 

Mr. Depew was tbe first speaker. He 
began to speak in a husky tone of voicse, 
but it soon cleared. He was listened to 
throughout with tbe closest attention 
and frequently interrupted by applause 
from his loyal and admiring New York 
supporters. 

He said: "The New York delegation 
expresses its obligation to the commit- 
tee for according to it a hearing on a 
day when it could conveniently attend. 
We are here to the number of 100 or 
more, representing every interest, to 
weigh the claim of New York for the 
Worlds fair. 

"An American who was at Paris dur- 
ing the past summer, and saw the great 
exhibition there, became impressed with 
the fact that there was no greater neces- 
sity laid on the American people than that 
of holding an exhibition which should 
be equal, if it did not excel that. That 
was the finest exhibition of arts, of 
manufactures, of progress of civilization 
of tbe world that has been seen. Every 
visitor was impressed by the appearance 
made by the older countries of Europe, 
by the nations of Asia and Africa, by 
Great Britain and her dependencies, by 
Mexico and South American republics. 
It was a presentation of their products, 
their manufactures, their skill, which 
was entirely satis^tory to them, and 
impressive on all other nations. 

"The one spot where there was a fail- 
ure to present adequately or respectably 
the products, progress, manufacturing 
skill of tbe United States was in the 
exhibit of the United states themselves. 
The impression was produced that the 
United States might be immense in area, 
might have an enormous population, 
might have free institutions, but that, 
in competition for the trade of the 
world it was deficient. The only thing 
there which attracted much attention 
was our petrified wcxxi. 



The New Asylum. 

Fergus Falls, Jan. 11. — The state 
board for insane asylum trustees are 
today to arrange for opening the new 

asylum. 

Untrammelled Saloons. 

Huron, S. D., Jan. 11. — Tbe board of 
county commissioners has decided posi- 
tively to take no action Icwking to the 
licensing of saloons till the legislature 
passes the prohibition law. This gives 
the saloons tree sailing for at least a 
month without license. 



REAL ESTATE 



Special Bargains I Snaps. 

3 Lots In Endion, $4500. 

2 Lots in Highland Park, $2500. 
20 Acres in I 0-50- 1 4 at a bargain. 
63 Lots adjoining London, cheap. 



A few of the choicest lots in Murray &. Howe's Addition for 
sale on easy terms. 

Twenty acres on the hill at a great bargain. 



J. M. ROOT & CO., 



Room Oi M«tropolitan Block. 



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DLTIiUTH BVBNIXG HEBALD: JA:NTrABT 11 1890 



DULUTH - AND - SUPERIOR 





f- 



OIFB'IOEJS : 



35 FARGUSSON BUILDING, DUl^UTH. | OPPOSITE EUCLID HOTEL, SUPERIOR. 



J- 



TIIE OAY OP CAPTURE. 



A Hitherto Unpublished Official 

Document of the 

War. 



The Officer Who Took 
Davis Tells of His 
Seizure. 



JefT 



as 



Undoubted Facts 

"Disguise" Worn 
Davis. 



to 
by 



mand of Capt. Hathaway, directing him 
to picket the river, scout the country, 
etc., in accordance with orders. At i 
o'clock I put the column in motion, 
moving down the river road, a distance 
of twelve miles, to a point known ae 
Wilcoxs Mills, thence by a blind woods 
road, through an almost unbroken waste 
of pine forest for a distance of 18 miles 
in a southwesterly direction to Irwins 
ville, which was reached about 10 o'clock 
on the morning of the 10th. Here pass 
ing my command as Confederate, and 
enquiring for '"our train," I learned from 
the inhabitants that a train and party 
about dark the night 
IJ^ miles out on the 
I at once turned my 
direction, impressing «a 
Alfter moving to 
the camp, I halted 



had encamped 
previous about 
Abbyville road, 
column in that 
negro for a guide, 
within half a mile of 



the 



The Herald presents through 
kindness of H. B. Moore, a friend of 
General Pritchard, the following letter 
of Colonel Pritchard to Edwin M. Stan- 
ton, secretary of war, covering in its 
details the pursuit and capture of 
Jefferson Davis. Tfce official document 
has never been published m full verba- 
tim in whieh shape it is now given after 
a lapse of nearly twenty-five years. 

H'dq'bs foukth Mich. Cavalry, ) 
Wasuingtox, D. C, May 25, 1865. ) 

Sib: I have the honor to report that 
in obedience to orders received from 
Col. RH. G. Minty, commanding division- 
I left Macon, Georgia, at 8 o'clock p. m- 
on the 7th inst.,in command of thePourth 
Michigan cavalry, with a numerical 
strength of 419 men and twenty officers, 
with directions to move down the south 
bank of the Ocoaulgeo river from 75 
to 100 miles, to take 

possession of all the ferries below Hawk- 
insville; picket the river as far as the 
•trength of my regiment would permit, 
and to Bcout the country on both sides 
of the river for the purpose of capturing 
Jeff Davis and party, or to capture any 
other government parties who might be 
fleeing from Richmond in that direction. 
I marched the command all night until 
8 o'clock a. m. of the 8th, having marched 
36 miles, when I halted 5 hours, rested 
and fed my command. Moving on again, 
marched 15 miles further and encamped 
for the night 3 miles below HawkinsviUe 
having marched 51 miles inside of 24 
hours, including all halts. At 4 o'clock, 
a. m. of the 9th, I moved out in the 
direction of Abbyville, where I discov- 
ered the first traces of the object of our 
search. Here I learned that a train of 
12 wagons and 2 ambulances had crossed 
the Ocmulgee river at Browns ferry, IJ^ 
miles above Abbeyville about 12 o'clock 
on the previous night; had stopped at 
Abbeyville long enough to feed and 
moved on again. I here met Lieutenant 
Colonel Harnden of the First Wisconsin 
cavalry, who informed me that he, with 
70 men, was following on the track of 
the train and that his men were from 
1 to 2 hours in advance, and as he 
said he had ample force to contend 
with that with the train, I decided 
not to move on the same road, and con- 
tinued my course three miles further 
down the river, where I learned addi- 
tional facts. 

Accordingly, I ordered a detail of 128 
men and seven officers (^beside myself) of 
the best mounted men in the command, 
leaving the^rest of the men under com- ' 



the under cover of a slight eminence, dis- 
mounted 25 men and sent them, under 
command of Lieut. Purinton, to make 
the circuit of the camp and gain a posi- 
tion in its rear, and thus cut off all 
possibility of escape, and with special 
directions to execute the movement if 
possible without discovery, but if dis- 
covered and an alarm was raised, I 
would immediately charge the camp 
from the front, when he was to operate 
with his command from any point 
which he might occupy. That if no 
alarm was raised I should consider that 
he had gained the position directed, 
where he was to rest until I should com- 
mence the attack from the front. 

Upon consideration, decided to delay, 
as it was now after 2 o'clock in the 
morning, the moon was getting low, and 
the deep shadows of the forest were 
falling rapidly, rendering it easy for per- 
sons to escape undiscovered to the 
woods and swamps. After waiting an 
hour or more and just as the earliest 
dawn appeared, I put the column in mo- 
tion and was enabled to approach within 
four or five rods of the camp undiscov- 
ered, when a dash was ordered and in an 
instant the whole camp, with its in- 
mates, was ours. A chain of guards 
was thrown around and dismounted sen- 
tries placed at the tents and wagons. 
The surprise was so complete and the 
movement so sudden, that none of the 
enemy were able to make the slightest 
defense, or even arouse from their slum- 
bers in time to grasp their weapons 
which were lying by their sides. 

At this moment a new scene opened, 
destined in its mournful results to cloud 
the otherwise perfect and glorious suc- 
cess of our expedition. We had held 
the possession of the camp but a few 
minutes and not long enough to ascer- 
tain the extent of our capture, when 
sharp firing was commenced between 
the disraountedforce under Lieut. Purin- 
ton and what was supposed at the time 
to be the rebel force guarding the train. 
The firing was about 100 rods in the 
rear of the camp, and across a narrow 
swamp. I immediately ordered all my 
forces to the scene, leaving only sufficient 
to guard the camp and prisoners. On 
arriving upon the ground I found my 
men engaging a force of dismounted 
men, concealed behind trees. I at once 
formed my men in line, dismounted 
them, threw out a line of skirmishers, 
when I became apprehensive that we 
were contending with some of our own 
men, from the determination displayed 
on their part and the peculiar report of 
their firearms. I ordered my men at 
once to cease firing, and rode over 
toward our opponents and halloed to 
them, asking who they were, and re- 
ceiving the reply, "First Wisconsin." 
This mistake cost the lives of two men 
killed and a lieutenant severely wounded 
in the Fourth Michigan and three men 
severely and several slightly wounded in 
the First Wisconsin. 
****** 

As aeon as the firing had ceased I re- 



turned to camp and took an inventory 
of our capture, when I ascertained that 
we had captured Jeff Davis, his wife, 
and four children, John H. Reagan (his 
postmaster general). Cols. Johnson and 
Lubbock (iiides-de-camps), Burton X. 
Harrison (his private secretary), Major 
Maurand, Capt. Moody, Lieutenant 
Hathaway, Jeff D. Howell (midshipman 
m the rebef army), and 13 private 
soldiers, besides Miss Maggie Howell (a 
sister of Mrs. Davis), 2 waiting maids (1 
white and 1 colored, and several servants. 
We also captured 5 wagons, 3 ambu- 
lances, about 15 hor8es,and from 25 to 30 
mules. The train was mostly loaded 



Jefferson Davia But I would not close 
this report without recording my evi- 
dence of the high merits due to every 
officer and soldier in the command for 
their earnest zeal and untiring persever- 
ance through many sleepless nights and 
weary marches, going entirely without 
food for 48 consecutive hours, and it 
is with great consolation that I am able 
to state that whjitever efforts were put 
forth, either by individuals or by the 
command, for the capture of Davis, they 
were not called forth by the glitter of 
gold or excited by prospective rewards, 
but were actuated solely by patriotism 
and the highest sense of the soldiers 



with commissary stores and private bag- j duty, for no knowledge of the President's 

' proclamation or General Wilson's order 

offering rewards, were received until two 
days after the capture. It is indeed 
hard to individualize where all have 
done their duty, but still I would make 
special mention of those assigned to im- 
portant duties, and who performed those 
duties well, among whom are C:ipt. 
Hathaway, Capt. Charles S. Hudson, in 
command of the advance guard of four- 
teen men, and who led the column into 
the camp; Lieuts. Silas J. Stauber and 
Henry S. Bautelle, who were command- 
ing fifty men each in detachments; Lieut. 



gage of the party. Upon returning to 
camp I was accosted by Davis, from 
among the prisoners, who asked if I was 
the officer in command. Upon assuring 
him that I was, and asking whom I was 
to call him, he replied that I would call 
him Davis, and, after a moment's hesita- 
tion, he said that was his name. He 
suddenly drew himself up in true royal 
dignity and exclaimed: 

"I suppose that you consider it brav- 
ery to charge a train of defenseless 
women and children, but it is theft — it 
is vandalism." 



After allowing time to prepare break- A. B. Purinton, who had charge of dis 



fast, I mounted them on their own 
horses, taking one of the ambulances for 
my wounded and one of the wiigons for 
the dead, using the other for the con- 
veyance of the women and children, and 
started on my return to Abbyville, where 
I arrived at sunset. Here I halted for 
the night and resumed my march toward 
Macon at an early hour on the morning 
of the 11th inst. On the afternoon of 
the 11th, and when several miles below 
HawkinsviUe, we met the rest of our 
brigade just coming out from Macon, 
and received from them the first knowl- 
edge of the President's proclamation, 
accompanied by Gen. Wilson's order, 
offering a reward for the capture of 
Davis. 

Retaining my independent command 
I continued my march to Macon where 
I arrived at 3 o'clock p. m. on the 13th. 
While nine miles out of town, I received 
orders to provide myself with a special 
of three officers and twenty men from 
my regiment and prepare to depart at 
once for Washington as special guard 
for Davis and party, also to take 150 men 
to act as train guard as far as Atlanta. 
I left Macon by special on the evening 
of the 13th, under the direction of Maj.- 
Gen. Wilson, having turned over all the 
private soldiers captured with Davis and 
his party, except *iwo, and received an 
accession of Clement C. Clay and wife. 



On the afternoon of that day (May 22) 
the prisoners Davis and Clay were trans- 
ferred to the casemates of Fortress Mon- 
roe, and turned over to Brevet Maj.- 
Gen. Miles, the Fourth Michigan cavalry 
acting as special escort, after which it 
was temporarily assigned quarters within 
the fort. On tbe afternoon of the 23rd 
I received orders from the war depart- 
ment, through Gen. Miles, directing me 
to procure the disguise worn by Davis at 
the time of his capture, and proceed to 
Washington and report to the secretary 
of war. Accordingly 1 received from 
Mrs. Davis a lady's waterproof cloak or 
robe, which Mrs. Davis said was worn 
by Davis as a disguise at the time of his 
capture, and which was identified by the 
men who saw it on him at the time. On 
the morning following the balance of the 
disguise was procured, which consisted 
of a shawl which was identified and 
admitted to be the one by Mrs. Davis. 
Those articles I brought to Washington 
and turned over to the secretary of war. 
QThis closes my account of the capture 
and custody, up to the time of his being 
turned over to the United States author- 
ities, of the great conspirator and traitor 



mounted men, making the circuit of the 
enemy's camp: Lieuts. Dickinson and 
Davis, for general duties as aides, and 
Bennett commanding rear guard. All 
are entitled to the highest praise, and, 
in my judgment, deserve promotion. I 
would also mention the names of Cor- 
porals Mungerof Company C, Crittenden 
of Company E, together with Privates 
Bullard of Company C, Adrian Ree and 
Daniel Edwards of Company L, who 
\vere present at the halting of Davis, be- 
sides several others. 

In conclusion, at the request that I 
should state in my report to whom, in 
my judgment, the reward offered ought 
to be given, I would say that I am con- 
vinced that to no one individual does it 
justly belong, for whilst one man might 
have been fortunate enough to have said 
"Halt" to Davis first, it was while .le 
was yet within the regular line of sen- 
tries thrown around the camp, and while 
some man was doing this (of which there 
were several claimants), others were per- 
forming equally important duties in 
guarding, fighting, etc., and I feel that 
in no case should the reward be granted 
to a less number than the 128 men and 8 
officers who were actually present at the 
time of Davis' capture, and I am in- 
clined to the opinion that it should be 
distributed to the 419 men and 20 officers 
comprising the expedition. The whole 
is respectfully submitted, and I have the 
honor to subscribe myself, 

B. D. Pritchard, 

Lieut.-Col., Fourth Michigan Cavalry. 



Railroad Men Never Know. 

Burdette: "There isn't a business in 
the world," remarked the division super- 
intendent, "that can show one tithe of 
the energy, progressive spirit and gen- 
eral enterprise that the railroad busi- 
ness does." "Oh, come off," said the 
reporter, "why, there isn't enough en- 
terprise in your whole corporation to 
run a six-column weekly with boiler- 
plate matter. Last week you run a 
gravel train into your limited express at 
a water tank, and the next day you 
broke down a bridge and dumped thirty- 
two freight-cars into the river, and there 
wasn't a man about the general ollk-es, 
from president to door-keeper, that ever 
knew a thing about it until they read 
an account of it in The Hustler, and that 
was witten by a new reporter working 
on space to get in. Enterprise!" and 
the disgusted scribbler went away to 
"do" an embezzelment that the directors 
hadn't heard of yet. 



IT MIQH r BE FULL OF LOVE. 

[Geralil Mussey 1 
Lo! plenty ripens round u8, yet awkke-t the 

cry tot bread. 
And the inlllionn stiU are tolUngr. crushed and 

clad In rag-s, unfed! 
While sunny hills and valleys richly blush 

with fruit and grain. 
But the uaupers in the palace rob their toilin«r 

lollow-nien. 
This world Is full of beauty, as other 

al)ovo. 
And if wo did our duty, it might be full of 

love. 



Worth Workiui!^ For. 

The directors of the New Ycrk Central 
& Hudson River road have presented 
Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan with a hand- 
service of plate as a testimonial in 
recognition of his services in the reor- 
ganiziition of the New York West Shore 
& Buffalo road, for which labors Mr. 
Morgan had declined to accept anv com- 
pensation. The New York Tribune says 
of the testimonial: 

The service is in silver gilt and Tiffany 
manufactured it from original designs. 
The center piece is allegorical of har- 
mony among the railroads and is accom- 
panied by four candelabra. Four hand- 
some holders for bonbons, etc., form part 
of the service, and there are twenty-four 
plates, sets of knives and forks, finger 
bowls, holders for cups and saucers, etc. 
The pieces are heavily embossed, with 
borders of fine fretwork. The cost is 
estimated at about $40,000. 

Knows It All. 

New York Times: Speaking of brains, 
the Rome correspondent of the Pall 
Mall Gazette has had a remarkable in- 
terview with Mgr. Satolli, which reveals 
a mental grasp on the part of the pre- 
late fairly noteworthy. The whole re- 
port is a gem, but this is perhaps the 
best thing: "All our bishops in the 
United States," said Satolli, "are treated 
as sovereign princes, and the archbishop 
of Ireland is the personal friend of Har- 
rison. As a democrat, he belongs to his 
party. He told Harrison that unless he 
would pledge himself to make conces- 
sions to the Catholic schools all the 
Catholics would withdraw their votes 
from him, so he was obliged to do so. 
The public corporations, too, are only 
too ready to fulfill the wishes of our 
bishops, even before they are expressed." 



Our Sixteentli Semi-lnnual Red Figure Sale. 

CLOTHING- 

The Men's and Beys' Clothing catches the bargain mania 
that now runs all over the store. Not because the clothing is 
Old— It isn t; not that we are badly overstocked— we aren't: 
not on account of dull sales— sold more than last winter; but 
siniply because we set out to make great sales this January, 
and bargain music is the only music for double quick sales in 
present trade conditio is. 

MEISJ'S OVERCOATS. t 

We are selling Fur-trimmed Overcoats at actual cost prices. / 
I he sorts for a mild winter are reduced in common with others. / 

MEN S STORM GOATS. 

They will be needed yet, but to hurry your needsthey come 
$2oVom^$25 «I2; $12 from $16; $15 from $20; 

BOYS' CAPE OVERCOATS AND SUITS. / 

Some special bargains in our Boys' and Children's Clothing / 
Departments. We give you all the profits. ^ f 

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WHOLESALE. RETAIL. 



Dear G<k1 I what hosts are trampled 'mid tbia 

killing crush for gold I 
What noble hearts are aapp'd of love, what 

spirits loee life's iiold I 
Yet u merry world it might be, opulent for all, 

and aye, 
With Its lands that asit for labor, and its wealth 

that wastes awuy. 
Th'» world is lull of' beauty, as other worlds 

above. 
And If we did our duty, it mlgrht be full of 

lore. 

♦ A LETTER. 



Professor J. W. Shipley of Saratoga, 
N. Y., has designed what will be known 
as the Three Americas' Flag. The field 
is blue and is decorated with an eagle 
guardian of the Western hemisphere, 
surrounded by a symbolic wedding ring, 
worlds j '^^^ background is formed by golden 
' stars arranged in the form of a Southern 
cross. The design seems to be a pretty 
one, but what is the flag for? 




R. KROJANKER, 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 

Alt jring, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
kinds of furs a specialty, i®- Good workm . v 
ship guaranteed. 



HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 

Duluth, Minn. 



209 East Superior Street. 



[The Century! 
8hP wrote a letter with her eyes. 

Well ttlle<l with words of bliss; 
Then, like a orudent maid and wise. 

She sealed It with a kiss. 



AN ARA& SAYINQ. 



back: 



(The Century.] 
Remember, three things come not 
The arrow sent upon its track- 
It will not swerve, It will not stay 
Its speed; it flies to wound or slay. 

The spoken word, so soon forgot 
By tlieo; but it has perished not: 
In oihor hearu 'tis living still. 
And d'>lng work for tgocA or Hi. 

And the lost "pportunlty. 

That Cometh back no more to thee. 

In vain thou weepest, in vain doet ream. 

Those three will nevermore return. 



THE BOLTON HOT ITER HEATER 

Has the best record for the longest time 
in the coldest climate. See one set up 
in our store. 

P. V. DV/YER & BROS., 





•<? 




Telephone 179. 



207 W. SUPERIOR STREET. 




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What the Year I 890 Will See 

in Building Outside 

Duluth. 



Work of Three of the Busy Im- 
provement Companies; 
Plans. 



The City Fortunate in Having 

Many of Capital and 

Push. 



Duluth will see more and costlier im- 
proTements made in its suburbs during 
ISOO than during any two years of the 
past. Not only will full 8500,000 be expen- 
ded in suburban improvements, but this 
vast sum will be used to a practical ad- 
vantage, and not to boom property, and 
wheedle investors into putting money 
into lands from which no real benefit or 
profit could be derived. Duluth has got- 
ten past the wild cat boom period of her 
existence, and while The Herald by no 
means makes the statement that the 
land companies do not look at the money 
there is to be made by dealing in sub- 
urban properties, yet they are giving, 
and intend to give, purchasers value for 
value, and not merely to get rid of 
worthless real-estate. 

* * * 

The Bay View Land company intends 
verj- extensive improvements for ISiXt. 
The company was recently incorporated 
with a capital of $700,000. It owns 1300 
acres of land north of West Duluth, 
gently sloping to the south and south- 
west. Already a large sum has been 
expended in getting the property ready 
for residence purposes. One mile of 
streets have been graded and one and 
three-fourths miles of sidewalks built. 

As a means of rapid transit to Bay 
View Heights a cable line '(3lX) feet long 
and costing STo.OlW has b€>en built, and 
was opened to traffic hist October. The 
road climbs the height (500 feet. Trains 
run to connect with the St. Paul & Du- 
luth short line at West Duluth. Com- 
mutation tickets are sold at five cents, 
and sixteen cents for the round trip 
tickets for Duluth. 

Many residences will be built at Bay 
View this year. The company is now 
negotiating with the Minnesota Iron Car 
company to build t^veuty-five houses for 
its employers in Addition No. 1. The 
land company will also erect forty 
houses Itself. Besides these sixty resi- 
dences many who own lots on the 
Heights will build houses there this 
year. 

One hundred men are working clear- 
ing eighty acres, most of the liO acres 
now platted and the plat on this piece 
will be tiled soon. The plat for Divis- 
ion No. '2 will be put on record soon, and 
the lots will be put on the market in 
about three weeks. Other portions of 
the property will be platted as soon as 
advisable. S'ew street will also be graded 
in the spring. 

The company has now under favorable 
cnosideration two improvements 
that will bring Bay View Heights 
into enviable prominence. The 
right of way has been obtained for a 
short line, full guage railway to extend 
from the West Duluth terminus of the 
Incline to Union depot, Duluth, giving 
this city and its great suburb another 
rail connection. The new line runs from 
the West Duluth terminus near the Iron 
Bay plant along the bay front, entering 
the main city near the Scott «!c Holston 
mill, thence paralleling the St. Paul Jc 
Duluth road to the Union depot. 

Spring will also see another 
and most important line built from the 
northern terminus of the Incline road at 
Bay View Heights thirty miles to the 
Northwest, entering the great timber 
belt north of Cloquet. The road will 
be full guage and will run 
several miles north of the Duluth &. 
Winnipeg line. Surveys have been made 
and work on both roads will begin early 
in the spring, and next fall will see them 
both completed and in operation. 

In clearing Bay View the company 
has left the young trees intact and will 
thus make the suburb as attractive as 
possible. All these improvements will 
cost several hundred thousand dollars. 
« * « 

The Highland Improvement company 
was incorporated Sept. 24 with a capital 
of ?J,a)O,O00. Of this capital $3i'2,000 
was expended in the purchase of real 
estate. The company now owns 1075 
acres of land situated directly north of 
Seventh avenue west. The company 
has been at work clearing and platting 
its land, '2fX) acres of which are now 
ready for sale and will be 
put on the market in about two weeks. 
The remaining 975 will be cleared and 
platted as fast as such improvements 
are found necessary. Two miles of streets 
are to be graded. 

When the company was formed a con- 
tract wae entered into with the Duluth 
Street Railway company for the building 
of a cable line to extend from Michigan 
street along Seventh avenue to Ninth 
street. From Ninth the line will run for 
halt a mile along any streets or avenues 
the Improvement company may deem 
proper. Profiles for the line have been 
received and a meeting of the Railway 
company will be held next week to con- 
sider and decide upon plans, etc. The 
cable line will cost in the neighborhood 
of $200,000. In the agreement with the 
Cable company for building this 
line the Improvement company guar- 
antees to expend this spring $S),000 
on street improvements. Probably much 
more than this ^50,000 will be spent in 
this work. There is under consideration 
the building of a number of cottages for 
rental, but it is the policy of the com- 
pany to sell its lota to those who will 
improve. Other building improvements 
are also under consideration. 

* * * 

Among the improvement companies is 
the Spirit Lake Land & Improvement 
company, with a capital of ^250,000. 
This company owns 3o3 acres of land on 
the northwest shore of Spirit Lake, and 
controls much more. The company made 
many improvements last season. Over 
200 acres were platted topographically, 
and two miles of street graded and im- 
proved. A boulevard, eighty feet wide, 
extends around the property, making 
one of the most delightful of drives, 
while another drive, 100 feet in width, 
intersects tlie circular boulevard on the 
lake front. All the depressions in the 
land the company has set aside as parks, 
BO that there are no residence lots, but 
that lie level and high. 

This year the improvement company 
will spend $W,000 on improvements, 
which will make this property a beauti- 
ful pleasure ground. Besides grading 
streets a sewer system will be put in, 
one main sewer running to the lake 
front. Ten busmess men of this city 
have promised to erect residences 
on this property next spring, to cost 
15,000 to ^,000 each. 



As soon as the weather permits, 100 
men will be put to work on clearing, 
grading, etc., and they will be employed 
for the year on these improvements. 

Many improvements will also be made, 
and large sums expended in making a 
a pleasure resort for the summer. A 
bathing ground will be made in the lake, 
with bath houses, etc. Boat houses and 
docks will be built. 

Not least among the improvements 

will be building of a fine summer hotel. 

for this purpose four acres of land have 

been set aside. The building will cost 

about r20,000. 

* * * 

These are but part of the improve- 
ments to be made and monies expended 
in suburban properties for 1880. Fully 
as extensive ones are under contempla- 
tion, which the Herald will give later. 

J. S. 



SPORTING NOTES. 



W. H. K. Pollock, the young English 
chess player, who won the world's prize 
in the international tournament this 
year, is now in Washing£on as the guest 
of the chess players of that city. 

The Oxford and Cambridge cricket 
match for next year has been fixed for 
June 30, July 1 and 2. The Eton and 
Harrow fixture will be decided July 11 
and 12. 

The latest addition to the 2:30 list was 
made in Texas last week. It was the 2- 
year-old colt, Reno's Baby. He got a 
record of 2:28J'2. and is the first Texas 
bred 2-year-old to beat 2:30. 

King, Latham, O'Neil, Boyle &nd 
Baldwin of the St. Louis Brown combi- 
nation that is now in San Francisco have 
signed to play with the Chicago Broth- 
erhood club, and it is expected that 
Comiskey will soon fail into line. 

The question of the admittance of 
pacers to the standard is to be discussed 
by the National association at the meet- 
ing Jan. 17. 

There are now forty -two well-known 
pugilists in 'Frisco either engaged or 
waiting opportunities to fight. They 
are divided as follows: Heavyweights, 
12; middle and welterweights, 13; light- 
weights, 12; featherweights, 3; bantam- 
weights, 1. 

W. H. Crawford, who won $5000 from 
L. J. Rose o2 his wager that Stamboul 
would not trot in 2:12 in 1889, now offers 
to wager ^2500 that Stamboul can beat 
Aalo Alto in a race of mile heats, best 
three in five. The proposition is open 
for a year. 

One of Sexton's strongest character- 
istics in his billiard playing is his judge 
of force. It makes his position play 
quite correct, and if he can turn this to 
as gix>d account at the 8-inch balk line 
as he has in years ^past at other 
styles of play, he will not be far from 
the lead at the end of the coming tour- 
nament. 

Jake Schaefer, the champion billiard 
player, has been presented with an ele- 
gant gold watch by Nicolini in recogni- 
tion of the instruction and entertain- 
ment afforded himself and Patti by the 
wizard. 

Billy Murphy says he is going to chal- 
lenge Danny Needham as soon as he 
gets through with Ike Weir. He says 
he has always fought bigger men than 
himself, and feels sure of defeating the 
St. Paul welterweight. 

Heiser, it is said, made the statement 
recently that there would be but three 
players in the big billiard tournament 
which opens in New York in February. 
Slosson, Daly and himself. This sounds 
rather egotistical, as he ignores Sexton 
altogether. It is doubtful if Ives can 
make much of a showing against the 
men in this tournament, but that he 
will attract much attention is un- 
doubted. 

The Chicago Players league club has 
already chosen its uniforms for nest sea- 
son. The home suit will be of white, 
except a black belt and cap and the 
word "Chicago" m black on the breast. 
The traveling suit will be of black cloth, 
with white cap, belt and stockings, and 
"Chicago" in white on the breast. A 
black jacket will complete the uniform. 

NOTED PEOPLE. 



Theodore D. W^eld, the well known an- 
ti-slavery agitator, celebrated his eighty- 
ninth birthday recently. 

Baron Haussmann, who did so much 
to improve Paris, is now a vigorous old 
man of 80 years. 

Mgr. Sophronius, the Greek patriarch 
of Alexandria, is 99 years of age, and has 
been a priest for seventy years. 

Gen. Abner Doubleday is one of the 
three surviving officers of the garrison 
of Fort Sumter at the time of the first 
bombardment. 

Mrs. Cora Belle Chaska, wife of Chief 
Chaska, and heroine of the sensational 
elopement about two years ago, played 
the role of Santa Glaus at Chief 
Charger's camp, near Forest City, 
Christmas, and made the heart of each 
little papoose happy with a present. 
Cora Belle now has a little papoose of 
her own. 

Maude Howe advises young ladies to 
make their engagements as brief as pos- 
sible. Maude has evidently little faith 
in the constancy of the opposite sex. 

President Eliot says that Harvard is 
the only college from which a professor 
was ever taken for President of the 
United States, John Quincy Adams hav- 
ing held the chair of rhetoric and ora- 
tory in that institution. 

Congressman Cheadle of Indiana is 
described as wearing "a long and thin 
sandy beard and usually has gray clothes 
on. He has a kindly face, and in his 
general make-up and manners is a re- 
minder of a country preacher." 

Mrs. .Julia Ward Ho . ve is said to be 
one of those women whose audience al- 
ways seems to be her guests. She is 
gracious and kindly, but she always 
seems to stand a step higher than those 
whom she is a ddressing. 

ESTEEMED CONTEMPORARIES. 



New Yorkers Move on Con- 
gress in Solid Pluto- 
cratic Front, 



But Betters are Planking Their 

Cash on Chicago's 

Chance. 



Washi?igton, Jan. 11. — The New York 
contingent have taken the national capi- 
tal by storm today in behalf of the 
claim of Gotham for the World's fair. 

Seven of the largest rooms in the 
Arlington, and the saloon parlors to 
boot, are entered up to the delegation 
on the books of the room clerk. 

Grover Cleveland and ex-Mayor Abra- 
ham Hewitt are conspicuous by their 

absence, but the only Chauncey Depew 
is on the ground and back of him are 
Francis B. Thurber; Collector Joel B. 
Erhardt, George G. Haven, Edmund C. 
Stanton, I. C. Eastman, Henry Gold- 
berger, E. J. Horsman, H. G. Morquand, 
Frederick Mohr, Evan Thomas, John M. 
Bowers, John Bowers, John H. Graham, 
E. L. Merrifield, J. J. Little, Fred A. 
Kursheldt, John D. Crimmins, Evan 
Thomas, Gen. Daniel Butterfield, John 
H. Inman of the steamship line, Jesse 
Seligman, the thrice-fold millionaire, 
James W. Jappin, Franklin L. Gunther 
and Herman S. Mendelson. It is, on 
the whole, an influential and representa- 
tive delegation. 

The committee meets at noon, and it 
has been reserved for the redoubtable 
Depew to make the argument of the 
occasion. 

Betting at the sporting resorts, how- 
ever, is two to one in favor of Chicago 
capturing the fair. 

"THE ANGELUS" RETURNED- 



It Will be Shipped to France, But Will Re- 
turn to Ainericit. 

New Y'ork, Jan. 10. — It has been ru- 
mored of late that the famous painting 
"The Angelus" will be taken back to 
France in accordance with an agreement 
between the American Art association 
and the French authorities, who in- 
sisted upon a bond for its return within 
a specified time. It must leave here 
Jan. 15. 

It was nndestood that the painting 
was purchased by the American Art asso- 
ciation, and that it would remain per- 
manently in this country. When the 
picture was brought over under bond it 
was understood that it was to be ex- 
hibited in London and perhaps in Ber- 
lin, and that it would bo brought back 
afterward to remain permanently in this 
country It has been viewed here by at 
least 103.000 persons. The gentlemen 
who compose the American Art associ- 
ation deny the rumor that "The 
Angelus" was only brought over for ex- 
hibition purposes, and declare that ac- 
cording to their first statement the pic- 
ture will be brough back to this country 
after having been exhibited in London 
and other cities. 



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IBirminghamptoa Republican.] 

O. of the funny airs and graces 

In the speec-h and in the faces 
Of these dauKhters of the girls of long ago I 

Whtn a gentleman goes calling 

On a girl, she now say-, drawling. 
That a "mau" has tKsea to see her, dou't y»u 
know. 

'Ti8 a "man" who takes her riding. 

Or toboggun-iilldlng,— 
"And never," now declares the ancient beau, 

"Since Adam dolve and Eve span. 

Has the name of gentleman 
Been quite b o out of fashion, don't you know." 

A Thoroagligoing Aristocrat. 
Journal of Marie Bashkirtseff : As for 
me I am an aristocrat; I prefer a ruined 
gentleman to a rich bourgeois. I find a 
great«r charm in old satin, or in the gild- 
ing, blackened by time, of old-fashioned 
columns and ornaments, than in rich and 
tasteless furniture that obtrudes itself 
upon the eye. A true gentleman will 
not base his pride on having shining 
boots and well-fitting gloves. Not that 
one should be careless as to one's appear- 
ance, no; but between the carelessness 
of the nobleman and the carelessness of 
the plebeian there is such a difference! 

An Original Comparison. 

Journal of Marie Bashkirtseff: At 
noon today we set out for Pompeii; we 
are to make the journey in a carriage, as 
we pass through a beautiful country and 
can thus enjoy the view of Vesuvius and 
of the cities of Castellamara and Sor- 
rento. 

I overheard mamma speaking of mar- 
riage. 

"Woman is made to suffer," she said, 
"even if she has the best of husbands." 

"W^oman before marriage," I said, "is 
Pompeii before the eruption; and woman 
after marriage is Pompeii after the erup- 
tion." 

It may be that I am right I 



Senators for Washington. 
Helen.\, Mont., Jan. 11.— Messrs. San- 
ders and Power, the republican senators- 
elect, leave for Washington on this even- 
ing's express. Maginiiis and Clarke, the 
democratic senators, will depart on Mon- 
day, and in the course of a week the 
muddle will be transferred to the senate 
of the United States. The certificates 
of the democratic senators bear the sig 
natures of Governor Toole, those of the 
republicans the signature and seal of 
the secretary of state. The credentials 
of both are unconstitutional, and the 
senate committee on credentials will be 
called upon to bring order out of chaos. 
The prot>abilities are that none of the 
four men will be senators this trip. 

Sold the iSporti*. 

Chicago Tribune: An unknown man 
dropped a bank wrapper marked $1000 
on the bar in a down-town chop house 
last night. A crowd of sports, among 
them several high-class grafters, entered 
a moment later. 

"Whose got the roll?" the bartender 
was asked. 

For answer he pointed toward the 
stranger, who was making his way back 
to a table. 

"He skinned a tenner off a tat chunk 
to pay for his drink," explained the bar- 
tender, "and that dropped off with it," 
indie (ting the wrapper. 

"What did he drink?" asked one of the 
"grafters." 

"Beer," said the barkeeper. 

" 'Tisn't promising," observed another 
"grafter." 

"But we'll try it," said the first. "The 
stake's big enough to work for." 

It wasn't long before the expert had 
made the acquaintance of the stranger 
and introduced his friends. The cham- 
pagne began to flow at the expense of 
the jolly sports. The stranger's tab for 
his food was taken care of. Several 
times he started down in his pocket for 
his roll as if to buy something, but his 
entertainers wouldn't have it. 

"All you need do tonight is to drink 
and be happy," they said. "We're out 
for a good time and we've taken off the 
limit." 

The stranger did drink. His capacity 
was astonishing. His enjoyment was 
equally great, and he flowered the con- 
versation with one good story after an- 
other. Several of the more tender sports 
left in disgust. 

"He dies hard," whispered one of the 
sticklers. "But we'll bag him." 

They got him out of the place after a 
while and took him the round of other 
resorts. After he had enjoyed their 
hospitality until a late hour he pulled 
himself vigorously together and said: 

"Boys, I'm sorry I must leave you, for 
you've made me have a good time. I 
got up this morning thinking things had 
gone tough with me last year. I deter- 
mined to shift my system this year, and I 
thought I'd just start out rich New 
Y'ear's day. Wealth, you know, depends 
upon what other people think you're 
worth. Sol just iibbed up this roll 
with the last two bills I had — a one and 
a ten. It's worked pretty well thus far." 
And as he left he dropped the big 
tissue-paper wad around which the two 
bills had been wrapped. 



One of the most popular poems by 
Hon. George H. Boker, whose death was 
annouced, is his "Dirge for a Soldier" 
written for Gen. Phil Kearney: 

Close his eyes; his work is done! 

What to him is friend or foeman, 
Hiso of moon or set of sun. 
Hand of man, or kiss of woman? 
Lay him low, lay him low 
In the clover or the snow ! 
What cares he? Ho eannot know : 
Lay him low. 

As man may, he fought his flgbt. 

Proved his truth by his endeavor; 
Let him sleep in Solemn night. 
Sleep foi-ever and forever. 
Lay him low, lay him low 
In the clover or the snow! 
What cares be? tie cannot know: 
Lay him low 

Fold blm in bis country's stars, 

Rt>ll the drum and Are the volley I 
What to him are all our wars,— 
What, but death liemockiiig follyV 
Lay him low, lay him low 
In the clover or the snow I 
What cares he? Ue cannot know : 
Lay him low. 



H 



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OWN 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restauiants, 



—AND- 



TAKE NOTICE I 

We are agents 'or the celebrated 

Green Point China 

The Best In the World. 



Get our prices and vou will be per- 
fectly satisfied. 



19 West Superior Street. 




The above bright and bencTolent facr, is Dr. 
A. W. Acker, of England, discoverer of the 
celebrated Acker's English Remedy for Con- 
sumption and other popular preparations. Dr. 
.\cker practised in his younger days among the 
middle classes of London, and was the means of 
doing great good, but his health failed and ho 
foimd himself in the grasp of consumption, with 
a wife and child depending upon him for support. 
Wliile in this condition, he discovered the cele- 
brated English Remedy, saved his own life and 
has since saved tlie lives of thousands who were 
on the sure road to death. Any man or woman 
who feels a tickling In the throat, who coughs, 
especially in the morning, who raises or has a 
tight feeling across the chest, who ha.i sharp 
shooting pains through the lungs or difficulty in 
breathing, should realize that these are thi' first 
KI/mpfiiDis of consumption which, if neg-lt^-fed, 
are sure to result fatally. Dr. Acker's Triirlish 
Remedy has cured more than one thousaiui per- 
s-ms who -umiuestionably liad t-onsumption and 
whfi were given up by their frit- nds. It merits 
its jwipularity and is sold by reputable druggista 
in every city and town in America. You canH 
afford to be without it. 

For Sale in Duluth by Boyce & Totman 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY, 



MINNESOTA. 



First class in every way. 
Finest sample room In town 



eonnectloD 

Open November 



Newly refitted. 
Livery in 
WILl lAM GRANT, Prop. 



Db^LCWests 



NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 

Sppciflc for HTrtoria, Pizzinet-a.Fits, Neuralijia, Wako 
f^}llle>^<, Mental Dtpusslon. Softening of tlie iirain. re 
'Ultintf in in-uiuity and leading; to misery flerav and 
iie^iih. Pi-T^mature "(>I>I Age, Barrennes.-i. Loss ot* Power 
ineiihei sex. Involuntary Losses, and Sperniutoi-ihoea 
ause«l bv over^exertion of the liriUn, self-nbuse or 
uver-indnlgence. Eaih l>ox contains one month's treat- 
ment, tl a bos, or bIx for $.i. tent liv mail prepaiil. 
With envh oriler for .six boxes, \%ill sen«l pun-hascr 
>ruarantet» lo refund money if the treatment fails to 
cure. Uuaraiitevs iseueU anil genuiue sold only by 

Boyce & Totman. Phoenix Drug Store, and 
7 West Superior street, sole agents, Duluth, 
Minn. 



NEW HOTEL. 

THE 

MEmOPflLITAII, 

St. Paul, Minn., 

Cor. 4th and TVasiiinerton St«. 

On Cable Car Line. Rest Table in the Norta 
west. Kat es KI.OU and U p ward s . 

W. U. B&UMES. Manager. 

Mortgages Negotiated. 

6 AND 7 HER CENT. 



REALTy MIIPS! 



NO SUCH 



BARGIAINS 



Are to be found among 



uluth Real [state 





-WEST- 




-AND THE- 



EAST -:- END 



Lots in West Dulutti 



Lowest rates for all sizes and grades of 
security. Before borrowing elsewhere in- 
quire of 

N. J. UPHAM, 



Under First Nat. Bank. 
NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



FIRE i:n^sura:n^ce. 




GREAT ENGLISH REMEDY! 

Murray's Specific. 

■v r»io_Kr»*i- A gi:arantet cure for all ner 
"^ " i\ V0U8 disease such as Weak 
-" Moraorv, Loss Brain Power, 

Hysteria, Headache, Pain in the 
Back, Nervous Prostration, 
Leucorrhcea, Universal Lassi- 
tude, Seminal Weakness, Impo- 
tency and general loss of power 
of the Generative Organs:— in 
either sex, caused by Indlscre- 
(UlbnTaMoi^ tlon or over exertion, and which 
ultimately lead to Premature TraJ* 
0!d Age, Insanity and Consump- 
tion. 11.00 or a box or six boxes 
for 16.00. Sent by mail on re- 
ceipt of.prico. Full partlcalars 
In pamphlet, sent free to every 
applicant. We Uoarantee Six 
Boxes to cure any case. For 
every 15.00 order ret^lvcd, we 
send six boxes, with a written 
guarantee to refund the nioneyJJTrZjJjjJT 
If our Specific does not effect a cure. Address 
•llcotDmunications to the sole manufacturers 
TUB MUKKAT MBDICINBCO. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Sold Id Dalotb by Bl»« Wtrth. 



That are unheard of bargains. 




E -;- INVESTMENTS 



That cannot be excelled by any agent in 

the city. 



ADDRESS 






B03: J^ .Au, OIT^Z". 




Mortgage Sale. 



DEFAl'I.T HAVING BEEN MADE IN THE 
payineut of the sum of three hundred 
fifteen 5<>-liitl dollars (Sll.") o")), principal and 
interest, which is claimed to be due at the date 
of this notice upon a certain mortgage, duly 
executed and delivered by Francis X. Parent 
and Mary E. Parent, his vlfe, to Henry F. 
Davis, bearing date the seventh day of June, 
A. D. 1H89, and duly recorded in the office of 
the register of dee<ls in and ror the c-ounty of 
St. Louis, and state of Minnesota, on the 
eighth day of June A. D. ISMt, at 8 o'clock and 
10 minutes, A. M., in Book 41 of Mortgages, on 
page 67, and no action or proceetiing at law 
or otherwise having been instituted t<j recover 
the deljt si'cured by said Mortgage, or any part 
thereof : 

Now therefore, notice is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale coutaiui-d in said 
mortgage, and pursuant to the statut*? iu such 
case made and provided, the said Mortgage 
will be foreclosed, and the premises described 
in and covertnl l)y said mortgage, viz: 

Lots three (Hi and four (4i, of section eighteen 
(la), and lot (3), of section nineteen (191, all 
in townsliij> sixty-throe (t)3), north of range 
twelve U2(, west of the 4th principal meridian 
in St. Louis county, and state of Minne- 
sota, with the hereditaments and appur- 
ten;nicos, will bo sold iit public auction, 
to the highest liidder for cash, to pay said 
debt and interest, and the taxes. If any, 
on said premises, and twenty-five dollars 
attorney's fee. as stipuliitcd in and by 
8ai<i mortgage in case of foreclosure, and the 
disbursements allowed by law: which sale will 
be made by the sheriff if said St. Louis 
county, at tlie fifjnt d<X)r of the Court House, 
in the city of Duluth in said county and state, 
on the "^.Kh day of January. A. D. I«t0, at 10 
o'cUK-k a. m. of that day, subject to redemp- 
tion at any time within one year from the day 
of sale, as provi<led bv law. 

Dated December 13th, A. D. 1S89. 

Rknky F Davis, 

Mortgagee. 
R. N. Marble, 

Attorney. 

Dec. 14-21-28. Jan. 4-ll-lf^25. 



REAL ESTATE. 



SPECIAL LIST 



BARGAINS 

OFFERED BT 

C. E. RICHARDSON. 



Acreage on the hill, just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half interest in this forty 
acres can be had for $62,000 

80 Acres at West End, near Brook- 
dale Division 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior 1 60 

I Acres in the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 

The best bargain offered now Is stock in the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate ot profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Duluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 



C. E. RICHARDSON, 

326 West Superior Street. 



WEST DULUTH! 



LAKE & AUSTIN'S 



SPECIAL LIST. 



Good pair on Fourth avenue, SI400. 
if taken soon. 

Dwellings near Car works and Iron 
Bay works for rent cheap. 

Good house and lot in Fifth division, 
$1200. 

Two lots on Grand (paved part), 
$4000. 

Good pair on Central (paved part), 
$5500. 

Best lots in Clinton and Carlton 
Place, $300. 

A good lot in Hunters Grassy Point 
First division, $300. 

A triple corner on Main street and 
First avenue, $2400. 

If you will sell your property at a 
reasonable figure, pleast call, or write 
us about it immediately. 

Correspondence solicited, maps and 
any information cheerfully furnished. 
Loans and insurance carefully and 
promptly attended to. 

MACFARLANE & AUSTIN, 

West Dulut^> ' 



COFFIIi & WAItllEil, 

ao FAKGUSSON BLtXJK. 

80 Acres, section 9-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 33-49-15. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-50- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15. 

All below the market. 



COFFIN &. WARNER. 

W. C. SHERWOOD & CO.. 

REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVE GENUINE BARGAINS IN 

LOTS ^ BLOCKS, 

In dlffei parts of the city and 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 



All we ask is for p. rtiostoexamlneourllst and 

compare them flth other prices liefore 

buying. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood & Co., 



J. D. & R. 0. RAY, 

REAL ESTATE. 

ROOM "B," - HUNTER BLOCK. 



B. C. GKIDLEV. J. C. MISHLRB 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 

Real Estate Brokers 

Room 36, Exchange Building-. 
List your property with us at i»hat it is worth 
and we will sell it. We invite everybody to 
call in and see us, and solicit ojrrespondence 



lUIONEY TO LOAN IN ALL 
'''' sums on Duluth Rjal 
Estate at 6 I -2,. 7 and 8 per 
cent. No delay. 

JULIUS D. HOV»'ARD, 
Room 3, - - Mil'er Block. 



Great French remedy. Dii. LeDcc's pkk- 
lODiCAL riLi.s, from Paris, France, act only on 
the vrenorative organs in females and posi- 
tively cures suppre^:s!onof menses (from what- 
ever causei, and ali periodical troubles pecu- 
liar to women. A safe, reliable remedy, war- 
ranted to excite menstruation or money re- 
funded. Should not be used during pregnancy. 
The large proi«)rtion of the ills to which ladies 
are subject is the direct result of a disordered 
and Irregular menstruation. Hobt. Stevenson 
&Co., Chicago, 111., H. Btjswarth & Co., Mil- 
waukee, Wholesale Agts. Tlio genuine only 
supplied by Boyce & Totman, Sole Agts.. Du- 
luth. 



dp pn B«st Set 
q> O . C U "of Teeth. 

CULLUM, 

Painless Dentist. 

Room 1-7, 406 West Superior Street, 
Fargiisson Block. • Duluth 




1 



ij.'.i;U ' tj ftiM ' i. p .vJ 




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^ 



V 



,"V 




■'.I 




1 



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4 

- 

EVEXIN(i UERALD. 

ELIOT LORD, Publlshar. 

PRICE, THREE CENTS— SulMcrlptlon RaU«: 

Dally, by mall, per year 'Z'99 

Dally, by mall, per three months 2.00 

Dally, by mail, per one mouth 76 

IN THE CITT. 

Dally, by carrier, per week '8 

Entered at the poetoffice at Duluth. Minn., as 
second-class mall matter. 

PBThe Washington office of The Herald Is 
at ll:« New York avenue, N. W., where the 
paper is kopt on Ble and where The Herald 
corrt>sp<jiideut will welcome visitors from the 
Northwest. 



UUIAJTU EVUairKTG HERALD: JAXTJARY 11 1890 



The Herald has closed arrangements 
for the most complete telegraphic serv- 
ice of any newspaper in the Northwest 
outside of the Twin cities and will from 
this time on give full reports of all the 
latest news of the country, besides cov- 
ering the local field as efficiently &s pos- 
sible. Now is the time to subscribe. 
Apply to business office for sample 
copies. 

What the hitch is in the opening of a 
public librarj- here is plainly stated in 
another column. The recognition of the 
fact that the city is divided into wards 
appears to be of more importance to the 
council than th' service of a good work- 
ing committee, nd the benefit to the 
whole jsity by t e opening of a public 
librarj-. We h 'pe the time wilL, come 
some day w-hen the prime question asked 
about a public servant is whether he is 
a competent man for his place, and not 
from what ward he hails. 



The Herald is disposed to live on terms 
of peace and good-will with all creation, 
but the vagaries of the city gas this 
month are beginning to wear on its 
temper. The meter keeps on running 
steadily and certainly does not lose a 
foot in the race, but the gas has a bad 
attack of the grip and is getting paler 
every day. It is subject to fits too. and 
is now and then snuffed out entirely. 
It is a bonanza 'or the lamp and oil men, 
but rough on consumers. We are bidden 
to hope for a change for the better when 
the new works are made ready to run, 
but as the Russian peasant says, the 
Czar is near and heaven is far off. If 
the company would only shift the "regu- 
larity of pressure" behind its monthly 
bill to its mains, consumers never would 
complain. Why not try it one month 
for a change? 



publicans, to carry an 
form bill in New York, 
adopted in our own state, 
under a cloud. 



effective ballot re- 
like to the one 
The Sun is 



Even the most steady old conse* , 

^6ei 
coach horse in England has not ■. , 

able to keep out of the clutch of tu 
grip. The London Times has it, and 
discourses thereon with ponderous good 
sense as follows: "There is much to be 
said in favor of the common belief that 
all catarrhal maladies are liable to be 
produced, or at least to be aggravated, 
by the effect of cold on the surface of 
the body. This knowledge points to the 
use of plenty of underclothing, which 
affords warmth without undue weight, 
as well as to the desirableness of breath- 
ing through the nostrils, so that the air 
may be warmed and filtered in their 
winding passages before it is suffered to 
enter the chest. Many an old gentle- 
man has contracted his last bronchitis 
from standing at a street corner, in in- 
clement weather, to talk and laugh with 
a friend, thus filling his lunt^p with 
volumes of cold and dirty air, drawn 
directly through the widely-opened 
mouth into the respiratory passages." 
Or as we would say in the breezy North 
west, wear heavy flannels and keep your 
mouth shut on the streets. So the grip 
will slip. 



THE BELLS OF NOTRE DAME. 



[Chlcag-o News.] 

What thontrli the radiant thoroughfare 

Teems with a noisy tbronir? 
What thougii men bandy everywhere 

The ribald Jests and songV 
Over the dlu of oaths and cries 

Broodfth a wondrous calm. 
And mid that solemn stillness rise 

The bells of Notre Dame, 



■UNCLE TOMS CABIN. 



It Is singular with what perennial tenacity 
"Uncle Toms Cabin" clings to the boards. The 
heralding of that ancient drama always calls 
up sarcastic allusions from everybody, espe- 
ciailr the chronic theater-goer, who swears he 
wouldn't go across the street to see It. Next 
to a minstrel show, however, Cncie Tom 
always draws a full house. Topsy, with her 
ungainly capers: Marks, with his donkey; 
Aunt Ophelia, with her homllys on the "shif- 
less;" the cruel Legree, the angelic Eva, ap- 
peal to the audience as effectively as ever, and 
drew out the usual amount of laughter and 
tears, just the same as twenty years ago, and 
no doubt It will be just the same twenty years 
hence. Th© specialty performances of the 
company here last night are very fair. 
Mabel Arlington as Eva and Nettie Hamer 
as Topsy are perhaps worthy of notioo. 



"Heed not. dear Lord," they seem to say, 

"Thv weak and erring child; 
And thou, t» gentle mother, pray 

That God bo recomilixl; 
^ on mankind, O Christ, our King, 



'"poi 'f out thy precious balm" 
•TiaVh. '• ^^^^ plead and thus they sing. 
Those L ''l«"f ^otn Dame. 

And so, tneth.''»^„«- !';«'• .*'^,"^'°» •I"''" 
T., u^n th„.i. in*f*"f «arth. 



<jf(cery of the town 



To ken the th 
Heeds not the m ^ „,irth 

Or cries of riha. ^ ^lll^'^ 
For ever souiidcth i.^ |2_ 

A peullenlial iisaln . »,„ . . 
■Tls thy angelic voice H •* "ears. 

O bells oi Notre Dame! 

Plead on. O bells. Ojat thy sw.*** voloo 

May still forever be 
An intercessl >u to rejoice 

Benign divinity; 
And that thy tuneful grace may fall 

Like dew, a quickening balm 
Di-iou the arid hearts of all — 

O bells of Notre IJamel 



NEWS AS IT FLIES. 

The 



SEEN AND HEARD. 



The complete and forcible presenta- 
tion by Ser.ator Davis of the call for the 
prompt completion of the work at the 
Sault cannot fail to make a just impress 
on congress. We have already the as- 
surance that the national legislature is 
awakening to the imperative need of an 
adequate and early appropriation to 
carry through this work of such mo- 
mentous importance to the transconti- 
nental commerce of the North. It is 
noted that provision for the work in its 
entirety is an exception to the customary 
practice, but it is also recognized that 
the case is one that fully justifies the I 
exception. The commercial bodies of 
the North and the states chiefly con- 
cerned in the prosecution of work at the 
Sault have reason to congratulate them- 
selves on the presence at the national 
capital of an advocate so well equipped 
and justly influential as the senior sena- 
tor from Minnesota. 



The publication in The Herald today 
after the lapse of twenty-five years of 
the full official report of the capture of 
Jefferson Davis by Col. Pritchard, makes 
a notable addition to the literature of 
the war for the Union, and the interest 
of the story is heightened by the recent 
death of its chief figure. Already we 
are slow to realize to what depth the 
loyal feeling of the time was stirred, and 
what importance was attached to the 
capture of the head of the great rebel- 
lion. The report will now be read coolly 
as a exparte contribution to history, and 
not as a dispatch detailing the closing 
episode of the most extraordinary strug- 
gle that ever convulsed a nation. But 
the animated drawing and vivid coloring 
of this picture of the closing scene of the 
rebellion will not fail to make its impress 
even now when the passions of the day 
have subsided and the actors have left 
the stage to return no more. 



In connection with the letter of Col. Pritch- 
ard, wbU'h is published today, a curious cir- 
cumstance Is noted. Shortly aft-T the book 
"Michigan In the War" was published, in which 
the letter was partly given, the publishing 
house was consumed by fire and the books and 
plates destroyed. A request for a copy came 
In from the governor of a Southern state, and 
the following reply was sent: "There are no 
copies of book left. Place has been destroyed 
by hre. One hundred copies of book were 
ordered by Jefferson Davis and shipped day 
before Are. Perhaps he can supply you with 
copy." 

* * * 
"The investments of British gold in this 
country for the past year have been enor" 
muus," said a Duluth financier, "but nobody 
need have any fear that the English are buy- 
ing out the country, for, compared with the 
total business valuation of the United States, 
the sum invested by the 'blarsted' Britisher is 
small Indeed. But intrinsically the sum in- 
vested is stupendous. The amount probably 
reaches i200.ux),U(Xi, which Is only a Uttlo over 
the total wealth of the Vanderbllts, Ooulds or 
Astors. 

* * * 
"The first of these late English Investments 
was made two years ago, when a syndicate 
negotiated for the purchase of breweries in 
New York and New Jersey. Although the 
enterprise was capitalized at W.aOO.OOO, yet the 
subscriptions to stock In London amounted to 
*:i5,ii(X),CioO. Then another English concern, 
called the United States Brewing company, 
was formed in London, and with $o,t)00,0(Xi 
capital purchased othnr American breweries. 
After the success of these ventures gold fairly 
flowed to this country for Investment. Why. 
Messrs. Untermeycr. the New York agents of 
the first syndicates, have placed Jia.OOi^OOO of 
English monej In this cx)untry. and they have 
deals on hand that approximate many millions 
more. In eighteen months 118,000,000 has been 
invested in New York alone. 
* * * 
"These English syndicates are made up, not 
of canitalists, but from smiUI Investors. Tlie 
stocks to the concerns are listed in the London 
Stock Exchange. ;he rules of which body are 
so stringent, that a complete statement of 
every recourse and liability is necessary be- 
fore the enlistment can be made. This year 
will see more English money lavested in 
American industries than In 1»><9. While 
«axi.O<J().lX)tJ has been invested In 
America In the last two years, over 
*HOO,UOO,000 has been subscribed towards enter- 
prises in other countries, $100,000,000 going to 
Argentine Kepublic alone. Within the past 
four months companies with an aggregate 
capital of «10(i,000,000 have been formed to in- 
vest in America. The Law Debenture com- 
pany, formed for buying mortgages and other 
securities, has a capital of 115,000,000. The 
largest sum represented In any single Industry 
Is in the breweries, the amount approximat- 
ing *e6,ooo,ooo." 



J. A. McKenzie: The real estate 
market is quiet but firm. It is a very 
difficult matter to buy good property. 

Dr. S. C. McCormick: I'm glad to see 
the governor has appointed such a man 
as Dr. J. F. Fulton to represent the 
medical profession on the board of in- 
sane asylum trustees. I know Dr. 
Fulton to be a scientific, reliable, 
thoughtful practitioner. There couldn't 
have been a better man named. 

Judge Spencer: I could find no place 
in the West with the prospects of Du- 
luth. It is the coming commercial cen- 
ter of the West, and is at present the 
liveliest and busiest city in this country. 

Fire Chief Hafey: A need of the fire 
department is an engine house on Su- 
perior street. It is hard work to reach 
a tire from the present quarters on a 
stormy day, when a delay of a few min- 
utes might put the conflagration beyond 
our control. 

Harris Bros: There is considerable 
inquiry for real estate, but no great 
amount of sales. This is a very hopeful 
sign. 

A real estate man: There are several 
big unconaummated deals in the vicin- 
ity of West Duluth, which, however, 
will soon be completed. If you look up 
the real estate transfers in The Herald 
for the past six months you will find 
that a great amount of property in 49-15 
has changed hands. They are surveying 
a new route for the Duluth & Winni- 
peg's Duluth entrance. 



«g»»goBgfleas^g<iee<!ge<!ea<»9a»jfle 



ROBERT G. McDowell, 

327 WEST SUPERIOR ST., 

Ground Floor, Opposite Hotel St Louis. 



SUPERIOR-:- ACRES! 



A Woiuaa With a Check- Book. 

In a down town banker's office yester- 
day I beard an account of what befell a 
young New York millionaire, says a 
writer in The Star, who last June mar 
ried one of the belles of the season. The 
gentleman was a believer in the capacity 
of women to learn something about 
business. In pursuance of this objecthe I 
opened an account for his wife with a I 
banking firm acd supplied her with a 
check-book, adding thereto the most 
careful instructions about the use of 
that delightful utensil. Madam took it 
all in gravely, and announced that she 
understood perfectly. In about a week 
the husband was astonished by a notice 
from the banker that his wife's account 
was overdrawn. As he had placed a 
generous balance to her credit he was 
somewhat annoyed. On reaching his 
home he at once asked madam how it 
happened that her account was over- 
drawn. "Why, no, dear, it isn't," was 
the ingenious response. "I haven't used 
half the checks in my book yet, and I've 
bought lots of things, too." 

The Mau Who Orups His Money. 

A man with a carpet-bag and six days' 
growth of beard dropped a coin in pay- 
ing his fare on a Seventh avenue ear in 
Brooklyn. After getting down on his 
hands and knees with difficulty and 
clawing around among the feet of the 
passengers, he said: ^ 

"I don't care a durn for the money, but 
no grindin' monopoly sha'n't get it, you 
bet." 



-:- 500 ACRES OF LAND -:- 



With 800,000 feet of Pine, for $7 per acre; Omaha 

road runs through it. One-half cash, 

balance I and 2 years. 



In nothing is the astonishing advance 
in mechanical art to keep pace with the 
swift moving demands of the day more 
strikingly apparent than in the perfec- 
tion of the lever that moves the world. 
If present e.^pectations are realized the 
great quadruple press which Messrs. 
Hoe &, Co. have undertaken to build for 
The Xew York Herald, will be the fastest 
printing press in the world. The speed 
and capacity of this press is estimated at 
90,000 four or six-page papers per hour, 
which is at the rate of 1500 copies per 
minute, or at the rate of twenty-five per 
second, 70,000 eight-page papers per 
hour, 46,000 t«n or twelve-page papers, 
36,000 sixteen-page papers, or 24,000 
twenty-four-page papers per hour. All 
these papers will be delivered from the 
machine complete — cut, pasted, and 
folded. From this height of improve- 
ment the next step is to build a press 
that will deliver papers to subscribers as 
fast as turned oflf. We want one of that 
kind. 



THE STATE EDITORS. 

Lanesboro Journal: 



Jack- 
low it 
point 
Itre- 



The New York Sun dips its pen in 
gall almost every day, but it rarely 
stoops to folly. In its text on St. 
son's day, however, it shows how 
can bend on occasion to score a 
for supposed political advantage. 
marks with poorly counterfeited 
warmth: "If the old hero could come to 
life today and see democrats engaged in 
an attempt to deprive unlettered free- 
men of the right to vote, how his eyes 
would flame, and with what vigor he 
would lift his cane and lay it about him 
on the numskulls and snobs who are be- 
traying his principles and trying to 
narrow the bonds of democracy!" Now 
this is Lot a reference to the peculiar 
political expedients of the South, as ordi- 
nary people would suppose, but to the 
eflfort made by public-spirited democrats 



O. H. Lucken of 
Crookston, who is prominently men- 
tioned as collector of internal revenue 
of this state, is a tried republican and in 
every way fitted for the position. 

Owatonna Journal: There is a certain 
class of papers in the North which con- 
stantly speak of Jeff Davis as "ex-Presi- 
dent Davis," and of another prominent 
man as "one R. B. Hayes." These are 
the "howling" patriots. 

The Morrison County Democrat, at 
Little Falls, has been sold out by Cyrus 
D. Auyer to Charles F. Beugnot. Editor 
Auyer, who bears the reputation of 
being the laziest man in Minnesota, will 
get a move on him and go to the state of 
Washington, where he will start another 
paper where there is not much work to 
be done. 

Winona Republican: What is wanted 
just now, and first of all, so far as Min- 
nesota IS concerned, is the passage of 
Mr. Lind's bill, either as it was intro- 
duced, or so amended as to provide for 
two separate districts instead of one. 
This is the point to which we would, 
with all due respect, invite the attention 
of Minuesota's senators at Washington. 
The interests of the Northwest gener- 
ally may be taken up with equal zeal 
and determination provided they in- 
volve no conflict with those of our own 
people. 

Lake City Republican: Harrison's 
choice of Windom for sec-etary of the 
treasury has been vindicated. He is 
proving himself full as able as John 
Sherman or Salmon P. Chase. His re- 
port was a masterly exposition of our 
finances. Windom is a man of brains, 
and Minnesota should be proud of him. 



He clawed around some more and then 
yelled: 

"Come on, conductor, and help me find 
this money. It's likely a two-dollar- 
and-a-half gold piece, but I want it, if it 
was nothin' but a ten-cent piece." 

The feilow rolled around against people, 
ruining two or three dresses, trod on sev- 
eral corns and made a nuisance of him- 
self generally. 

"Don't mind me," he said to a lady 
who shrank away from him. "I ain't 
doin' this for the mere money, but I'll 
be hanged if these grindin' capitalists 
shall get any of my cash that they don't 
earn." 

The conductor lifted a section or two 
of the fl'jor, carried half-a-dozen people 
past their stopping place, failed to see 
several persons who wished to get aboard 
— and all on account of a boor who 
dropped a penny. 



EXCUSED HIMSELF. 



Au 



If you want your property sold quick 
list it with 

D. H. SxEVErisoN & Co.. 

43 Exchange building. 

"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Room D, Hunter 
block. 



In order to give everybody a chance 
to participate in the benefits of ourgreat 
holiday reduction sale, I have decided 
to continue it for the balance of this 
month. Don't miss the opportunity to 
get reliable goods at away-down prices. 
Sale closes positively Friday, Jan. 31. 
Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 

A house of ten rooms, good cistern, 
lot 50x1.50 at a great bargain, onlv 83000. 
Must be sold this week. 

D. H. Stevenson & Co., 

43 Exchange building. 

Two lots on Banks avenue West Su 
perior for sale cheap. J. A. B.ogg.s. 

Does Kxperieuce Count? 

It does, in every line of business, and 
especially in compounding and preparing 
medicines. This is illustrated in the 
great superiority of Hood's Sarsaparilla 
over other preparations, as shown Oy the 
remarkable cures it has accomplished. 

The head of the firm of C. I. Hood & 
Co. 18 a thoroughly competent and ex- 
perienced pharmacist, having devoted 
his whole life to the study and actual 
preparation of medicines. He is also a 
member of the Massachusetts and Am 
erican Pharmaceutical associations, and 
continues actively devoted to supervis- 
ing the preparation of and managing 
the business connected with Hood's 
Sarsaparilla. 

Hence the superiority and peculiar 
merit of Hood's Sarsaparilla is built 
upon the most substantial foundation. 
In Its preparation there is represented 
all the knowledge which modern research 
in medical science has developed, com- 
bined with long experience, brain-work 
and experiment. It is only necessary to 
give this medicine a fair trial to realize 
its great curative value. 

A big snap on Bench street. Lot on the 
upper side of Bench street. A beautiful 
site for a house, only 81700. Easy terms 
D. H. Stevenson & Co., 
43 Exchange building. 



A. J. sutler DueKn't Want to Serve 
KntertnluiDg Letter. 

Among the petit jurors names drawn 
for service at this term of the district 
court was A. J. Miller. Distance makes 
no difference to Sheriff Sharvy and when 
he found where Mr. Miller was he sent 
him a subpwna and a copy cf The Her- 
ald notifying him of his selection. Mr. 
Millers reply was as follows: 

Valuendar am Rhine, / 
Dec. 20, 1880. \ 
Paul Sharvy: -I see by the paper that 
I am expected to serve as petit juror, 
but as I cannot now get matters in shape 
in time to start and reach your city by 
Jan. 6, I hope you will excuse me and 
make the necessary excuses to the court. 
However, I do not accept service by 
publication and await your arrival here 
to serve a summons, and if you will let 
me know when you are coming I will 
me-t you at the landing, and save the 
county the expense of sending you 'way 
into the interior to hunt me up. 

I often think of and pity you— plod- 
ding along in that land where there is 
no rest. Here everybody takes it easy; 
the wealthy sit around all day, drink 
and smoke; the poorer classes cannot 
get much for their work, and conse- 
quently don't work. The only people 
here who have hard work are the 
soldiers. They have to serve three years 
without pay, with black coffee and no 
butter. These poor fellows have to drill 
nearly all the time, and the country is 
full of them. I live nearly opposite 
Coblentz, which has a population of 
about .30,000 and has 8000 soldiers. Every 
town of any importance has a large body 
of soldiers. 

We have enjoyed our visit very much. 
I have a comfortable house; the children 
have good teachers, and my wife and I 
take short trip, sometimes staying away 
weeks. We have been up and down the 
Rhine a half-a-dozen times. 

A. J. Miller. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 



$583.3.3 

Will handle one of Thomas & Hendrick's 
5 acre lots on the hill. A rare bargain. 
L. J. Taussig, 

Phoenix block. 



J. A. Boggs offers a 
parties interested in 
Call and see him. 



good bargain to 
the West End. 



The Weather Hulletln. 

Meteorologlciil report received at 
Minn.. 8 a. m. Jan. 11, 1880. 



Duluth 



PL.\CB8. 



Duluth 

Pt. Arthur. 
Winnipeg .. 
St. Vin.-cnt 
Q'Apiwlle.. 
ABsinib'no . 

Helena. 

Huron.Uak 
St. Paul . .. 
La Crosse... 
Blstnarck. . . 
Moorhead .. 



Bar. 



Ther 



29.80 is 
:».i)4 10 
3().2«l— 14 

an. 18-12 

39.46-12 



:W.28| 

ai.m 

39.741 

*.12l 
29.96 



2H 

33 

-2 

4 

i 



Wind 



E 
N 

N 
N 
Calm 

jiw 

NW 

N 

NW 

NW 

N 



Ualn 



.04 
.08 
T. 

.18 



Weather 



.02 
.04 
.04 
.66 
.66 
.08 



Snow 

Snow 

P't Cloudy 

Cloudy 

P't cloudy 

Cloudy "" 

Snow 

Snow 

Snow 

Snow 

Cloudy 



Pecu I iar 

Peculiar In combination, proportion, and 
preparation of Ingredients, Hood's Sarsapa^ 
rilla possesses the curative value of the best 
known reme- |J-^-^ J»-» dies of the 
vegetable nOOa Sklngdom. 
Peculiar In Us strength and economy, Hood's 
Sarsaparilla Is the only mediclue of which can 
truly be said, " One Hundred Doses One Dol- 
lar." Peculiar In Its medicinal merits, Hood's 
Sarsaparilla accomplishes cures hitherto un- 

t"oSSarsapariIla^?^e'u 

the title of " The greatest blood purifier ever 
discovered." Peculiar In Its "good name 
at home,"— there Is more of Hood's Sarsa- 
parilla sold in Lowell than of all other 
blood purifiers. Peculiar in Us phenomen.al 
record "f Q^_,,|; _ ..salesabroad 
no other r^ ecu liar preparation 
ever attained so rapidly nor held so 
steadfastly the confidence of all classes 
of people. Peculiar In the brain-work which 
it represents. Hood's Sarsaparilla com- 
bines all the knowledge which modem 
research—- |x^«|f In medical 
science has lO I ISCI I developed, 
with many years practical experience in 
preparing medicines. Be sure to get only 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

Sold by all druggists. jBI;8lifor jl5. Prepared only 
by C. I. IIOOD & CO., Apothecaries. Lowell, Mass. 

lOO Doses One Dollar 



NOTIC[TO STEAM PITTEfiS 



Sealed proposals will be recehed until 2 
o clock p. ra , January 3)th, 1890. by 10. K Jeffer- 
son, chairman ot coniniitU'e on c< urt house 
and county jail, for the steam-heati ;ig appara- 
tus in the new county jail, in accor lance with 
plans and speclflcatlous drawn bj (> G Tra- 
phagen, architect, on file at the office of the 
county auditor. 

Each proposal must be accompailed with a 
certified check for two hundred do lars, to bo 
forfeited to St. Louis County in the e\ent that 
the proposal which said cheek at com anics 
shall be accepted by the county eonii nissiouers, 
ami that the person making the prtposal shall 
tail to comply with its terms. 

Address all proposals to E.R. Ji^fferson, in 
care of county audllor, Duluth, Minn 

ior further information apply lo John F. 
i5c;hlenues, superintendent, Duluth, Minn. 

ihe coniBuissioners reservothe riglitto reject 
any and all proposals. 

Dec U-lH-2l-34-28.Ta n 1-4-X-11-15-18-22. 

CHICHESTER'S ENGLISH 

PENNYROYAL PILLS 

■- STTk "ED cross diamond biiano. 
i/ fSrC-A Kiire an<! iiwaT^ ri-ii»hie. La Hen, 

j\ If^Mt. ^"^ UruKk'ist ror Diamond Srar, d. tn 
■ '^ red. rai-lallic twit-s. scaled witli bluei 

ribboD. Take no othpr. Allpliu' 
In paiilebnar.i boiee, pick wrapper i. are 
dancrrona caunterfelta. Sen. , 4c. 
(«lam|,«) for |iarticiilar», tc«ui lODiall and 
Keller for Ladles," in Utttr by r«t>ra 
Mall. Aame PaptrT ">•—«•■ 

Cklcheater Cheai'l Co., ladhoa 84 , ■ *■»- j ffc 



WANTED — (',„„,„.,,.„, pi I , .reueral 
housework, 141)11 Ueiicli street . '^"•"'•'^'" 



WANTED- Machinists 
hands 



Fellows 



at once, 
building. 



Two good lathe 
Inquire room I, Odd 



A\^^?.T.!'iN~r «^'''' *""■ srenoral house work; 



tT>fiOtn^^1^-***^,"P«''««« in advance. 
*r^-'^-^ allowed each monlli. Steady em- 

&Ztifl ','!""'■ "■•/'•■'vellng. No sSli^mw 
rostlr ^',1 ?""".«; "t"'^ making collections. Nb 



IKjstal c.irds. Address with 
00., Piqua, Ohio. 



stamp, liafer & 




IIDAVIDJ M. 

^SSO {Houghton, l: 



DFOl=?D,n 



S.7MicltT 



WANTED-At the Womaus Euiplovment 
Bureau, :ill superior street east two 
second girls and a dozen girls for general 
house work Emi-loymout obuilued free of 
Cost. Mrs. A. D. Ayers. 



For >iale, 

iT^OH SALE— A heavy 
! at A. W. Eiler'saH 



working team cheap 
Lake avenue south. 



1 .'lOK SALE— My residence with 6u or 100 feet 
J. {U^ilofcasttecond sircet. Terms to suit 
purchaser. K. A. Gilbert, •<! Hoard of Trade 



IT^OU. bALL— At a baigain, uiue-roomed 
? house wilh lot X,xlH). Price tJicfi; *,yjo 
cash, balance ou terms to suit purcha-er. For 
1 urtuer particulars call at room 211, Pastoret- 
.-teuson building. 



0.=:: 



en' 



IDEALEU in! 



Lake Superiof Gold, Iron and Copp;r Ms 

Michigan Gold Company's Stock a Siecialty. 

"The richest mines in the world." 

CORKK,SPONnENCE SOLICITED. 



IT^OK SALE— House and lot, 8IAIU; iioo down 
J^ the I'cmaiuuer ou U-rms satisfactory to 
tuc piirchaser. This is a genuine bargain. 
Koom »'il, Pasloret-slensou building 



HEAVV HUKSES l\)R SALE-lo head of 
heavy horses, raised at Lake Park, cm 
me Northern Pacillc - " ■ '«■."« 



6 PER CENTI 



Any kind or description of ledger, 
^""'■nal or record book can be made you 
in conjunction with public-spirited re-l^^ The Herald bindery and job rooms. 



Oneota. 

We have a large and choice list of 
Oneota property which is a bargain if 
taken at once. 

MeNDE.\HALI., & HOOPES. 
Money to Loan. 

Mendenhall A Hooi^es have money to 
loan in amounts to suit the borrower, at 
the lowest rate of interest. 



, \'" '■a'fi column Indicates trace. One (1) 
incbof rain or melted snow equals ten (10) in- 
clit-s of snowlall. Minus*-) In temperature 
twiumn indicates below zero. 

W. H. Fallon, 

Sergeant Signal Corps 

Ddlcth, Jan. 11.— Local forecast for 
twenty-four hours, ending 10 a. m. Jan. 
11: Decidedly colder weatlier and 
snow. 

Wa.shingto.v, Jan. 10.~ Forecast for 
ttcenty-four hours, ending s a. in. to- 
morrow: For Minne.tota, North and 
South Dakota— Light snow, northerly 
winds, colder. 



We have at command unlimited 
amounts of money to lend promptly 
at 6 percent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



WHITE BEAVER'S^ 

(OyGH@AE 

HEALS DISEASED LUNGS. DRUGGIST! SELL IT 

T. H. SPEMCE, LA CROSSE, WIS. 



road, lor sale by C. W 
Can oe seeu at Howurii barn, ou the 
' Minnesota point. ttesiUeuc-e, iti 



Harvey 

lake shoif. 

West Fourth street. 



Lost, 

gold-link cuff button in 
rings. Lost in Superior 

, ' >*ib leceive reward bv 

leaving itie same at my office. Uobert G . Me- 

uptiioi street. 



LOST— Part of a _ 
shape of three 
Duluth. Finder 
g lUe sat 
Doweli, .Jsri West 



IjlOR HENT 
} steam, et< 
Heralu olhce. 



tar K«ut. 

-Di.8irable room; 
.; private family. 



bath, gas. 
Address S., 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 15 FARGUSSON BLDCK. 



W'^?.?'^P~Af"''"'**^'^ ''«"«» for ">e win 
tei. L.J. Taussig, No. y PboeuU block 



Financial. 

lure, pianos, horses 



loans money in any amount on furni- 



KOOM 10, 



HUGO & CO., 

- Metropolitan Block. 

TELEPHONE 242. 



I have a great demand for property. 
List your property with me for quick 

J. A. BooG.s, 
35 Fargusson building. 



sales. 



VegetableH. Vegetables. 

All kind of vegetables carried in 
stock; potatoes, parsnips, rutabagas, 
beets, carrots and onions by Clark A 
Metz. 



Loans Hade on Onimproved Propertj. 



OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned, 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Clean id. 

MRS. HUNTER,~io6 Second Si. East. 



WANTS, fOB SALE, ETC 



..i<^,7«i .. . "'*** wagons without re- 

moval Irom owners possessiob ; also on ware^ 
bouse leceipis. bank slocks, and any p "ope,^ 
"^ioX^Ux'^T^ disc-ountei:' partia^^pai^iiients 
^.T, .^.^ ^"1 *'*'"'■ "^^^ time grauicd lor pay- 
wl^^;:!"*^*^,*-"^*^^ money on baud and furnished 
immediately alter security is appiovcxl. Wm. 
Morkau, Manager, Koom 1;.', Fargusson block. 
Uuluth, Minn. ' 



IF YOU WISH TO SELL OK IHV DILCTH 
or Superior bank stoc-k, cxirpoi-atiou or in- 
ve.«tment securities, call ou or address D. .Mur- 
phin, broker, H llanuing bl«k, Duluth, Minn 



ONE CENT A WORD IN ADVANCE. 



Dancing and Deportment. 

Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No. 113 
West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents', 
Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 

The Herald bindery has the beet 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



BUILDINQ LOANS A SPECIALTY. 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY M0RTQAQE8 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT. 



CUIiUt&PmilDLE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 803 

Ouluth National Bank Building. 



.i.^^^^''"^'^'™*'",'^* "'"^«'' this head reo-ivedat 

1°^ ^7^9,"''"? places, besides the business of- 
fice of 1 he Herald : 

Kndiou Pharmacy, 12T Tenth aven le east. 

Moyoe & Totman, corner Fourth 
and Superior street west. 

J. W. NelM>n, No. 1801, corner Klgiteonth 
avenue west and Superior street. 

D*l" fu •"**""• ^^^^^ clerk Phillips hot< i. West 



avenue 



Help Wanted. 

WANTED— A oook for a small faml y. 
quire, 330 Kaat Second street. 



iVilSCELLANEOUS. 

^ H. WILSON, ATTOKNEY AND COUN- 

^^ , scllor at Law. WiU practice in State 
anil United Mates Courts. AU business given 
prompt attention. 44 Fargusson Block. Duluth. 
.Minn. ^ 

pLASTEHlNU. ~~ 

H. T. DINHAM. 

All kinds 
.itly 
tor block. 




/ 



l> 




/. 




of plastering done. Jobbing 
promptly attended to. GlHce. room D. Huri: 



In 



WANTED— A llrst-class German nnise girl 
Address Kooui 2(K . First National bank. 

I WISH to employ a few ladles on saarv to 
take charge of ray business at their homes 
Light, very fascinating and healthful. WagcK 
»10 per week. Keference given. Gooditayfoi 
p^rttlme. Address with stamp. Mrs. tfarion 
Walker, Louisville. Ky. 



VrBS. J. 8. DINWOODIE. 

reacher of Piano Forte, Voice and Sight Slnir- 
Ing. Chorus and Choir Conductor. 

Music roiims at J. J. Wigging's, 16 East Su 
l>erior8treet, and at residence, 131 Tenth ave.E 

jy|"B. H. PAKKEK EOBINSON^ 

VOCAL INSTKDCTION, 



8 MILES BLOCK. 



MCMILLEN & 
and sui 



rjL and superintendenu 
, Bzehauge building. 



8TEBB1NS, AKCHITECT8 
OfBoe, room No. 



PALMEK 
8u 



& HALL. 



&.arw!^Tg|lS^4Sj: 




*-*- 



' 1*- 



1- —-.'-.■*.•■ 'J =■• 



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* — ~ 



1 



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1 












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DUIiUTH EVENING HEEAIJ>« JANTJABY. 11, 1890. 



<& 



AGENTS FOR NONRESIDENTS 





FIRST MORTGAGE LOANS. 

I 
\ 

We can loan money at 6, 7 and 8 per cent interest on short or long tinne. No delay. Application for loans wanted in 

Duluth and the Superiors. 




CASH ON HAND TO LOAN IN ANY PARTICULAR AMOUNT DEISIRED. 



-:- -Real [state Bought for Nonresidents and by Contrac 

WE GUARANTEE RETURN OF PRINCIPAL AND 7 PER CENT INTEREST. SEND FOR A COPY OF OUR CONTRACT. 



We have a large list of ACRE AND CITY PROPERTY. We collect rents, pay taxes and attend to any business for nonresidents. 
Nonresidents owners of property, please correspond with us if you want to sell. No charge made for buying for you. 



IF YOU ARE NOT POSTED ABOUT THE GROWTH AND RESOURCES OF OUR CITY, WE WOULD BE PLEASED TO SEND 

YOU SOME FACTS. 



J01^Q■E3S cSc BR,-A-CE]. 



409 First National Bank Building, 



THE WEEK IN SOCIETY, 



It Has Been Rather a Dull 

Week in Duluth Social 

Circles. 



Some Note of Many People 

and What They Have 

Done. 



There has been but little going on in 
social circles in the city this week, there 
being a sort of lull from the week before. 
But it wont last long, as Lent begins in 
little over a month and there will be not 
a little gaiety before then. It would 
seem as it now was time to start the 
snowshoe and curling clubs of the city 
that were promiped for this winter. 
There is now plenty of snow and the 
woods are in excellent condition for 
snowshoeing, while the ice on the bay 
and the snow on the hillsides are excel- 
lent for sport. Unless something is done 
at once, spring will come before any runs 
are had. There have been a number of 
"bobsled" parties the past week, and 
many sleighing parties also. 

The second, since its reorganization, of 
the regular monthly meetings of the 
Ladies Aid society of St. Pauls Episcopal 
church was again held at the rectory. 
The ladies, through the kindness of Maj. 
Quinn, were very much entertained by 
stereopticon views of Paris. At the tirst 
meetinif, held at tte same place Nov. 9, 
the ladies listened to delightful music 
from Mrs. Stocker, Mrs. McKindley and 
Miss Quillard. 

The desire for an open educational in- 
stitution m Duluth is shown by the ap- 
preciation of the business people and 
general public towards the organizing of 
a literary institute in the city. The ob- 
jects are: To exchange thoughts on all 
live subjects, essays, debates, etc.; to ar- 
range for the establishing of a public 
library; to arrange for popular lectures 
at stated seasons; to aid all moral enter- 
prises; that it be a social as well as a 
literary institute; that it be an educa- 
tional institution; to establish branches 
in various parts of Duluth. A meeting 
will be held in the upper room of the 
Bethel kindly t^ranted by the Bethel as- 
sociation on Monday evening at 8 
o'clock. The meeting will be open for 
discussion and various committees will 
be appointed to carry out the necessary 
work. Everybody is cordially invited. 
The idea seems to t)e to establish some- 
thing in the line of the Chautauqua 
circles only p„-"lap8 broader. 

With I'euple. 

Mrs. J. J. Cressman and Mrs. L. M. 
Craddock started yesterday to Seattle 
intending to locate in business there. 

Mr. Fred Gordon, son of General Agent 
John Gordon of the Northern Steamship 
company, is to be married in a few days 
in Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. John Gordon 
were at cne time residents of Duluth 
and are remembered with pleasure by 
all old residents. Mrs. J. H. Upham 
will receive with Mrs. Gordon on the 
occasion. • 

Mr. Walter Turle left Monday for New 
York on his way to a visit in England. 
He will be abjent some time. 

Miss Slauson has returned from Chi- 
cago, where she has been visiting her 
parents. 

Vice-President Carpenter of the Du- 



luth ct Iron Range road has returned 
from his trip East. 

Mrs. S. H. Rothermel, Jr., has gone to 
Philadelphia to be absent about a month. 

Col. George E. Welles, secretarj- of the 
Board of Trade, is back from his Iowa 
visit. He is not much improved in 
health. 

Dr. and Mrs. R. O. Sweeny have re- 
turned from St. Paul, where Mrs. 
Sweeny has been visiting friends. 

Dr. V. Smith and wife are on their 
way for a winter's sojourn in Florida. 
They will pass the time with relatives, 
Dr. Smith's son living there. 

Mr. A. M. Baldwin, formerly of the 
law firm of Trussell, Prosser & Baldwin 
of Minneapolis, has decided to locate in 
Duluth. 

Mrs. Robert Louden and son arrived 
this afternoon after a month's absence 
visiting friends in the East. 

Mr. Luther Mendenhall left this morn- 
ing for a trip East, and will be absent 
several days. 

Mr. J. H. Harris of Harris Bros., has 
returned from a few weeks' sojourn in 
Cincinnati. 

Mrs. M. H. By water and son left this 
afternoon to spend a few weeks with 
friends at Washington, D. C. In a few 
days Mr. By water intends taking a trip 
to the state of Washington for several 
months. 

Pleasant AH'airs. 

The children's operetta, "Laila," was 
presented at Opera hall, West Superior, on 
the evenings of the 9th and lOth, under 
the auspices of Mrs. H. Nicholls of this 
city. There was a chorus of fifty voices, 
and the leading parts were assigned as 
follows: Laila, Miss Anna Sweeney; 
Fairy Queen, Miss St. Claire Nicholls; 
Beggar Mother, Miss Anna Tompkins; 
Gritfitti Ray, Master Albert Cross. 

Mrs. George Rupley entertained some 
lady friends at a lunch party Thursday 
noon. 

The week has seen the departure of a 
good many young people who have been 
spending their holidays at home. Per- 
haps thirty of them were here during 
the short vacation, many of whom are 
studying at the state university, some at 
Carleton and others elsewhere. 

R. C. Bendick, a noted temperance 
lecturer of New York, has been secured 
to give a series of lectures in this city, 
beginning Jan. 19.* The lectures are 
under the auspices of the W. C. T. U. 
The initial lecture will be given at the 
Opera house on the above-mentioned 
date, and afterwards will be continued 
at the First Methodist church nightly 
for three weeks. 

Patti said upon leaving Chicago: "I 
wish I could take the Auditorium and 
the boy soprano with me." The boy 
soprano, young Kavanagh, will be in IJu- 
luth next month again. 

WcHt Kn<l .Social. 

The Epworth league held a business 
meeting at the lecture-room of the 
Methodist church Tuesday evening. The 
next free social of the league occurs on 
the 29th. 

A number of young men gathered at 
the rooms of Joe Maurer Saturday even- 
ing, and greatly surprised him. The 
evening was spent mostly in conversa- 
tion and refreshments. 

The new literary society spoken of in 
The Herald some time ago will meet 
next Monday evening in the Bethel for 
the purpose of speaking to uptown 
people upon the project of forming a 
public library. 

The "Little Tycoon" was rehearsed 
last night in the Clat'endon hotel parlors. 

Invitation? are out announcing the 
marriage of Swan Carlson and Miss Ida 
Johnson to take place next Thursday 
evecing at Normanna hall. Both are 
well known here. 

The West End Social club held its 
fifth reception in Normanna Hall, 



Wednesday evening. The attendance 
was excellent. The Ladies Aid society 
furnished the supper. 

Ed. S. Lawer and Miss Kate Nelson 
were married at the residence of the 
brides parents on Fourth street last 
Thursday, by Rev. T. M. Findiey of the 
Second Presbyterian church. Mr. 
Lawer is an employe of the Duluth 
Elevator company, and is well known 
here. Miss Nelson is the daughter of 
H. C. Nelson. They will reside on Sixth 
street near Twent-Second avenue. 

A N EW. PL AY. 

Gilbert & SuIllTan's New Opera Presented 
in New York; Theatrical Gnsitip, 

Nkw Yokk, Jan. 11 — [Special.] — The 
company of English artists especially 
imported fer the proper presentation of 
Gilbert and Sullivan's latest operatic 
success, "The Gondoliers," arrived in this 
city about 9 o'clock yesterday morning. 
They came direct from Southampton on 
the Fulda. The company numbers about 
fifty-one people, including principals, 
choruses, costumes and business staff, 
and previous to their embarkation were 
thoroughly rehearsed in all the stage 
business and groupings of the original 
company, which is now singing the opera 
at the Savoy theater. The principal 
characters are cast as follows: 

Tlie Duke of Pla/.o-Toro la gTandt>e of Spain) 

Mr. George Tcmolc 

Luiz (liis attendant) Arthur Marid 

Don Alliambra del Bolero (the Grand In- 

ijul.sitor Mr. .J.A.Muir 

Marco Palmieri Rk-hard Clarke 

The Duchess ' f Plazo-Toro .... Miss Kate TulU-y 

Ca-siUla (her daughter) Agnes MacKarland 

Inez (the King's foster mother) 

Miss Uochefort 

None of tne people named above are 
known on this side of the water. Their 
individual successes on the other side 
could never have been very great, for 
Mr. Brooke, the business manager, was 
unable to tell anything concerning the 
principals or their previous work. He 
vaguely referred to one of the minor 
members of the company as an Ameri- 
can girl. 

It was probaby the obscurity in which 
the names of the principals are shrouded 
that led to the rumor that Mr. Carto, re- 
lying upon the intrinsic merit of the 
opera, had engaged a company of cheap 
amateurs for the American production. 
A. M. Palmer, under whose management 
the company will appear, gives assur- 
ances that the cast will in every respect 
be equal to the original one now playing 
in London. As Mr. Palmer is a most 
conservative manager, this assurance 
should be sufficient to set all doubts at \ 
rest. ' 

Theatrical Noteit. 

The academy of music at Milwaukee 
has been sold to John S. George, Francis 
Boyd and Calvin E. Lewis for $G5,0<X). 
It is the oldest theater in that city and 
has been leased by Jake Litt for the past 
five years. 

Lotta, who has been devoting herself 
to the management of the Park theater, 
Boston, this season, will go on the road 
again next season, and a tour has been 
booked for her extending to San Fran 
Cisco. She is rapidly recovering from 
the effects of her recent accident in 
Boston. 

Temple Opera Notes. 
Next Monday, Tuesday and Wednes- 
day Lillian Lewis will appear at the 
Temple in "Article 47," "As in a Look- 
ingglass" and "The New Magdalen," the 
latter, by Wilkie Collins, especially 
adapted for Mies Lewis. Her acting 
merits high praise, and has received gen- 
eral commendation. She is undoubtedly 
an emotional actress of groat power. She 
does not go too far or try to make too 
much of her part, but treads the danger- 
ous line between the natural and ex- 
travagant with that nice certainty which 
stamps her as an artist. The advantages 



of youth, beauty and talent are hers, and 
are undeniably great. Few persons 
possess such mobile and expressive 
features, so sweet a voice, or so tine a 
figure. 

The Temple was crowded with school 
children this afternoon at the "Uncle 
Tom's Cabin" matinee. The play holds 
the boards this evening. 

Kiralfy's "Antiope" company appears 
here Jan. 20 and '21. 

Managers say their receipts have been 
more for a short engagement in Duluth 
than for double the time m St. Paul and 
Minneapolis. Sol Smith Russell played 
to $80 one night recently at his home, 
the Flour city. 

The minstrel show given last year by 
local talent which was such a success is 
to be repeated this year with many ad- 
ditional and new features. Prepar- 
ations have already commenced for the 
affair. There is to be a chorus of forty 
voices. 

Messrs. Erickson and Vrets'nman, 
Temple Opera musicians, left this noon 
for Butte, Montana, to enter the orches- 
tra at Noboni's Theater Comique. Two 
more of the Temple orchestra will leave 
Monday for Butte. 



WEST END. 



A Couple of Accident)*; General Noteit of 
the Day. 

K. L. Reed, residing near the corner of 
Fourth street and Twentieth avenue, 
had a hot iron bolt dropped into his eye 
yesterday at the shipyard and is now 
under the care of Dr. Horace Davis. 

"Queen Mab," the well-known fancy 
skater, will give an exhibition tonight at 
the Parlor rink. Tonight the ladies' 
fancy skatinc race takes place at 
Twentieth avenue rink. A ?"-2 dressing 
case is the first prize. 

Andrew Holm, a laborer at the ship- 
yard, had his head badly cut this morn- 
ing by a falling V-shaped frame of iron. 
It made two wounds on the head. 

The little daughter of J. P. Daly is 
very ill with the fever and influenza. 

Emil Heiberg, a druggist of Monte 
video, is a visitor with his old friend 
Herman Stevens. 

Jas. Jensen has severed his connection 
with B. J. Skofstad, the First street 
grocer. 

Presente«l Vestments. 

Bishop McGolrick was waited upon 
last nisht by a deputation from 
the Union St. Jean Baptiste 
and presented with a handsome 
vestment for use at pontifioial mass. 
The presentation was made in graceful 
language by Levi Forrest, and feelingly 
responded to by the bishop. 

WEST DULUTH. 



BRETHREII OF THE GRIP. 



Notes of Many Local Secret 

Societies for the Past 

Week. 



Grand Army; Masons; Knights 

of Pythias, and Some 

of the Rest. 



Oliver Pelkey has received his patent 
for his new diving suit. Mr. Pelkey was 
a diver for many years, and never find- 
ing a suit that exactly pleased him, he 
set to work to invent one. This suit 
The Herald descritod fully in 1888. 

The guide mill was started again at 
the Car works yesterday and the other 
train of rolls was started again today. 

Tonight is the time appointed for the 
holders of the gas and water, electric 
light and street car franchises to pre 
sent their cause to the council. 



J. A. Boggs offers 50 feet on corner of 
First street and Nineteenth avenue west 
Easy terms if taken at once. 

A Corner in Kndion. 

The cheapest corner in this division; 
gas and water; graded avenue; street 
car: Short line; great bargain. 

Jones &, Brack. 



Borrow on hhort Time. 

We can make you some small loans on 
short time at best rates. 

Jones & Brace. 



Last Tuesday evening the public in- 
stallation of the newly-elected offijers of 
the Willis A. Gorman post, Lincoln 
camp. Sons of Veterans, and the 
Womans Relief corps took place. To N. 
A. Gearhart fell the honor of conducting 
the first installation exercises, that of 
the Relief corps. The following are the 
officers: President, Mrs. Lizzie Hoyt; 
senior rice-president, Mrs. Higgins; 
junior vice, Mrs. Spalding; chaplain, 
Mrs. Bellinger; treasurer, Mrs, Gear- 
hart; conductor, Miss Richardson; 
guard. Miss Corey. Recitations were 
delivered by Mrs. Edith McComber and 
Miss Lizzie Hoyt, then the officers of 
Lincoln camp— Captain, Fred H. Pel ton; 
tirst lieutenant, Fred HoUenberg; second 
lieutenant, Frank Smithlin; camp coun- 
cil, Frank E. Austin, Fred Stickles and 
E. H. Arnold — were installed by 
Alfred H. Morgan, colonel in com- 
mand of the Minnesota divi- 
sion. After a recitatation by Miss 
Daisy Hoyt, the officers of Willis A. Gor- 
man past were installed by C. D. Parker 
of St. Paul, junior vice-commander of 
the department of Minnesota. The 
officers are as follows: Commander, S. 
W. Higgins; senior vice, E. S. Dodd; 
junior vice, James Farrell; surgeon, S C 
Maxwell; quartermaster, George N. La- 
Vaque; officer of the day, S. R. Morris; 
officer of the guard, C. T. Griffin; chap- 
lain, M. F. Davey; adjutant, N. A. Gear- 
hart; sergeant-major, L. N. Young. 
After the installation, Mr. G«arhart pre- 
sented Post Commander Norris a hand- 
some gold badge in recognition of his 
services in building up the post. Re- 
freshments were then served by the Re- 
lief corps. 

The Willis A. Gorman post has been 
very prosperous during the past year. 
Twenty new members have been gained 
by muster and thirteen by transfer, a total 
gain of thirty -three. Five have been lost 
by transfer, one l)y honorable discharge 
and one by death. There are now 130 com- 
rades in good standing on the rolls. In 
twenty five years more the G. A. R. 
will have passed into history. 
Over 24,000 old veterans are dying each 
year. The number of members at the 
close of last year was 410,686. In the 
Sons of Veterans is an organization that 
will take the place of the older society. 
This organization already numbers over 
100,000. The Womans Relief corps is 
also extending its influence over the 
land. The G. A. R. has spent over 
82,000,000 for the relief of its members, 
and last year gave 8237,486. The 
Womans Relief corps also expendetl last 
year in charity $84,770. 



Eachran, R. R. Macfarlane and Willian 
Kerr. Rev. B. Mitchell was elected ai. 
honorary member. Arrangements wer< 
made to celebrate Burns' anniversary 
by a supper and ball, to beheld at tho 
St. Louis hotel, Friday, the 24th o' 
January. The receipts at the last meet 
ing were $124.10. 

Pythian Age: At the western ex 
tremity of Lake Superior, within a ter 
ritory of not over six miles square, is U • 
be found a population of but little ovei 
50,000 people, who probably have i 
greater proportion of Pythian Knighti 
than any similar locality in the eupremt 
jurisdiction. In the cities of Dulutl 
and Superior, where for three months ir 
, the year the reign of Ice and snow i£ 
paramount, are to be found eight 
Knights of Pythias lodges and an en 
thusiastic membership of over 100(i 
Pythian Knightp. It is a veritable 
Pythian stronghold and citadel, and it 
is a matter of pride to the Knights ol 
the Northwest that they should b« 
honored with such a distinction. Thin 
splendid result is the outcome of earnest 
and prudent work, and is an additional 
illustration of the fact that work is whal 
wins in the long run. We believe thert 
are no Knights in the country who are i 
greater credit to the order than are thos< 
in the Grand Pythian citadel of the 
Northwest. 

Many Knights of Pj'thias lodges art 
being formed in the Dakotas. It is s 
regular Pythian boom. 



THREE 



ACREAGE 



Sixteen members were initiated at the 
last meeting of Clan Stewart Thursday 
evening. These were: Andrew Jack- 
son, Amos Shepherd, A. Kinghorn, John 
M. McLeod, William Ritchie, Alex. Mc- 
Lean, E. A. Forsyth, R. P. Rodgers, K. 
D. Smith, Duncan McLeod, Thomas 
Gibson, John S. Wilson, John A. Mc- 



To Lecture on Temperance. 

The following ie a clipping from 8 
New York paper with regard to P. A. 
Burdick, who is expected to commence 8 
series of temperance meetings in Duluth 
on Jan. 19. "Mr. Burdick combines in 
himself a number of rare elements. By 
nature and by grace he is splendidly 
etquipped for his work. He at once en- 
lists and holds to the end the attention 
of his audience. He impresses you with 
a deep conviction of his downright 
honesty. He is tenderly sympathetic 
with all who have fallen victims to thie 
sin. His appeals are saturated with his 
personal faith in the power of Christ to 
save the lowest. He has an inexhaust- 
ible fund of anecdote and wit and sar- 
casm and logic wherewith to send the 
truth home to the conscience. He is ab 
Bolutely fearless. These, reinforced by 
a magnetism hard to be resisted, serve 
to make him a grand champion of a 
cause which today is challenging the 
best thought of this nation.' 

Notice, 

If people who will give clothes, shoes, 
etc., etc., for the sufferers in North Da- 
kota, will drop a postal card to one oi 
the undersigned before the 14th inst., 
the goods will be called for. 

M. O. Hall, State bank; Becker Sven- 
son, 2002 West Superior street; A. B. 
Lange, 419 and 420 Stenson block; 
Bredeson & Johnson, 103 First avenue 
east; A. Svenson, 13 West Sixth street; 
A. Granegger, 107 Lake avenue south. 

In order to give everybody a chance to 
participate in the benefits of our great 
holiday reduction sale, I have decided 
to continue it for the balance of this 
month. Don't miss the opportunity to 
get reliable goods at away-down prices. 
Sale closes positively Friday, Jan. 
31. Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 

There will be a ladies' race at the 
Twentieth avenue skating rink, Satur- 
day evening. First prize $25 dressing- 
case, second prize $5 dressing-case. 

Smoke the Endion cigar, the finest in 
the market. W. A. Footk & CJo. 



Bargains 



I ^ 



<-^^ 





A 



If taken at once. 



Land situated near 





—THE- 



The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptly. 



Greatest Snaps 



In the market. 





h 



ADDRESS 




BOX A A, DULUTH, MINN 






F 




DULUTH EViamrG HEBALD JAXtTABY 11 1890. 



Some Local Library Asso- 
ciations and Their 
Progress. 



How About the Duluth Public 

Library Boar.i and the 

Books? 



-— 




-«#i 



\ 




Factious Opposition Alone 

Delays a Useful 

Project. 



The Duluth public library ia still in a 
state of iDDocuous desuetude. That 
such IS the case is a matter of mystery 
to the unitiated. A large amount of 
moDey will soon be in hand for this pur- 
pose, about ^11,000, and yet the books 
remain unpurchased. In point of fact 
this money is and has been available for 
some months, although the cash cannot 
be obtained until after the June tax 

settlement. Any book concern would 
be ready and willing to place any num- 
ber of books m the shelves of the public 
library, knowmg they could to an abso- 
lute certainty get their pay within a 
statetl p««riod. 

The Uuluth public might just as well 
have been enjoying the benetit of a well- 
selected library for the past six months 
as to be deprived of such a privilege 
through the wrongheaded action of half 
a dozen individuals. 

The fact of the business is the library 
committee appointed by Acting Mayor 
Costello has not yet been con firmed, nor 
is it likely ever to be, as long as the 
present city council exists. As but one 
of the committee has resigned, and from 
present indications the grip will not 
claim any of them for its own. Cos- 
tello's position is somewhat unpleasant, 
and the public library matter is just 
where it was before the committee was 
ajjpointed. The gentlemen appointed 
were as follows: J. D. Ensign, 
W. W. Billson, A. R Maofarlane, C. Poi- 
rier, Dr. Jas. Mc.Vulitfe, J. D. Ray, Geo. 
Spencer, H. Berg and C. P. Johnson. 
The prmeipal objections made to these 
gentlemen was that one was not chosen 
from each ward. Mr. Costello is of the 
opinion that the gentlemen are qualitied 
in every respect to act for the best in- 
terests of the city as custodians of 
the library funds and fails to 
see the justice of requesting them to 
resign. At the same time he does not care 
to present their names to the council 
agam with the certainty of rejection. 
Consequently theie will be no library 
committee appointed until the nevv 
council tuke their seats. Then a library 
of -iUUO or 5u00 volumes will soon be on 
shelves and it will be added to as fast as 
a half mill tax can pay for books. 



and "The Palace of Art," with twenty- 
two illustrations from drawings by the 
late Edward Lear. 

The Cosmopolitan is springing into 
jjopularity very rapidly. Its January 
number is one of remarkable excellence. 
The frontispiece is a representation of 
Bouguereau's "Alma Parens." Notable 
among the illustrated articles is Eliza- 
beth Bisland's "Famous Beauties. 

The multiplication of societies of 
Christian Endeavor make the volume of 
selections compiled by Mrs. Castle most 
timely. It is entitled "Aids to En- 
deavor" and is designed for the use of 
members of Christian Endeavor societies 
and has an introtluction written by the 
president of the United Society of Chris- 
tian Endeavor. 

D. Lothrop company published this 
week Albert E. Winship's "The Shop," 
Mrs. Castle's "Aids to Endeavor." 
"Those Kaeburn Girls," by Mrs. A. F. 
Raffensperger, and a new volume in the 
Spare Minute Series — "Well-springs of 
Wisdom," selected from the writings of 
Frederick W. Robertson. 

Mr. Carnegie's "Triumphant Democ- 
racy," ia causing more trouble in the 
Old World. The first time the book was 
published in Germany the edition was 
quietly suppressed. Recently a new 
German translation was published, and 
now this has been interdicted. Alean- 
while, French, Spanish and Dutch trans- 
lations are making their way in ditferent 
parts of the world, the Spanish version 
lieing popular in South America. 

The Popular Science Monthly for Jan- 
uary contains a portrait of Alexander 
Wilson, the pioneer American ornithol- 
ogist; also his life. It has four illus- 
trated contributions — "The Future Situs 
of the Cotton Manufacture of the United 
States," by Edward Atkinson; "The 
Rare Forms of Orchids," by J. Dybow- 
ski; "Palm Trees and Their Uses," by 
M. J. Poisson; "Birds With Teeth," by 
Otto Meyer. 

"Seven Days After the Honeymoon" 
is the attractive title of a pretty little 
pamphlet issued by A. C. McClurg& Co., 
Chicago. It is a cookbook and has for 
its excuse for being that saying of Solo- 
mon "Stay me with flagons, comfort me 
with apples, for I am sick of love." It 
has full menus for a week and gives full 
recipes for the concocting of each article 
mentioned and contains therefore direc- 
tions for a good many dishes. It is a 
worthy member of the cookbook tribe, 
and in prettier dress than they. 

Edward Taylor, a strong free-trader, 
has written 'Is Protection a Benefit? A 
Plea for the Negative." It is published 
by A. C. McClurg & Co., Chicago. 
\Vhile Duluth is too near the head- 
quarters of the iron industry to feel par- 
ticularly friendly toward free trade any- 
one interested in the tariff question, and 
who is not. can not fail to be interested 
in the calm, clear way the author puts 
his points. 



the great tonic the trouble disappears 
Use the bitters for malaria, rheumatism, 
billiouaneas and kidney troubles. 



A MODERN RAVIN' 



[Buffalo BxpreM.] 
Once upon a day-dawn early, wblle I pondered. 

Bore and surly. 
O'er a hopeless hand— the twentieth iuch that 

I'd been dealt before — 
While I raved, profoundly cursing, thus my 

feelings frently nuralnK. 
And my shokels* fast disburalnir. threw I down 

and called for four; 
•"Tls the final time," I muttered; "Charley, 

deal me out Just four- 
Only this time — not once more. 

Ah, distinctly I recall it: How my stuff I out 
did haul it, 

Bettloff every single cent as I took up the new- 
drawn four; 

But, although I held three aces, never raked I 
in those "cases," 

So, with pitiful grimaces, went I out and loudly 
swore. 

"Won't you play this out?" they asked me, as 
my hair I wildly tore. 

Quoth I, ravlo', "Nevermore I" 



Money In any Amounts, 

Lowest rate of interest; no dela; 
Jones & 



B 



ippy je yEJii, 

The Season of Grand 
Resolves and Sol- 
emn Vows. 



All of Which is Well in Its 

Way, but Practice is 

the Thing. 



RACE. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 



DR. GEO. B. HATCOCK, 



Two Nights and Grand Satur- 
day Matinee. 



FRIDAY AND SATDRDAT. 

JAN'Y I and 



You Can All 
You Try, 

Better Try 



"Get There" 
You had 



if 



so 



THE NEW YEAR'S LEAF. 



I I 



The latest, best and probably the only 
reliable work on the situation in Panama 
and the Panama canal, is that of Dr. 
Wolfred Nelson, formerly of the state 
board of health, Panama, and for five 
years a resident of that region. It is 
issued by the Belford company. New 
York. That Dr. Nelson was not a resi- 
dent with shut eyes is evidenced by the 
book. It 18 a startling expose of the De 
Lesseps fiasco, giving as it does full 
quotations from official documents and 
reports. It is well illustrated from pho- 
tographs taken by the author in 1888, 
and is interesting as a mere book of 
travel. The climate, trade and produc- 
tions of Colombia are dwelt upon, and 
all matters relating to the "Gate to the 
Pacific" are discussed in extenso. El 
Castillo d'Oro, or the Spanish Main, 
seems to take definite shape in his 
hands. 

The lengthy account of "The Great 
Undertaker's Last Ditch," mentioned 
above, fixes the attention of all inter- 
ested in Trans Isthmian transit. A map, 
specially designed for the book by 
Messrs. Rand & McNally, together with 
twenty-eight illustrations, gives the 
reader the clearest views on the recent 
South Sea Bubble. The price of the 
book is 81.50. 

-:- 

"The Story of Tonty," by Mary Hart- 
well Catherwood, will interei-t a West- 
erner, a Duluthian, not a little, for was 
not Tonty a cousin to our own Greysolon 
Du Lhut, for whom our city is named 
and did not Tonty set foot on' the soil of 
Minnesota Point 200 years ago? The 
records, such as they are, say yes. But 
"The Story of Tonty" has other claims 
on our attentions. It has the charm of 
narrative and description of that earlier 
story by the same gifted author, "The 
Romance of Dollard," and like it is 
founded on history. In both the 
author has dipped into a time 
and place full of romance and 
brave excitement, and in both 
there is sadness, as there could not but 
be, as there was blood and death in all 
the adventures of LaSalle and his fol- 
lowers, Dollard and his fierce and honest 
French fighters. 

Of the two romances possibly Dollard 
is the sweeter, stronger story, but both 
show a master painter and Fort Fronte- 
nac and the fort "in the country of the 
Illinois" in the one, and Montreal and 
the "heroes of the Long Saut" in the 
other, could hardly have had a better 
immortalizer than Mrs. Catherwood. 
The "Romance of Dollard" is published 
by The Century company and the "Story 
of Tonty" by A. C. McClurg & Co. of 

Chicago, and the price of each is $1.25. 

_+_ 

"The Crime of the Century; or the 
Assassination of Dr. Patrick Henry 
Cronin," is the title of Henry M. Hunt's 
book giving an account of the discovery 
of the facts in connection with the 
Cronin murder, and the details of the 
prosecution of the conspirators who have 
thus far been brought to trial. It is a 
newspaper man's account, marked by 
accuracy as to fact and compactness of 
narration. It was rushed through like 
work for the press, and, as may be re- 
membered by Herald readers, fourteen 
hours after the trial of the conspirators 
was concluded a copy of the book was 
laid upon the desk of States Attorney 
Longenecker, who attests the corrects 
ness of the facts of the crime and trial as 
narrated by Mr. Hunt. The book is 
freely illustrated, and as a record of a 
great crime it possesses value that will 
increase as tim»» moves on. Mr. Hunt's 
took was published by the Peoples 
Publishing company, Chicago. Its sale 
IB already large, and deserves to be 
larger. 

-X- 

Itook Notes. 

The February Book Buyer will con- 
tain an evcremely interesting portrait of 
F. Marion Crawford— the first portrait 
of this famous author ever in a period- 
ical. *^ 

Boston has begun tke experiment of 
opening its public library in the even- 
ings. 

A work of high interest and import- 
ance, soon to be published by Scribner 
* Welford, will consist of three of Ten- 
nyson's poems, "To E. L.," "The Daisy » 



The Neglect uf the VuHeiuite. 

Century: "A competent judge has 
characterized the announced policy of 
an active member of the Yosemite Val- 
ley commission to 'cut down everj' tree 
[in the valley] that has sprouted within 
the last thirty years' as a policy 'which 
if it were carried out, would eventually 
result in an irreparable calamity— a 
calamity to the civilized world.' This 
member is represented as declaring that 
his policy has the support of the com- 
mission: it remains to be seen whether 
his associates will follow sucli fatuous 
leadership. But the history of the Yose- 
mite makes it only too probable that a 
crisis in its management is near at hand. 
"The American people are probably 
not aware of their proprietorship in the 
Yosemite. In 18G4, by act of congress, 
the valley and the grounds in the vicinity 
of the Big Trees of Mariposa were 
granted to the state of California 'with 
the stipulation nevertheless that the said 
state shall accept this grant upon the 
express conditions that the premises 
shall be held for public use, resort, and 
recreation; shall be inalienable for all 
time,' etc. Thus is recognized by law 
the moral claim of all humanity to an 
interest in the preservation of the won- 
ders of the world. A citizen of New 
York is as much one of the owners of 
the Yosemite as a citizen of California, 
and his right to be heard in suggestion 
or protest is as undoubted. There are, 
unfortunately, few resident Califor- 
nians who are well acquainted with the 
valley. An actual count has indicated 
that one-half of the visitors are foreign- 
ers, chiefly Englishmen, while one-fourth 
are from the Eastern states. The opin- 
ion of these 'outsiders' might be sup- 
posed to have a special value, being dis- 
connected with the local dissensions 
which have gathered about the valley. 

"It is unfortunate that the first public 
prr sdntation of the subject and the result- 
ant investigation by the legislature of 
California were complicated by per- 
sonal, political, and commercial consider- 
ations to such an extent as to obscure 
the important point— Has the treatment 
of the Yosemite landscape been in- 
trusted to skillful hands? We have be- 
fore us the report of this investigation, 
together with a large number of photo- 
graphs showing the conditions of por- 
tions of the valley before and after the 
employment of the axe and the plow. 
Without going into the details of the al- 
leged abuses, monopolies, rings and per- 
secutions, it is easy to see in the above 
testimony and photographs abundant 
confirmation of those who hold that the 
valley has not had the benefit of expert 
supervision. In saying this we are Hot 
impugning thegood faith of past or pres- 
ent commissions or commissioners, ap 
|X)inted for other reasons than their 
skillfulness in the treatment of land- 
scape. They are certainly to be acquit- 
ted of any intention to injure the valley; 
that would be unbelievable. It is no re- 
proach to them that they are not trained 
foresters. Their responsibility, how- 
ever, does not end there; it is, in fact, 
there that it begins; for, in the absence 
of knowledge of a professional nature, 
it should be their first aim to obtain the 
very best man or men available to d o 
this work." 



Stetson's Big Spectacular 



Dncle Tom's Cabio 



COMPANY. 



Big Double Bra«s Band and Orchestral Two 
Marksl Two Topseysl Thrilling Ice Scenel 
Genuine Cotton Picking Scenel Grand Trans- 
formation at the close of the performance. 
Uncle Tom's vision of Eva in Heaven. 

Incidental to the drama the following pleas- 
ing specialties will appear: Stetson's Famous 
Lone Star Quartet; the Original African Man- 
dolin Students; Kersand's Jubilee Singers. 

Grand Street Parade at noon. 

Sale of seatss open Thursday morning;, Jan. 9. 



Prices Reduced to 75c, liOv and 25c. 



PEOPLES THEATER. 



DULUTH, 



JOHN S. BARNES. Mgr. 



The Best Vafietj Stiow in the Northwest 



This week, commencing JAN. 6, 

FONDAS' 

COMBS OF STARS! 



A D fi/l i S S I O N : 



TEN CENTS ! TEN CENTS ! 



Performance commences at 8 p. m. sharp. 

HARWOOD'S 

Cit| Transportation Freight and [xoress, 

DRAYS. 

Office, 17 First Avenue West 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFICE 

17 Firjat AvwniiP Wflet. 




I 




IN THE GOLD ROOM. 



[Oscar WiJde.] 

Her Ivory hands on the ivory keys 
Straye<l Id a fitful fantasy. 

Like the silver glearu when the poplar trees 
Kustle their pale leaves listlessly 
Or the drlftinK foam of a restless sea 

When the waves show their teeth in the flying 

Her gold hair fell on the walls of jfold 
Lilie the delicate jfossatner spanurles spun 

On the burnished disk of the marijrold 
Or the sunflower of turuliiR- to meet the sun 
W hen the }f loom of the jealous nljrht is doae 

And the spear of the lily ia aureoled. 

And her sweet red lips on these lips of mine 
Burned like the ruhy Are that's set 

In the swinifiiijf lamps of a crimson shrine 
Or the bleediua- wouuds of the pomegranate 

u/u'L^'l'' •'^'ir'' °* "•? '""^"^ <irenche<l and wet 

with the split out blood of the rose red wlue 



Easily commands poBition as the 

Most PopQlar Family Paper Id tlie Conntry 

Without glvlnsr up any of its POPULAR 
FEATURES It continues to add NEW AT- 
TRACTIONS to its columns. To 

WO."HAN'S KINGDOM. 

THE FA KM .\ND HOME, 
THE CrKIOSITY SHOP, 

DEHGIITFII, COKKESPONDENCB 
tNTEKESTINO STORIES. 

THE NEWS OF THE WOBU> 

IT HAS ADDED THIS SEASON 

OUR YOUTH'S DEPARTMENT, 

Edited by UR3. FRANCES HODGSON 
BURNETT. 

It la intended to make this department 
both ENTERTAINING and INSTRUCTIVE 
not only to the chUdren but to every mem- 
ber of the family. The best and most popu- 
lar writers and educators have been en- 
gaged as contributors. This dejsartment 
Will equal in the character of its contents 
any publication for youn« poople in the 
country. 

A Series of Biical RoniaBces. 



Foor Huntanity ! 
The common lot is one of sorrow say 
—at least— the pessimists, thev who 
look a1 the worst side. Certainly what 
would otherwise be a bright existence, 
is often overshadowed by some ailment 
that hangs it like a pall, obscuring 
perpetually the radiance that else would 
light the path. Such an ailment, and a 
very common one, is nervousness, or in 
other words, weakness of the nervous 
system, a condition only irremediable 
where inefficient or improper means are 
taken to relieve it. The concurrent ex- 
perience of nervous people who have 
persistently used Hostettera Stomach 
Bitters is, that it conquers entirely su- 
persensitiveness of the nerves, as well as 
diseases-sfj called— which are invited 
and sustained by their chronic weak 
neas. As the nerves gain stamina from 



Written by famous noveUsta, will be ao. 
other new feature of THE INTER OCEAN. 
The Rev. Oeorg Ebers has written the 
first of the series, entitled "JOSHUA" 
Which began to run in the paper in Octo- 
ber. This Will be succeeded in January by 
one from the pen of EUzabeth Stuart Phelps 
author of -aates Ajar." etc. Her story will 
be a novel of the times of Christ, and will 
be entiUed "COME FORTH. " The famous 
a. Rider HaRgard will write a story of the 
early times of Babylon and Jerusalem to 
be enutled "ESTHER." There la no doubt 
but these stories wiU attract great atten- 
tion. 

In addition to aU this every yearly sub- 
scriber to 
THE WEEKLY OR SEMI-WEXKLT 
Will RECEIVE A BEAUTIFUI. ENORATINO 

Which of itseU ought to be worth the 
price of the paiser. 

To further accommodate Its readers THE 
RiTKR (K'EAS baa made a combination with 

THE HOME MAGAZLNE, 

Edited by MR.S. GCTERAL JOHN A. LOGAN, by 
which that paper Is sent for one jrear with 
THK WKKKLT IMEE OCEAN for One Dollar and 
Teti Cenu. Only think-BOTH PAPERS for 
$t.io. Thus every one can have reading 
matter of THi: BEST Ql'ALITT at the very lowest 
price. 



IChicago Herald. J 
Just now is the time when the avera^re man 
manager u«>g^ins to prospectively mentally plan. 

As the annual swearing off season draws near. 
Of the leaf he'll turn over the fli^t of the year. 
Evorythiujfthat is wrong from his life he'll 

etface. 
And nauKht that's unjust in his tlioujf ht« have 

a place. 
He's sure he has power all evil to shun 
When he says so and so then the business la 

done. 
But, in order to have his new plan broken In, 
He'd better not tarry a day to begin. 
And 'tis best he should not use the leaves too 

fast. 
Why not employ this year the leaf turned for 

last? 

Here we are the first of a new 
year as bright and happy as 
children with new toys. You 
have just closed up the record 
of the year 1889, and we sin- 
cerely hope the balance is in 
your favor— "by a large major- 
ity." If your expectations 
were not fully realized, we are 
very sorry indeed, and trust 
you will not think us too famil- 
iar if we commiserate with you. 
Well, never mind, don't feel 
badly because you failed to 
make the most of your oppor- 
tunities, for it can't be helped 
now. Recollect that there is 
no teacher in the world whose 
lessons are so impressive as 
Old Mother Experience. It is 
an easy thing to look back and 
see where you missed it, and 
then, too, in looking back at 
these bad breaks it seems so 
strange that you didn't know 
better. "Why," you say to 
yourself, "anyone who is half 
witted ought to have known 
better." That is true, but 
again we suggest that it does 
no good to harrow up your feel- 
ings in that way. The new 
year is spread out before you 
like a new blank book, all un- 
written. As the days go by 
the pages will be filled, one by 
one, and when the year is end- 
ed the volume will be closed 
and put away in your archives, 
and you will commence again. 
Since you commenced making 
up the book just closed, we put 
one cf the finest pieces of 
suburban property on the mar- 
ket anywhere about Duluth; 
and simply because we offered 
lots at extremely low prices 
and on the people's easy pay- 
ment plan, a good many inno- 
cent and honest persons sup- 
posed that it was all a humbug 
and a cheat. We can't much 
blame them for jumping at the 
conclusion that it was outside 
farm land, instead of fine resi- 
dence property, because our 
prices were so low and our 
terms so favorable. But that 
is where many of you made a 
BAD mistake. Had you inves- 
tigated, you would have invest- 
ed, and so made money. But 
you can make amends for that 
this year. Now, in strict confi- 
dence (which we beg of you 
not to repeat), we will tell you 
something: Water works, sew- 
ers and electric lights will be 
put in at Lakeside, Lester Park 
and Crosley Park, a system of 
parks and boulevards laid out, 
hundreds of fine new houses 
and comfortable homes built, 
suburban train service greatly 
improved— although it is ex 
cellent now— and the whole 
face of affairs changed. Lots 
that now sell for $125 each 
will then bring $250; lots that 
now sell for $200 will readily 
sell at $400, and so on. It is 
hard to understand how people 
who feel assured that all this 
great growth is so near at hand 
should wait. The way to make 
money is to get ahead of the 
crowd and buy before the ma- 
jority of people do, and before 
the developments occur. Now, 
if you want to start out the new 
year right and make a record 
with which you will be satis- 
fied, take our advice and buy 
lots in Crosley Park, and buy 
NOW. If you wan't to make 
your money go as far as possi- 
ble, and thus make the utmost 
with it, buy what you can reach 
on the easy payment plan and 
keep up your weekly instal- 
ments, and you will be delight- 
ed with the results. Remem- 
ber, you will have no interest 
to pay, and that makes quite 
a difference. 

Hoping that you will do your- 
self a kindness by following 
our advice, and wishing you all 
a most happy and prosperous 
new year— and many succeed- 
ing ones— we beg leave to sub- 
scribe ourselves 



BliiUI 



FOR SALE: 

50-H--ln Hcreage, - - $2,500,000 

49-15-ln Icreaje, - 1, 
Superior Street - - 1, 
Dock Property, - 



Lots for Sale as 
as $25 each. 



low 



APPLY TO 



The price of THE WEEKLY INTER OCEAN k (1 per yew 

The price of THE SEMI-WEEKU is f2 per year 

Send for sample copies. Liberal terms to 
postmasters and club agents. 

Address THE INTER OCEAiN. Chicaeo. 



Your real(ty) friends, 

c. t Loe 1 CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. 



R. CULLEN 



601 West Superior Street. 



CHRIST IAN SC IENCE. 

FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table Is supplied, and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



NOTICE. 



The rejrular annual meeting 
holders ot the Piret National Bank of Tower 
will be held at Its office In Tower, Minnesota, 
on Tuesday, January 14tli, 18W), between the 
hours of 10 o'clock a. m. and 4 o'clock p. m., 
for the election of directors and for such other 
business as may come before the meeting. 
G. W. Hkrtoes, 

Tower, Minn., Cashier. 

December 13th, 1889. 



FOR SALE 



Forty Acres 



ADJOINING 



[W LONDON 



-AT A 



Bargain 



CAUTION 



return of the shoes in good condition. 



"W. Li. Doug-ias' name and the price 

are stamped on the tottom of all Shoef 
- r — — — — ■^ « «. advertised by him before leaving ht 

factory; this protects the wesrers against high prices ai.d infftrior g'jOde 
"your dealer does not keep the style or kind you want, or oirv.-rs you sheer .vithot 
W. Ij. Douglas name and price stamped on them, and savs thev are just a 
good, do not be deceived theieby, but send direct to the Facto'ry for" you <in ee 
what you want by return mai , postage paid. Dealers ma ivc more pVofit on un- 
known shoes that are not wai ranted by anvbodv ; tbsrefore do not be induced to 
buy shoes that have no reputation. Buv only those that have W. L Doufflarf 
name and the price stamped on the bottom, and you are sure to get full value for 
your money. Thousands of lollars are saved .annuallv in this country by the 
wearers of ^ . L. Douglas' Shoes. In ordering b, mail state ^vl,ether you 
want Congress. Button or La ;e, London cap toe, plain French toe, or narrow^n 
toe, arid be sure to give size i nd width vou wear. I can fit any foot that is not d^ 
formed as my shoes are mad ■ in a great variety of widths, sizes and half sizes. I 
l"™"!r^.u Au?5?yiPL''.^!."*^->'.??'l perfect satisfaction or money refunded upon 

W. i.. OOUGI.AS, Brockton, Mass. 

W. L. DOUGLAS 
$3 SHOE cen^t^Imen. 

Is II fine seamless calf shoe, with Oongrola 
tops and dak Leather bott4«m<. They are 
nrnde in Coi.Kress, Button and Laoe on I-on- 
don Ca|» Toe, Narrow Cap loe, and Plain 
Vr.'" '^*"' ''»***'^''n "•"'S from 5 to 11. in- 
cludiiiH: huU sizes ,.„„| in aU width". If yon 
have l,.-.-n payiiiB from ftS to S6 for shoes 
of thlH MiialUy do notdo so longrer. One pair 
will weariiK long an Iwo pairs of common 
•boef) Kol.l by d<ali-r» tJuit are not warranted 
by the niaiuifa«-tur<T. 

Oui- oIiiin)H for this nhoe over all other *3 
•h«>e8afl»:Tti«<d, ar«> : 

let. It roiitaing better materiaL 

2d. It in more styUsh. t>etter fitUne anu 

dnraliie. " 

3d. T( Ri v.s better Rencral sntinfaction. 
4t'i. If costs more money to make, 
fitl.. If .s.'iveM more money for the conHumer. 
6tli. It it* Kold by more dealers thruuRhout 
the V. S. 

It' 4 great success Is due to merit. 
It cannot be dupU<«t«d by any other 
manufacturer. 

It is iiie best in the world, luid has a 
larfrcr demand than any other S3 
shoe advertised. 

$6,000 will be paid to any pei son who w ill i.rove t he above statements to be nntrne. 
The Following Lines will l.e found to be t.f the Same Quality of KxoeUenoe. 

SS.OO SHOI^ OKNt'INK HAND-SKWKn which takes the pUce of cu». 

•l'*'"^'V^ VSri^^K^ t jm-m;iie s.!.ocs tliat cost from J7 to f<j. 

Si A OO 5^1-II^P ]'"*^ ORIOINAI, AND ONLY H.VND-SEWKI) WEtT 

•*'^"^'^' **Il*^^ «14 SIIOK. Equ.-.is custom-m;icle slices costing Ironi $6 to $8. 
Si*k *5fl SUnP I'OKI'OLICK.'VIKN. Railroad Men and Letter Camera aH 
•9^m%3\J On\i/Ci \eartlier.,. Smooth inside as a Hand-Sewed Slioe. No llcfc. 

i-. r Wax Thread to hurt the feet. ^*^" 




7th. 
8tli. 

9th. 



f )r tlie price. 



ttO f%f\ SHOE 1 !$rNF.XC£I.L,CD FOB HEAVY W£AK. 

$2!25 SHOE 
$2.00 SHOE 



Best Calf Shoe 



irOKKINGM^-S. Is the best In ttie worid for rough wearj 

c lie pair ought t<^vcar a man a year. 

1 S EQUAL TO SHOES THAT COST TKOJ9 93 TO 9SJi0k 

( lie pair will wear longer tiian any slioe ever sold at the price. 
ttO OO S H O E * ^^ BOYS is thn best School Shoe In the world. 



€t,i "7 f? Q U O P ^ OUTU'S SCHOOL, rives the small Boys a chance to 
QFl ■ # 9 on \^ Ci tl le best slioes in tlie woHd. 



wear 



All made in Congress, Button ai d I„ir.-. 

W. L. DOUGLAS; $3 AND $2 SHOES 



FOR 

LADIES. 

and B, C. D, E and EE widths. 



Both Ladies' Shoes arc made in si/.o: fi oui i ty 7, in :luciiiiij luilf • 

STYLES OF LAOIES' SHOES. 

"The French Opera," "Thn Spanish ,\rch Opera," "The American Common. 
Sense," "The Medium Conim »n-Sensf." All made In Button in the Latest Styles. 
Also, French Opera in Front Lace, on S3 Shoe only. 

f:onsumers should remember thit W. L. DOUGLAS is the largest and only Shoe Manufacturer 

In the world, supplying shoes direct from factory, thus J ' '" ■ 

weaier. 



FOR SALE BY 



Hg giving all the middle-men's profits to this 
W. Im DOUGLAS. Brockton, Maaa. 

SUFFEL & C 




WADe 
ONLY 



N.K.rAlRBANKiScC0.-^ CHICAGO. 



NO ALUM — NO AMMONIA — NO LIME- 
NO PHOSPHATES, IN 



♦ 



^CREAM 

Baking Powder 

MOST PIZRFECT MADE. 

Its superior excellence rrover in millions of homes for more than a quarter of a 
eeotory. It is used by the Uniiec States Government. Endorsed bv the heads of the 
Omt Universities as the Stronges:, Purest and Most Healthful. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO. 

W YORK. CHICAG( ). ST. LOUIS. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Inquire of 



L. w., 



O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Rooms S10, Sn and SI?. Dulutli Union National Bank Building. 



MEMBERS OF THE 



DDLDTH CLEARIl^G HODSE ASSOCIATION. 



Post office Box A A. 



American Exchange BanJ: 
Bell & Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Security Bank of Duluth 
State Bank of Duluth 
National Bank of Commerce 
Marine Bank 



CAPITAL. 

$300,000 
100,000 

1,000,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
250,000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

10,000 

100,000 

26,000 




1 



w 



/ 



i 




•J.'.u I as 





axj f m, m iii j i 




l>Lri,UTH MYMSIKG HEBALDi JAiNXJAKY IK 1890. 




— 




GOGEBIC BOILER WORKS. 



BUILDS BOILERS, TANKS AND BREACHING 



■u- 






\ 



kilki 










J > 



-fc^ a 





" Sheet Iron Work of Jails and Tanks a Specialty - 




SECOND HAND ENGINES AND BOILERS ALV/AYS ON HAND. 



REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



J. F. O-A-CES^y. 



OFFICE AND WORKS, 409 LAKE AVENUE SOUTH. 



TELEPHONE SOL 



WAS H NAIUeilL OHATOB 



But a Cold West. Did Not 
Listen to His Impas- 
sioned Address. 



Experience With One Who 

Would Turn the World 

on Edge. 



A Reminiscence of the Famous 

Riel Rebellion of 

1885. 



A few weeks after the execution of 
Riel, the ^'Ianitoba rebel, the writer 
while at work in his office, was startled 
when his door opened suddenly and a 
thick-set, medium-sized man, perhaps 
thirty-tive years old, entered. He was 
attired in hunting costune; buckskin 
leggings gaily fringed adorned his 
lower extremities. His feet were en- 
cased m moccasins, through one of 
which his big toe obtrusively protruded. 
His coat was of buckskin and had evi- 
dently seen its best days, for it was de- 
cidedly dilapidated. An old, frowsy 
muskrat cap was perched rather inse- 
curely on the top of an equally frowsy 
head. Straggling locks dangled in pro- 
fusion round a neck not over clean. A 
swarthy complexion, rendered more so 
by evident unfamiliaranty with soap and 
water, completed the resemblance to a 
half-breed Indian, and. as such I was 
prepared to receive him. 

Judge of m\ surprise when addressing 
me in pure, retined English he began 
questioning me as to the size of the 
town, character of the people, what the 
sentiment was toward the Indians in the 
Northwest, etc. 

Answering these and other questions 
of a like import to the best of ray ability, 
and wondering profoundly as to who or 
what this strange apparition could be^— 
with a sudden movement he gained the 
center of the office floor, and, striking a 
dramatic attitude, he let loose a flood o 
eloquence, startling in its vehemence, 
and full of dramatic power. Every 
gesture suggested grace and dignity; his 
enunciation was clear and distinct. 
Occasionally he would emphasize his re- 
marks with a stamp of his mocassined 
foot, which detracted somewhat from the 
effect of his inspired words. It was a 
tirade against the Canadian government, 
a bitter torrent of invective upon the 
soldiery, an impassioned homily extol- 
ling the memory of the dead rebel, Riel. 
When he had tinished, tears were in his 
eyes. 

"I beg pardon," he said "for so forget- 
ting myself as to commit such an im- 
propriety, but this subject is one upon 
which I feel strongly, more so than I can 
express." I hastened to assure him that 
I enjoyed his eloquence, and that he was 
welcome to spout all he desired in my 
presence and he would be assured of an 
interested if not a sympathetic audi- 
tor. He graspe*! my hand with his dirty 
palm, and thanked me warmly "My 
name," said he, "is Jackson, William H. 
Jackson. I was Louis Reil's private 
secretary." 

He then paused to see what effect his 
statement would have upon me. Being 
satisfied that I was sufficiently overcome 
tor if he had told me he was the lost 



; Charlie Ross my surprise would not ' 
have been greater, he continued: "1 
have just started out on a lecturing tour. , 
So far I have not been received with 
crowded houses, but as I am getting 
into the states, I find the peo- 
ple more disposed to listen to me. 
At Fargo I had an audience of twelve 
persons, including four complimentaries. 
My printing bill was ;g4 or 65 and my 
hall expenses twice as much, to saj 
nothing of hotel bills and other trifles. 
I was in a bad flx and had to leave the 
town in debt. As I had no money at 
all, I walked here (about sixty miles) 
and I want a few bills printed, announc- 
ing that I will lecture at the Opera 
house tonight. I must apeak tonight, for 
I am totally destitute and have no place 
to stay unless I can raise a little money." 
Well, I printed the bills, which were 
duly circulated, but the day being cold 
and stormy, only twenty-five turned out 
to hear the impecunious lecturer. His 
subject was "Louis Kiel, a Martyr," and 
he handled the theme with an enthusi- 
asm worthy a far better cause. 
The audience was interested, but 
not enthused, and the orator's efforts 
were treated with indifference and re- 
ceived with laughter. The next morn- 
ing Mr. Jackson presented himself at 
my office. "Well," said he, "I'm no 
belter off than I was yesterday. They 
let me off without paying for the hall, 
and now I must ask a similar favor of 
you, for I am cleaned out of every cent, 
and I want to get to Brainerd somehow. 
I s'pose I'll have to foot it," he added in 
a burst of recklessness. "I'll send you 
the money as soon as I earn it," said he 
earnestly. 

What could I do? Secretary Jackson 
departed, and I supposed I had seen and 
heard the last of him, but a few days 
afterwards I received a letter from him 
which said, "Arrived at Brainerd yes- 
terday; lectured last night to a twenty- 
five dollar house, but hall rent 
and a new pair of mocassins absorbed 
the receipts. I suppose you have classed 
me among your list of dead beats, but 
don't be too hasty and I'll soon send you 
the money. I won golden opinions last 
night and was presented with a new suit 
of clothes. My next point is Duluth, 
and thank fortune I will not have to 
walk. From what I can learn Duluth 
will be a good town to operate in. After 
two or three lectures there I will get a 
manager and go through the Eastern 
states in a business-like way." As my 
friend Jackson did not write again it is 
evident Duluth did not come up to his 
expectations, and the probabilities are 
that he ended his career in the depths 
of Lake Superior, as 1 have never heard 
from him since, and he is still indebted 
to me in the sum of 12.50. Should this 
sketch meet his eye, he may remit, who 
knows'' Bkock. 



HABITAT OF THE SEAL. 



Points on Care and Keep of 

Seal Skins and f\4ethods 

of Catch. 



Fur Seal Islands and the New 

Terms of Government 

Lease. 



"We have a little bet which has been 
left to you to decide," said one of the 
two men who entered a saloon on Grand 
River avenue the other day. 

"Well, what is it?" 

"My friend here says that every sa- 
loon-keeper look upon every other man 
as a sharper. I say no." 

"I don't think so." 

"Well, the bet is this. You don't 
know me. Never saw me before. You 
must judge me by my face. I come in 
and lay my watch down on the bar and 
ask for the loan of $25 until noon. The 
bet is $5 that you wont grant it. That 
is, I bet you do, and my friend here that 
you don't. It is for you to decide." , 

The bartender picked up the watch, ! 
opened the cases, poured out the tobacco ', 
which constituted the "works," tossed '' 
the cases in the big spittoon, and wear- 
ily said — 

"Please don't! I saw this the year the 
war broke out! Why don't you fellows 
either get something new or go to work 
with a wood saw?" 



However the differences between the 
United States and Canada may termin- 
ate in regard to seal-hunting in Behring 
sea, it is certain that the lair ones will 
not be deprived of the garment so dear 
to them for many year^ to come, but a 
good round price must be paid for the 
luxury. 

Ihat the sealskin cloak should be ex- 
pensive is not to be wondered at when 
we consider that it takes the skins of 
three animals to make a garment of 
ordmary size, and that only U)0,0<X) ani- 
mals are allowed to be killed annually 
by the company which has the monopoly 
ot sealing in Behring Sea. Under 
the new contract but (M),0(X) may 
be killed annually and the expense 
of killing will be also increased. 
The islands of St. Paul and St. George 
are the fur-seal stockyards of the world 
and little decent fur is obtained else- 
where, though there are seals elsewhere 
notably on the coast of Scotland. The 
seals come here from the ocean every 
year, the females, guarded by the males, 
taking their esise and feeding their 
young, who begin to multiply soon after 
the arrival. 

The first case of the old males is to 
drive away the "bachelors" or male seals 
under »i years of age to a distant part of 
the island. It is tfiese "bachelors" who 
fall preys to the sealers and none others 
are killed, with the exception of a lim- 
ited number of the young puppies which 
the natives are allowed for food. The 
flesh is tender and succulent and con- 
sidered delicious eating. 

When it is desired to obtain the skins, 
natives employed by the sealing com- 
pany go to the quarter of the island 
where the "bachelors" are resting, and 
getting between them and the water 
frighten them by loud noises and shouts 
into inland slaughter pens. Here they 
are knocked on the head, and the skins 
stripped off, salted and packed into the 
hold of the sailing vessels. The practice 
in vogue among Canadians of shooting 
the seals in the water is attended with 
many evils. The females with young 
are often killed, and out of three ani- 
mals shot, only one on an average is re- 
covered, for the reason that they sink so 
quickly. And then the hides are in- 
jured by the bullet holes. 

The fur seal must not be confounded 
with the pair seal, which latter is hunted 
with a fleet of vessels which goes out 
every year from Newfoundland and 
returns with the hide and oil of 300,000 
seals. The hide of the hair seal is only 
of use for leather. Most of the fur hides 
are shipped to London, where only the 
process of transforming them into the 
glossy article known as sealskin is suc- 
cessfully conducted. The long, bristly 
hair which in a state of nature are alone 
visible are removed by a peculiar process 
revealing the downy undergrowth of fur, 
beautiful alike to sight and touch. 
This is a light buff color and is dyed by 



a secret process to the beautiful "seal 
brown" HO much admired. 

In conversation with a Duluth furrier 
friend of mine, he said tiiis: "A seal- 
skin garment though very expensive is 
in the end the cheapest article in a fur- 
rier's stock. With proper usage it will 
wear and retain its beauty, for five or six 
seasons, and with a few judicious attrac- 
tions will be serviceable for many years 
longer and is always fashionable. The 
heaviest storm will not injure sealskin a 
particle, though I should advise 
the ladies possessing these articles 
not to dry them by a fire- 
or fold them up while wet, but spread 
them out and let them dry naturally. 
.\nother thing, though I ought not to 
say it from a business point of view, it 
is an unnecessary expense to send a 
sealskin to a furrier's for the summer. It 
is the only fur which moths will not 
touch, and is absolutely safe from them. 
Rub the fur the wrong way, hang it up 
in a closet or put it into a trunk, and 
it's all right, and you may dismiss it 
from your mind until wanted the next 
winter." 

Secretary Windom will receive sealed 
proposals until Jan. 2;{ for the exclusive 
right to take fur seals upon the islands 
named for twenty years. In additioj to 
the specific requirements of the statutes 
the successful bidder will be required to 
provide a suitable building for a public 
school on each island, and to pay the ex- 
penses of maintaining schools during a 
Ijeriod of not less than eight months in 
each year, also to pay to the inhabitants 
of the islands for lalx^r performed by 
them such price as may be prescribed by 
the secretary. The number of seals to 
be taken for their skins during the year 
ending May 1, 1801, will be limited to 
tX),0(X), and for succeeding years the 
uumL>er will be determined by the secre- 
tary J. M. H. 



extensions, between Lester river and 
the western limits of West Duluth, or 
up and over the hill as far as may be 
desired on at least one avenue in Duluth 
and one in West Duluth or Oneota, at a 
si)eed of from eight to ten miles an 
hour, and stop at any street crossing on 
the line at which a passenger may desire 
to alight, one toat can be depended upon 
to do this at all seasons. A parallel line 
at or near the top of the hill might also 
be added and other lines run up and 
over the hill as the population increases. 
Such a system is entirely feasible, and I 
believe the capital would be forthcoming 
to build it if other and inadequate 
schemes should not be in the way and 
so far advanced that they cannot be dis- 
placed except at heavy expense. If Du- 
luth's citizens are alive to the import- 
ance of the convenient, quick and reli- 
able passenger transportation demanded 
by her peculiar situation and topography 
they will not encourage either the con- 
tinuance of their present mule line, or 
passenger hoisting system on Seventh 
avenue, nor any system that cannot be 
successfully operated with a wet, icy or 
snow covered track. X. 



w 




Purchasers for 



OUR OUTSIDE EDI i ORS. 



A New Vurkcrs Belief. 

To the Editor of The Herald. 

New Yokk, .Jan. 6. 
I have read with especial interest 
your reports and suggestions from time 
to time concerning the proposed addi- 
tional stroet transportation lines in Du- 
luth, because I have had a very positive 
opinion since I first set foot in Duluth 
of what she really needs in that direc- 
tion. I judge from what you say that 
plans are so far matured that the com- 
pletion of the electric extension of the 
Superior street mule line to the west, 
and the Seventh Avenue Incline railway 
is probably only a raattet of time. In 
my judgment, if I understand the 
schemes correctly, these enterprises will 
retard and injure rather than advance 
Duluth's real interests; this for the rea- 
son that, in so far as they at all answer 
any immediate needs of the city and the 
wishes of her real estate speculators, 
they will delay if not prevent what the 
ultimate needs of the city require. 

One who has given much thought to 
the problem of pas-senger transport- 
ation in cities and observed the various 
attempts to solve them, must see on a 
glance at the situation of Duluth and 
the natural obstacles in the way of her 
growth, that she needs something more 
than a disjointed combination of Texas 
mule, electricity and freight hoist. As 
a freight and heavy traffic elevator, the 
Seventh avenue line may be needed and 
do very well; out any attempt to make 
anything else of it will, just so far as it 
succeeds, prevent the building of the 
line for passenger traffic up and over the 
hill that is needed. 

What Duluth needs, and must have, 
if her growth is to be anything like 
what her citizens expect, is a single 
homogeneous system of transportation, 
that will take a passenger to any point 
on, say F'irst or Superior street and its 



To Compete With the Clyde. 

i To the Editor of the Herald: 
! Out of curiosity I am led to read the 
I free trade articles of a Duluth morning 
paper, as I am one of the high tariff 
cranks alluded to by it. It gives a re- 
hash of the old free trade yarn that the 
decay of American shipping is due to 
' the high tariff. This yarn has been so 
often shot out by the free trade element 
that it has come to believe it. I will 
give the correct cause of the decay of 
American ocean shipping. We will go 
back to about 1850, when American 
shipping was at its best— when oak was 
the material that ships were made of— 
the United States had a surplus of that 
material, hence it was cheaper to build 
woollen ships in this country, and when 
the ingenuity of American shipbuilders 
put up ships that would outsail any- 
thing. It was about that time that the 
Clyde builders found that iron was 
superior to wood, and as they had learned 
to construct a part model, the iron ships 
of the Clyde took the place of wooden 
ships of America. Then came the war, 
when the Alabama drove the American 
flags from the high seas. But a change 
has come, and the time is but short 
when the American steel built ship will 
hold their own with the far-famed Clyde 
ships; in fact, it requires no great fore- 
sight to say that the time is not far dis- 
tant when ships will cross the ocean 
built in Duluth in competition with 
those of the Clyde. F. W. 



M Ifaluatile aod Nice-Lying Lots 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 




-:- WILL BE SOLD VEHY CHEAP -:- 



DE LICKER IN DE JUQ. 



Wen do 'possum's in de skillet an' de tater 's 

on do h'u'th, 
Wen de nioUycotton "a settln' in de dark briar 

path, 

, Wen do crawfish digs his cellar an' de robin 
' hunts lie l)Uif~ 
Dat's de time ter tek a pull f 'um de little Ucker 
Jug:. 

Wen do weevil 's in do corn and de beaver 

bull s Ills ilam, 
Wen do niuloy oow 's or scootln' fum de ole 

black rum, 

W'en de poodle '8 sleepln' sweet on de warm 

parlor rug: — 
Dafs de time ter liit de Btumick wld de Ucker 

in de jugr, 

•Von de fros' is on do punkin an' de corn Is in 

de shock, 
Wen de farmer 's shootln' rabbite 'stid er 

tendin' ter hU stock, 
Wen de preacher wants terbackor an' Jes' 

pockets all yo' plug— 
Dai B do time ter jflt consi lement f'um de 

licker in de Jujf. 

Wen de 'lection sroes crirln you. an' ro' 

monej- 's all g-une, 
W'en yo' uelKhlwr's cattle Jumps de fence an' 

tromples down yo' corn. 
Wen to' goes ter git yo' tators an' fln's der all 

is dug— 
Dat's do time ter brace de backbone wld de 

liuker in de Jug. 



-ALSO- 




Three Good Building Lots on linth Street. 



Near Thi-d avenue east 



All these are well located and very accessible. 
Good schools and jjraded streets close by. 



Apply by \eUer or in person to 



"ED," 



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DULUTH EVEIONG HMKALD ^TANVABY 11 1890. 



E. 



PERSONAL. 



The Markets Are All Dull 
Grain and Stocks 
Today. 



for 



Gossip of the Boards; Daily 

Movement; Prices on 

Stock. 



The week closes with a very dull 
wheat market. Though there has been 
considerable fluctuation in prices, with 
a few days of weakness, the close today 
is only I4 below that of last Saturday 
for both cash and May. 

All the trading of the day was in May 
at last night's closing prices. The ex- 
ports from the seaboard were small, 
while cables were weak and dull and 
speculation was stagnant at all markets. 
Wheat on track ruled at a good premium 
over cash wheat in store. 

Cash 1 hard clcsed at 79 sellers and SO 
for on track; No. 1 northern regular 
closed at IG bid and on track at 79; No. 
2 northern closed at I'l bid; January 
closed at 79 nominal. May 1 hard sold 
and closed at 8-1 '^ '^"^^ ^ northern closed 
at 81}4 nominal. 



The Week's Movement. 

Estimating today's receipts of wheat 
at 5000 bu, corn 10,CKX) bu, and oats 15,- 
000 bu, and wheat shipments at 25(.M) bu, 
the week's movement here has been: 
Receipts— Wheat, 02,000 bu; corn, 73,- 
5«X>; oats, 35,(XX>. Shipments — Wheat, 
36,500: corn, 20,745 bu. These figures in- 
dicate an increase of wheat stocks of 
about 25,000 bu, corn 53,000 bu, oats 
35,000 bu. 

The Daily Movement. 

Cars on track; Wheat, 7; com, 20: 
oats, .3. Receipts: Wheat, 4219 bu; corn, 
10,042 bu. Shipments: Wheat, 379 bu. 
Inspection: Wheat, 9 cars 1 hard, 5 of 1 
northern; corn, .33; oats, 5. Minneapolis 
cars on track, 280. Receipts there were: 
Wheat, 168,980 bu. Shipments: Wheat. 
12,200 bu; Hour, 21,113 bbls. Chicago 
cars on track: Wheat, 81; corn, 421; oats, 
130; rye, 19; barley. 6d. Wheat cars at 
the three places, 372. 



The Itaiik Statement. 

New York, Jan. 11.— The weekly bank 

■tatemeut shows the following changes: 

Reserve, increase W.25!(,:i«i 

Loans, i acreage tST.TlHi 

Spet-e, iiicrt-iise 3,-.'.Vi.-1iii 

LejfHl tC'uatTS, increase 2,aso,luO 

Itepositn. iiK-reiise 5,IuS.4iiip 

CirL-ulation, iuert-ase 4,SillO 

The banks now hold 86,015,700 in ex- 
oees of the 25 per cent rule. 



Mr. II. C. Stearns, a Jackson, Mich., 
business man, is at the St. Louis. 

Mr. Charles E. Morgraw and daugh- 
ter. St. Paul, are guests at The Spalding. 

H. N. Sitzer and wife, Fergus Falls, 
are staying at The Spalding. 

Archbishop Ireland will arrive in Du- 
luth this afternoon over the Eastern. 

Capt. F. W. Burnham of Company F, 
M. N. G„ a prominent real-estate man 
of Fergus Falls and Superintentent Dor- 
sey of the N. P.. F. & B. H. railroad are in 
the city looking up the chances for in- 
Vrtt-tment in Duluth realty. 

A. B. Siewert has returned from a two 
weeks' trip to Oshkosh and Chicago. 

Mr. Archibald Young, ex-acting chief 
of the department of frauds. United 
States interior department, is in the city 
today on his way to the Pacific coast. 
Mr. Young is now a member of the 
Washington law-firm of Lamar, Philips, 
and Zachay. 

Mr. A. G. Uauses, Milwaukee, is at 
The Spalding. 

Mr. J. S. Billings, an Ashland business 
man, is in the city. 

Mr. L. Lues, Chicago, is registered at 
The Spalding. 

Next Week's Concert. 

On Friday evening, Jan. 17, there will 
be a concert at the Bethel, for the benefit 
of that institution. The program will 
be rendered by local talent. The attrac- 
tions are Miss French, the new soprano 
of the Presbyterian church, and Mr. Col- 
lins, a pianist, recently located here; also 
there will be a cornet solo by Dr. Holden, 
a violin solo by Mr. Fuller, and a dra- 
matic reading by Mr. C. B. Wagar, a 
sextet composed of Miss F'rench, Miss 
Hanson and Messrs. Hodge, Beuneman, 
Jones and Johnson, a male quartet, an 
alto solo by Miss Hanson, a duet by Miss 
French and Miss Hanson, and a bass solo 
by Mr. J. W. C. Johnson. Mr. S. H. 
Jones will officiate as pianist. 

will «Jo To France. 

General Manager Bacon of the Min- 
nesota Iron company, is not improving 
as had been hoped, and as soon as he 
can be moved will be taken on a special 
to Chicago and thence will go to South- 
ern France, Mrs. Bacon accompanying 
him. There he hopes to recuperate. S. 
T. Pope, superintendent of the Duluth 
& Iron Range, has been placed in charge 
of the Minnesota mine during Mr. 
Bacon's illness, and will retain the posi- 
tion of manai^er until after the latter's 
return. Mr. Pope cannot fail to satis- 
factorily till this important position. 



stock Letter. 

The following dispatch is over the 
private wire of W. W. Bill & Co.: Chi- 
cago gas and New England stocks ad- 
vanced a point each today on buying by 
pools, which are giving out the informa- 
tion that there is to be still further ad- 
vance in them. Something of a shake- 
out was engineered in Wisconsin Central, 
which broke nearly two points. The 
bank stateupent, showing an increase of 
§4,2x),000 in the surplus reserve, was 
considered very favorable, but on the 
whole the market was very dull and in- 
active. Easy money and good railroad 
earnings are expected for the future. 
Wisconsin Central is said to be a buy on 
this decline, as also are the Gould stocks. 
Tne pointer is that Chicago gas will be 
a sale around 49 to 50 if it should touch 
that figure. 



To Flit ap Fire Kscapes. 

Not 25 per cent of the parlies who 
have been ordered by the fire commis- 
sioners to place fire escapes on their 
buildings have deemed it worth their 
while to comply with the order. The 
commissioners have reported the derelict 
cases to the council with the request 
that the city attorney be authorized to 
take the necessary steps to enforce the 
same or oblige the parties to show cause 
for cot obeying the law. 



The City Committeee. 

The republican city committee met 
this afternoon in the city hall for the 
purpose of instructing the judges of 
election and designating the places 
where the caucuses, also to complete 
final arrangements for the convention 
to be held on the •24th inst. The com- 
mittee was in session as The Herald 
went to press. 



New Y'ork .Stocks. 



The following are closing prices on the 
New York 8t<x:k exchange as reported bv 



W. W. Bill & Co.: 



Today. 

Chlca|». Burllnjrton Sc Qidncy 

AmerK'an 1 'otton OU 

Mi^«Juri Pucltic 13% 

Northern Pucific preferred 

ChieaKO, .Milwaukee 4 St. Paul, iaii 

Suirur Trust 6H4 

Oas Trust ..: 47^ 

Louisville Jc Nashville ,S6i« 

ChieaKO & Northwestern U 1 

Bock I.-iiiu(l 9714 

Lake Stiure ■■■'n'l'H^ 

Iteailiug' ». 3Ba; 

Richmond Terminal 21K 

Atcbistjn [_\[ 33L 

Delaware & Laclcawanna. ..'. lan^. 

LeadTnist aji^ 

Wessieru nion " 84H 

Union PaaSc "■.'■ 87 



OU.. 



• IWX 



Yester- 
dav 
lOT', 

TS'i 

'*h 
tiU'i 

46 ^. 

m% 
110^ 

97'. 
105 
3«', 
214 

;«.•■., 
137S 

ai^ 



Chicaj;ogGoHsip. 

The following dispatches are over the 
private wires of W. W. Bill, successor to 
Pressy. Wheeler & Lewis: 

Wheat: An extreme fluctuation of ij 
cent tells the -.vhole storv of our local 
market, in which the trad'ing consisted 
entirely of a scramble for sixteenths 
among scalpers. There was no news of 
importance except a higher market in 
Baltimore, where January advanced II4 
and May ;'4, said to be caused by con- 
tinental demand for shipment, although 
no actual export sales were reported. 
Ihis advance had but little effect on our 
tnarket, which closes tame at about last 
night's quotations. 

Corn: VV^eak and lower, with no note- 
worthy transactions. 

Provisions: Steady but active. Several 
prominent packers were good buyers of 
barrel, and there seems a disposition 
among traders to get away from the 
short side. 

The Minneapolis Close. 

MiNTtEAPOLi.s Jan. ll.-ClosinK .luotatlons- 
M»» u-,, '^' January. HO; Februarj-. 8u'i; 

jim'.«r^'*=~i° " ".?",: *?• ^"- 1 northern 
January. ,,%; Feb. ;•«.,; May. si',- ,jt^ 

tnjck.;»,..(aj». No. 3 northern, ianuar .' 75; 
February 7o'i; May, 79; on track, 75®7»}H. 



Strangers Within the (^ates. 
At The Spalding: J. W. Speoght, J. 
E. Poole, J. Zimmerman, T. L. Grauffer, 
New Yoi k; W. S. Jones, W. J. Howard, 
Chicago; W. S. Fonl, H. T. Wessel, C 
G. Lawrence, Oscar Scott, G. S. Beards- 
lee, St. Paul; G. A. Whiteman, Winona; 
G. Wakefield, Moorhead; Archibald 
Young, Washington; E. A. Biers, Roch- 
ester, N. Y.; W. C JVIiddleton, W. Mc- 
Gregor, Milwaukee; J. W. Shadwel!, C. 

D. Rice, G. W. Bancroft, Minneapolis. 
At the St. Louis: H. Joseph, New 

York; W. M. Nichols, Volga, S. D.; R 
Goldlache, Philadelphia; C. D. Quigly, 
G E. Aibbard, Chicago; A. Benton, Red 
Wing; M. S. Bright, Indianapolis; J. A. 
Hill, Hurley; H. W. Huntington and 
George S. Darling, Minneapolis. 

At the Merchants: T. T. Newby, Har- 
risburg. Pa.; J. C. Newick, A. Hirsch- 
man, G. F. Morris, Frank F. Price, St. 
Paul; Alex Nichols, Dayton, Ohio; W. 

E. Smith, Minneapolis. 

REA L ESTA TE. 

A Record of tlie Keal Kstate Transfers for 

34 Hours Knding at Noon. 

Likesiilo Lund company t'l W C Sar- 
gent, lot .i, blouk p:. Lijndon addition 
txDuluib 

Ol.tt (Jilbrandson to Inez A Callcina 
De'iofswii. ;ji.,T(>.15 



DISTRICT COURT. 

General Disposition of the Cates; Indtot- 
uieiits and Pleadings. 

Before Judge Ensign's court yesterday 
afternoon, case 96 was set for trial Jan. 
24. Case 120-T. H. Pressnell vs. John 
Lunden— was on trial all day. At the 
afternoon session, before Judge Stearns, 
the jury in case 101 brought m a verdict 
for the defendant. A stay of proceed- 
ings for sixty days was granted. Case 
111— J. H. Garrett vs. Chas.H. Purcell— 
was called and giv^n to the jury, who re- 
turned a sealed verdict. The grand jury 
reported no indictment against Joseph 
Agenitch, Frank Farrell, J. M. Moravity 
and William Taylor, and they were dis- 
charged from custody. The following 
indictments were found and made 
public: 

James Riley, grand larceny in second 
degree; Thomas Connors, grand larceny 
in the second degree; John Court- 
ney, robbery in first degree; T. R. 
Robinson, robbery in first degree. 
There were five bench warrants issued 
for other indicted parties whose names 
are not made public. The indicted per- 
sons were arraigned and plead as 
follows: J. B. Vallencourt, arraigned 
yesterday, withdrew his plea of guilty 
and entered a plea of guilty; Janes 
Keily, stood mute, H. S. Green was ap- 
pointed to defend him; Thomas Connors, 
not guilty; John Courtney, not guilty; 
T. A. Robinson, not guilty; C. D. Coch- 
ran was appointed to defend the last two 
prisoners. 

Antony Gisch was arraigned on an- 
other indictment charging him with 
grand larceny in the second degree. 
Through H. S. Lord, his attorney, he 
plead not guilty. 

The jury's verdict in case 111 was 
opened before Judge Stearns this morn- 
ing and was foujd to be for the plaintiff 
in the sum of $487. Case 116, A. F. Hurl- 
but vs. Mary Vail, was discontinued on 
motion of the plaintiff's attorney. Case 
114, Nazer Le Clair vs. Paul Sharvy, as 
sheriff, was tried and given to the jury. 
Mike Banack, indicted yesterday by the 
grand jury for selling liquor to minors, 
was brought into court. He plead not 
guilty and was admitted to bail in the 
sum of 860. A. N. McGindley defends 
him. Before Judge Ensign, case 120 
occupied the attention of the court all 
day. 

In the afternoon before Judge Stearns, 
Louis Murray, indicted yesterday for 
kf^eping a gambling house and suffering 
gaming tables on his premises, was 
brought into court on a liench warrant 
by 1 > puly Kenna, and on being ar- 
raigned was given until Monday to plead. 
Bail was given. C. d'Autremont will de- 
fend him. 

In case of Garrett vs. Purcell, a stay 
of thirty days was granted the plaintiff. 
The jury in case 121 was empaneled 
and the trial proceeded. 

The grand jury reported that they had 
finished all matters before them at 4 
./clock and were discharged with the 
thanks of the court. The poor farm was 
found in excellent condition and the 
city jail small, badly kept and in every 
way unfitted for use as a prison. 



Annual Meeting. 

The annual meeting of the State bank 
occured yesterday afternoon. The fol- 
lowing were elected: W. K. Rogers, 
president, M. O. Hall, cashier; C. H. 
Graves, C. H. Oppel, Jas. Watson, direc- 
tors. The only change was the with- 
drawal of J. B. Sutphin from the direc- 
torate, and the substitution of C. H. 
Oppel. 



For quick sales list your property 
with Merritt & Leddell, room 4, Fargue- 
son building. 






POWDER 

Absolutely Pure. 

This powder never varies A marvel of pur- 
ity, strength and wholea<^tnene88. More eco- 
aotuical than the ordinary kinds, and 
cannot be sold In competition with the multi- 
tude of low test, short weight, alum or phos- 
Phau- powders. Sold only In cans. Koyal 
liAKiNQ Powder Co.. 108 Wall street. N. Y. 



o 
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cc 

LU 

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cc 

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Q. 



GREIIT SIlCfilFICE SIILE 




P1[[B fOEL CO,, 



WEATHER FORECAST. 

Jan. 11. —Forecast for Duluth and 
vicinity for 24 hours comtTiencing 10 a.m. 
today : Snow ; decidedly colder. 

Observer, Signal Office. 



lu 



«ou 

3^560 
1,000 



Oeoive L Howe to Benjamin B Welles, 
e'l of ne'i and e'a I'l se », S-50-1.5 

Lillian H Mo her to John U Jones, un- 
dividd<l I, of wvi of nwi^i. SJ-oO- 5 

Koger .\I 1 ee to H K iSpeneer, lots "43 
and 44. Minnesota avenue. Upper Du- 
luth "^ , 

Lillian H .Mosher to F Elierv Fitch ' 'lin- 
divide I H of w ', of nw^j, ,'B-.50-l,i . 1 OOO 

Anson Schulte to ItobertGaertner nvi 
of se'4, a)-o'>l.i; n',i of se^i and s'* of 
nwi4, :i:j-,-ji».ls _ 

Albert Han iugton to JIary E Plumiiier 
lot ^ block B, Harrington's addition to 
Duluth j_ 

Kobert Hump to E L BraJley, li'Tof 

nw'4,:ti5;.lo ' ' 

Inez I, Calkins to Frank L Dever'n'eu 

of swi^i, :il-6()-1.5 • '^'^ 

Kobert Ga -riner to A^nns 8ch Vlte,"n4 
of seLi, j:kti»-15; n'i of swU and s'i of 

nwi4..3.{..ia-lS ^ 

J D Mahoney to Charles Copman.lot 16. 

block 4. Loudon addition to Duluth. 



A HANDSOME FRONT. 

Description of the Kelt Jt Miller Uuildin^ 
on West Superior Street. 

Plans for the Bell & Miller building 
on West Superior street are now being 
prepared by Architect E. S. Radcliffe. 
The building will be four stories on .Su- 
perior and live stories on Michigan street. 
The Hrst Superior street front stories 
will be of Arcadian redstone. The third 
will be trimmed with rock-faced brick, 
something new, and faced with Roman 
brick. The fourth story will be of 
pressed brick. The entire front will be 
fancifully carved in browustone. The 
bay windows will be copper cased, with 
stone trimmings. On each side of the 
hrst story atiU be two grey granite, bush- 
hammered columns, and the capitals will 
be of Sioux Falls jasper, handsomely 
carved. 

This will be one of the most unique 
store fronts on Superior street, and of 
most attractive and handsome design. 
The windows on both streets will be of 
the best plate glass. All the interior 
woodwork will be of oak. The plans 
will be ready in about two weeks. The 
contract has not yet been awarded. The 
building is 2.5x11.3 feet. It was intended 
originally, to build a building to be 
twice the size, but this could not be 
done. The building will cost 818,000. 



COAL 



CROSS CR[EK LEilGH. 

FREE BURNIIIG, 

AmHRAClIE i BlIUMIIIOUii, 




Will contmue Fifteen Days -until stock is re- 
duced. Cost or worth cuts no figure. WE 
MUST REDUCE, even at a great loss. 
Our low prices have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Business Existence," Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire s:ock; besides 
you would not stop to read them, Ijut will quote 
a few to give you an idea. 

$7.49 buys an elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat 
worth at least $15. ' 

$9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimn-ed Overcoat, 
worth at least $ I 8. 

The same reductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear. 
Furnishing Soods. \o reserve W^ must reduce 
our stock at least $£5,000 (thirty five thousand 
dollars.) Mild weather leaves us overstocked 
and compels us to take the loss. Call and see 
our prices. 

M. S. BURROWS & CO. 



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QC 
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CO 




THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON, Proprietor 



Strictlj Pirst-Class in all Ippointments. 




nry Maple, 

Hard Mixed, 

Slabs, 



COXIIELLSVILLE 
M CAii HOUSE. 



COKE 



OBDEfiS PfiOMPILI 0[LIV[fi[D 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



Office: Hotel St. Louis, 326 W. Superior St. 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



A. FITGER & GO'S 



Lake Superior Brewery 



}f the largrest In the State tt MId '\e»ota ou side 
of the Twii rUlp< 




PORTRAITS! 



FREE! FREE! FREE! 

A LIP[-SIZ[ PORTBAIT GIVEN AWA! WIIH Um PUBCHASE 

OF $ I 5 OR OVER. 

Commencing Monday JAN. I 3, and continuing for a short 
time only, we will give away to every customer buying goods 
amounting to $ I 5 or over a life-size Portrait of himself Ir any 
other person whom he ma/ wish, guaranteeing the work to be 
perfect in every respect, as samples in our window will prove 
This, in connection with ojr ^ 

Red Figure Mark - Down Sale 



YARD: 

Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Garfield Avenur 
Rices Point. 



Mortgage Sale. 



6.000 



400 
1.200 
1,300 



At the Bethel. 

The stereopticon illustrations of the 
"Pilgrim's Proffrees" will be resumed at 
t je Bethel loinorrow ui>,'ht. The Bethel 
•joye are preparing for the savings bank, 
which is to be opened in a few days in 
connection with the clu broom. A num- 
ber of games, tickets, cards and other 
articles for the boys' division are expected 
daily from Philadelphia. 

CITY BRIEFS. 



Chicag^o CIoNe. 

Chicago. Jan. li, i.ir, p.m. dose.- Wheat 

uy, a^i ; February a<S: May, ;jl5i. 



Builders and Tradent Again. 

The Builders and Traders Exchange is 
m a state of temporary inanition only 
In a few days the Builders and Traders 
of the Northwest hold their annual con- 
vention at St. Paul. A committee from 
here will attend for the purpose of post- 
ing up on methods, etc., after which the 
organization here will begin active opera- 
tions. The truth of the matter seems to 
be that the organization doesn't want 
an agent named George Giles to run the 
whole affai r and don't propose to let him. 
An linproveil Hre Alarm. 
Chief of Pire Department Hafey is 
niing a new device for the tire alarm 
boxes. It obviates the neceeeity of using 
a key, and thereby saves considerable 
tune. Ihe door of the box has a nickle- 
plated handle which when turned opens 
the door and rings a bell which can be 
beard a distance of two blocks. Then 
the hook can be pulled down to alarm 
tht tire department. The utility of the 
new design is apparent, and will un- 
doubtedly be put on all the boxes. 



In order to give everybody a chance 
to participate in the benefits of our 
great hoi, day reduction sale, I have 
decided U> continue it for the balance of 
this month. Don't mise the opportunity 
to get reliable goods at away-down 
prices. Sale closes positively Friday 
Jan. 31. Andrew Jacksfm, jeweler. ' 

Commercial binding and printing re- 
oeives accurate and prompt attention at 
Ihe Herald Job Rooms. 



:,ooo 

900 

I:.' tninsfers; consldenitlou "121^871 

The Syndicate Ljiiid I>eal. 

The second payment on the purchase 
money of the land pooled by M. B. Har- 
rison for sale to an English syndicate 
will be made Jan. IG. When the pool 
was made only i-'MOO was paid down, and 
this was on the Hunter & Markell addi- 
tion. On this piece of property $-20,000 
will be paid the IGthof this month, while 
hrst payments will also be made on the 
other lands involved in the deal. 

A L.wlge Installation. 
Zenith lodge. Knights of Pythias, in- 
stalled Its officers and acted on seven- 
teen applications for membership last 
night. Only four were rejected. The 
officers were installed: G. D D G C 
RadcliflFe; P. C, Simon Clark"'; c' C 
Charles E.Budden; V. C, George L. 
^^^^}r'\^-' ^- '^^ ^^arshall; K. R A S., 
J. D. Mackenzie; M of P., Alexander 
Rae; M. of E., P. J. Voss; M. at A P J 
Kraemer; I. G., John McLean; O. G.,'r 
r. Wilson. 

~ " " • 

CHURCH NOTICES. 

i-^'i^i'.^iT*''^'*''''"'/'^""-''' l^v. A. W. Rlnif- 
'an?!-^- "•• P-istor-Moriiiug scriico K)-^ ii 

which the Ct)mmuuioM of the Lord'sSuDuerwm 
occur Se..i-m,u..ctiD«rln,m lOtoS^/clocl 
Ht Which iitiie ,.ers<)U8 will be reeclvwl to 
churcli inemlKirsliip by letter or on (•mif..J i,. 
.t thHr faith in Ch}i.st^ SabbatL^JchooVar'i^- 
::»!.' »t«:-*J p. m.; eveuintr service iit 

Services will be held at the Christian Science 

P r M?s^M"?"Cf. *' ^2'^ ^^ ". anT?:*, 
at nwn speaker. Sunday school 

""?.:.';? >i'cr,t'i'. "*-" ^"^ instiiiL^Lr^o^f 

At the (-hurLh or the Sacred Heart. Fourth 
street uii.l .Second avenue west, there wm b 
8o can h.^b u>,...s« at lO:;*,, a, u>. sSl u u^ c 
t>> choir aci-oinpani,-<l by orchestrV ]n«tal hi 
He V "I r'lf/'* *"'•'•, •''^'""^ McGolrici UyM^t 

"^^l^frJ^!!^^ -. and a sttC^'^g? 

Ki'i', a'*-'m 'i, •^\ ^""nr- pastor-Lend-a-Hund. 
ilLfL ?• ^undaj sch<x)r, ;j p. m. Stereopticlni 

ifVSl'^'rV*' »';."^ "Hlfrrims Burden h"'u,is 



There was a §;^K.K) tire over in Supe- 
rior last ni.'ht, Dan W. Mills losing his 
entire stojk of meats and the store in 
which he did business. No insurance. 

A general exodus of the frail females 
from the purlieus of St. Croix avenue 
took place yesterday. They anticipate 
an attack of the grip |of the grand 
jury. 

The case against J. M. Xelson yester- 
terday for selling liquor to Indians at 
Mora, without a license, was dismissed 
by Judge Carey for want of proof, and 
the prisoner was discharged. 

The weather office received a dispatch 
from Washington this morning with or- 
ders to hoist the cold wave signal, that 
the thermometer would reach zero to- 
morrow morning There is intense cold 
at the present time in the far Xorth 
west, and it is coming this way a^'ain. 

The official program of services tomor- 
row at the Churcli of the Sacred Heart, 
on the occasion of the installation of the 
new bishop of Duluth, will be found 
under the head Church Notices. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office. Hotel St. Ixjuis: 12 m 
26 ;3p. m.,26 ;6p. m., 25 ;10p. m., 25 ; 
7 a. m., 24 ; 9a. m., 24^; 12 m., 26\ 
Maximum, 26°. Minimum, 24'. Daily 
range, 2 . 

The grand jury inspected the court 
house and jail this morning. Their re- 
port on the management of the bastile is 
favorable, but they make a number of 
suggestions as to sanitary improvements 
etc., which will be well to follow if only 
for the short time between now and the 
completion of the new jail. 

At the police court this morning there 
viras but one drunk, who paid his tine of 
m and was released. 

The ci;Be against George Booken on 
the charge of lUuaing a team was de- 
cided by Judge Davis yesterday, the de- 
fendant being proved not guilty. Com 
plainant was required to pay the costs, 
amounting to ^7.50. 

Ten or twelve first-class mechanists 
and the same number of mouldert* 
and three machinery pattern makers can 
nnd steal employment after the ir»th of 
this moutn at the Iron Bay company's 
works at West Dulutb. Address Iron 
Bay company. 



Default having been made in the payment 
ofliiesuniof three hundicd and sixtv 50-100 
dollars. (KJW) fKi-IUO) princinal and interest which 
is claimed to be due at the date of this notic-e 
ufKjn a certain inortgaKc duly executed and 
d. liveivd by Frank Do.vle.a bachelor.toJam s 
B. Howard and .\lexauder H. Davis, bearinir 
date the tenih day of November, A. D. lhi« 
and duly recorded in tlie office of the rojrister 
of deeds In and for the county of Saint Louis 
and stjite of Miunesoia, ou the UJih day of 
November A. I). IK-X, at 9<)'cl.«ck a. m., in 
b<»k '•:;»;■' of mort(fag^;s, on pajte 2fi2; and no 
action or proceedinirai. law or otherwise hav- 
iag been lnstltuto<l to recover the debt se- 
cured by said mortjra^'e. or any |)art thereof: 

Now, tberefoi-e, notice is hereby i^iven, that 
by virtue of a power of sate contained in said 
m >rt(irajrc, and pursuant to the statute in sucli 
case made and provided, the said mortKajre 
wili be foreclosed, and the premises described 
III and c-overed by said mort«a«v, viz: Lots 
uuml)ered six (6», seven (7) and eijjht {»> and 
the northeast quarter (ne"*) of the southeast 
quarter (se!*) of section numbeitHl twenty-two 
(— ), all in township No sixty-oue (till north of 
ranjfc No. twelve (12) west of the fourth (4th) 
principal meridian, in St. Louis county, and 
Slate of .viinnesota, with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances, will Ik- sold at public auction, 
to the highest bidder lor casli, to pay said debt 
and interest, and the taxes (if anyiou said prcm- 
is<'8, ind twenty-live dollars, attorney's fees 
as stipulated in and by said morttfaKe in case 
of foreclosure, and the disbursements allowed 
by law; which sale will be made by the sheriff 
of sa'd St. Louis county, at the front door of 
thecourt house, in tlie city of Duluth, in said 
county and state, on the aith day 
of January, A. D. IWM), at 10:30 o'clock a m. on 
that day, subject to redemption at any time 
within one year from the day of sale, as pro- 
vided by law. *^ 
Dated DecemberlSth, A. D. 1889. 

J.iMES B. Howard, 
and 
„ ... „ Ai.BXANDEB H. Davis, 

K. N. Marble, Mortgagees 

Attorney. 
Dec. 14-2I-a<. Jan. 4-11-18-35. 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 

—AND— 

INSURANCE. 

Rooms I, 2, Exchange BIdg. 
DULUTH, - - MINN. 



UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



Northern Piwsiflc Short l.lne. 



D0LDTH TO SUPERIOR. 



Gives you more than all the profit, but, as In the oast we arp 

t^h° Rp§t'° ^%''°^l^°.^7 ^"^ LIBERAL, alwayTgiving y'ou 
?u^i?^S°°^^^**^^ LCiWEST prices, and something well 
worth having to remember us by besides. 




'^wDfim 



WHOLESALE. 



I Leave 
I Dulutb 



Except Sunday. . 
Except Sunday. . 
Except Sunday . . 

Daily 

Dally 

Except Sunday.. 

Daily 

Daily 

Daily 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday. . , 

Daily 

Uailv 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 



6;iO am 
T % am 

8 56 am 

10 00 am 

11 35 am 
110 pm 
216 pm 

3 25 pm 
3»0pm 

4 00 pm 

4 35 pm 

5 40 pm 
46 pm 
7 16 pm 

9 35 pm 
11 10 pm| 



Leave 



Arrive 



W. Sup'r Superior 



4.5 am 
7 55 am 
!1 10 am 

10 15 am 

11 50 am 
138 pm 

2 30 pm 

3 40 pm 

3 45pra 

4 15 pm 

4 60 pm 

5 55 pra 
7 00 pm 
7 30 pm 
9 45 pm 

U27pm 



<>53 am 
8(13 am 
9 17 am 

10 23 am 

11 57 am 
135 pm 
337 pm 

3 47 pm 

4 35 pm 
4 hi pm 
(KJ pm 
to7 pm 



RETAIL. 




115 3 pm 



eirpKRiOK *o Dtri,DTH. 



Leave i Leave 
Superior W. Sup'r 



Notice to Cofitiactofs. 



Daily 

Except Sunday... 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 
Except Sunday. .. 

Daily 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Daily 

Except Sunday. . . 

Dally 

Except Sunday... 






'. JD am 

8*10 am 
9 35 am 

10 45 am 

11 05 am 
13 35 pm 

1 46 pm 

3 60 pm 

4 06 pm 
6 06 pm 



610 pm 

7 30 pm 

11 45 pm 



6 45 am 

7 07 am 

7 40 am 

8 17 am 

9 33 am 
10 55 am 
11 15 am 
12 43 pm 

1 63 pm 

3 00 pm 

4 16 pm 
513 pm 
610 pm 
617 pm 
7 30 pm 

1153 pm 



Arrive 
Duluth 

7 05 am 
733 am 

7 65 am 

8 35 am 

9 48 am 
11 10 am 
11 30 am 

100 pm 
2 07 pm 
315 pm 

4 30 pm 

5 30 pm 
36piD 

6 35 pm 

7 45piu 
13 10 am 



ERS k WHIPPLE 



One of the best lists of property to 
be had in the city. 



Scaled proposals will be received until 8 
o clock p. m., January 30th, 1890, by E. R. Jef- 
ferson, chairman of coniniittce on court liouse 
and county jail, for the cell work in the new 
county jail, in acc-ordance with plans, speclU- 
catums drawn by O G. Tniphauen, architect, 
on llle at the office of the county auditor. 

Bidders will specify what quality and 



SU Paul U Dalnth Short Line. 
Duluth to West 

Superior •636 t8 00 8 46 'lOSO 'laoOam 

Duluth to West 

Superior *2 40 4 46 •+6 30 •6 60 •+10 00 pm 

West Superior 

to Dulutb +»610 ^756 9 30^1016 *11 15 am 

West Superior 

to Dulutb ♦3 00 +240 3 50 ^6 46 •+6 10 ^9 10 pm 

•Dally. +West Duluth only. 

Leave Duluth dally for Spirit Lake— 9:00 am, 
,;^30p m; returning' at 10:06 am and tpm. 



1 20 Acres 


in 


30-5 1. 


■ 13. 


80 Acres 


n 


26-51- 


14. 


200 Acres 


'n 


9-50- 


14. 


20 Acres 


n 


7-50. 


14. 


35 Acres 


n 


17-50- 


14. 


1 1 Acres " 


n 


30-50- 


14. 


320 Acres 


n 


14-51- 


15. 


360 Acres i 


n 


4-51- 


15. 



1 60 Acres 


in 


9-50- 


15. 


40 Acres 


in 


21-50- 


15. 


1 40 Acres 


in 


33-50- 


15. 


320 Acres 


in 


6-50- 


15. 


40 Acres 


in 


19-50- 


15. 


80 Acres 


in 


20-50- 


15. 


280 Acres 


in 


1 7-49- 


15. 



-:- 1410 ACHES IN 

Scattered in different sections in bodies of from 
40 to 600 acres. Tho above bodies May be sep- 
arated to suit purchaser. 




^/ 




St. Paul tt Duluth Railroad. 



will also 



and submit sample of same. They 
submit drawings or samples of locks and bars 
they propose to use, and all mechanical de- 
vices connected with the cells. 

Eacli proposal must be accompanied with a 
check for tl%e hundred dollars to be forfeited 
t<j M Ixtuls county. In the event that the pro- 
posal which sai.l check accompanies 8ht.il be 
accepted l.y the county c-ommissloners, and 
that the iKjrson making the proposal shall fall 
to comply with its terms 

Address all i)rfjpo8al8 to E. R. Jefferson, In 
care of county auditor, Duluth. Minn. For 
furthir information apply to 

JOHV F. SCHI.1EUNK8, 

Superintendent, Duluth, Minn. 
1 he commissioners reserve the riifht to re- 
ject any ami all iiroposals 
Dec 14-18-31 -iM-S^Jan 1-4-8-11-15-18-23. 




lnT)uluth"' ''° *"■• "«'"'«"!f*''y« l>tst Sunday 



I offer a great bargain in acres on St. 
Louis river, near Fond du Lae. 

J. A. Bo<5o.s. 

In order to give everybody a chance 
to participate in the benefits of our 
great holiday reduction sale, I have 
decided to continue it for the balance of 
this month. Don't miss the opportunity 
to get reliable goods at away down 
prices. Sale closes positively Friday, 
Jan. 31. Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 



SCIENTIFICAMERICAN 

ESTABLISHED 1845. 



la the oldpst and mnrt popular acientlflc and 
mechanica! paper p\itillshed and haa Ihe largeat 
circulation of any (wpir of Ita claaa In the world 
Fully illustrated. Bpst class i>t W<iod RnirraT- 
Inita. l»ut)li.«hcd weekly, ^iend for apecimen 
5?i;i;..^.'^5'' *^ " y^'^'- •■'''"'■ months' trial, |L 
UDNN & CO., Publish EHS. 361 Broadway, N T 

ARCHITECfslt BUILDERO 
Edition of Scientific American. O 

A irreat. success. Each ls.»ne contains colored 
llthOKraphlc plates of country and city residen- 
ces or public buildlnvs. Numerous engraTlngs 
and full plant and speclOratlons for the use of 
such aa contemplate liiilldlnp. I'rire t2.5<) a vear, 
Kcts.acopy. UL'N.N A CO.. Pubusbkhs. 

may be aecor- 
|ed by apply- 
Idk to Mltnn 
A Co., who 
hare had oTsr 
40 ypara' experience and hare made over 
lOO.lXW applicatlona for Ameriran and Kor- 
elcn patents. Send for Handbook. Corraa- 
pondance strictly oouadeutlaJ. 

TRADE MARKS. 

In pan* your mark Is not registered In the Pat- 
ent oniie, apply to Mcsn a to., aiid procure 
Immediate protection. Send for Handbook. 

C» PVR I (HITS for books, cbaita, mape, 

•to., quickly procured. Addreaa 

BICNN & CO., Patent Sellclcare. 

QxmaAi. orncs: Ki Bsoauwat, N. T 



eave Duluth 

Arrive St. Paul... 
Ar Minneapolis.. 

Ar Stillwater 

Ar Milw^auliee 

Ar ChicajTO 

ArSt. Louis 

Ar Kansas City... 



1 s 


t-i 


cm 
dal 
oep 
day 


S 




li 


.;?sB', 


<< 


8 00 am 


210 pm 


2 3Dpm 


6 65 pm 


2 65 pm 


7 20 pm 


aaopm 


7 05 pm 


4 15 am 


6 45 am 


7 to am 


9 .30 am 


5 06 pm 


6 06 pm 


4 45 pm 


4 45 pm 






lOOOpm 

6 55 am 

7 16 am 

7 00 am 
+7 05 pm 
■+7 00 pm 

am 

8 45 am 




4 




lAiliiition 



Can be bought, 
terms and sure 
1-2 of N W 



Conlains over 700 lots. Easy 
to make a handsome profit--N 



. +Kxcept Sunday— to other points dally. 



^f Tthem Pacific Railroad. 



Dlnlngr Cars on Pacific 
Express Trains. 



; Licavo Arrive 
Duluth Duluth 




Fergus 



Pacific Express (limited) for 
Farfro, Helena, Butte, Ta- 
coma, Seattle and Portland. 
Grand Forks. Grafton, Wln- 
nlpeir 

Dakota Express, foi 
Falls, wahpeton, "argro, 
Jamestown and intermediate 
points 

Chicajfo Express, for Ashland, 
Milwaukee, Chlcaifo and all 
Wisconsin Central and Mil- 
waukee. I.,ake Shore & West- 
ern points 



Dally. 



Dally 



3.30 pm K.2S pm 



7.15 pm 



4.00 pm 



7.G6 am 



icaoair 



All trains daily. Tbrourh sleeper fron 
Duluth on Dakota express !eavln»r at 7:15 r 
m . Free Colonist Sleepers ar5 run on Paclfli 
Express leavlnfr Duluth at 3:30 



Throug'h sleeper 
sivln» 
run 
I p. m. 
JNO. C. KOHINSON, 



Ticket AjTcut. L'nloii Depot. 



Duluth. .South Shore and Atlantic. 



LeavesDuluth dally 9301 

Arrives Kepuljlic, Mich. 



pa 

. , , . 8 37,am 

Arrives Ishpeiuing-, Mich 725aii? 

Arrives Neg-au nee, M ioh 7 35 am 

Arrives Marquette, Mich 805 am 

An Ives Sauit Sto. Marie, Mich 1 36 pm 

Arrives Ottawa, Ont 1145am 

Arrives Montreal, Que 3c>lpm 

Arrives Boston, Mass 8 30 am • 

AirivosNew York, N. Y 7 00 am ' 

Arrives Detroft. Mich lllUami 



LOT - IN - BLM - S3, - ENOION, 

Cheap and easy terms. $ I 50 cash, $ I 75 April 
St, $175 July 1st, $175 Oct. 1st, $175 April 
1st, I 89 I. 

TWO lOTS 01 FOURTH STfiEET. 

$4000. One-half cash^ Sure to be worth $6000 
to $8000 before long 



MONEY TO LOAN. GOOC ' PURCHASE MONEY M O RT- 
GAGES BOUGHT, F IRE INSURANCE CARE - 
FULLY WRITTEN. 



■• ^ 



A 



MYERS k WHIPPLE 



i 

-.1 



WANTED-Immediiitely a jflrl for general i 
housework. Apply 610 Stenson block. 



First National Bank Building. 





■t-^ 





1 




ACRES 


Near 


Short Line Park on railroad. 


E. 


C. HOLLIDAY, 




326 West Superior Strett. 


'-- 1 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD 





E. 


FOK BARGAINS 

—SEE— 

C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 W. Superior Street. 
HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILOINQ. 


I 



VOL. 7; NO. 240. 



DULUTH, MINN., MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 1890. 



piiicB thb:e:£ cents. 



\ 



Do you Want to Bo™ Money? 



We can let you have it and without delay. 

MONEY ON HAND 

Provided you have sufficient security. 



Our Rates are the Lowest 




■ i W ■■ / 



NM^W^R 



Applications for loans wanted at once in 

DULUTH, m] DULUTH OR WEST SUPEBIOB 



Improved or Unimproved Property taken. 



s 



URGE - OR - SMULL - 




) 



We have on hand $800, $ I 600 or $2400 

for a 

SNAP IN REAL ESTATE 



All cash. 



k^M^i, Acfgs an:! kmm Property a Specialty. 

Call and see what we have. 



~r-\ 



FIRE 



INSURANCE. 



1 



The best Foreign and American Companies rep- 
resented. Policies correctly written. 



Stryker, Manley & Buck, 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



-I_ 



|] 




L BUGS -1- 



\ 



Mr. E. B. Patten solicits the attendance of the 
ladies of Duluth at an 



EXHIBITION - AND - SALE 



OF 






\ 



Rare Antique & Modero ]\iM aod Peisian Hup & Carpels 



AT- 



28 East Superior Street, 



ON 



■^ mm 



\ 



Wednesday and Thudaj, Jan. 15 and 16 



Each day at 1 I A. M. and 3 P. M. 



V 

I 



This collection is just cleared from the Chicago 

custom house and is 



DIRECT - FROM - CONSTANTINOPLE. 



The colorings are fme, and everyone interested 

in these rare and interesting fabrics 

is invited to attend the sale. 



ly 



Mr. Patten's instructions from the Constanti- 

nople shipper are to close every 

piece, if possible. 



ONLY 2 DAYS 



I 

]. 



. 



• 



r^ i t -i,»i.-j H I 1 



LAST EOITION, 



THE SilOERII CVCLOKE. 



Seventy are Killed or Wounded 

by a Cyclone in the 

South. 



Full List of the Dead; Two 

Hundred Houses Were 

Ruined. 



St. Louis' Loss of Life and 
Poperty Frightful; Else- 
where. 



Cairo, 111., Jan. 13. — The tornado last 
night struck the east side of the city of 
Clinton, Ky., demolishing ftfty-five 
houses, killing eleven people and wound- 
ing tifty-three. The killed as ascer- 
tained are: 

J. A. Khoads and two children, Mrs. 
Wm. Boae, Burnett Bone, Walter Nance, 
John W. Oaddie and an infant child of 
Judge E. C Hodges, and one other not 
yet identified. 

The wounded are: Judge E. C. 
Hodges, wife and two children; (1. K. 
Gwynne, wife, child and father; C. W. 
Voorhees, child and two relatione, names 
unknown; Rev. N. W. Little, wife and 
two children; D. Stubbletield, and sev- 
eral members of his family, though not 
seriously; Mrs. Fostyr and two children; 
Mrs. J. A. Rhodes and one child, the 
latter will die; A. L. Emerson and two 
children; A. F. Justis and one child; 
Wm. Bone and two children; W. F. 
Boone; Mrs. John W. Gaddie and one 
child; Mr. Jackson; Robert Johnson, 
Sr., Robert Johnson, Jr., (latter will die); 
W. R, Nanoe, wife and child, and others 
whose names could not be ascertained. 

Assistance was sent from here last 
nijjht. The storm also visited WicklitT, 
Ky, doing considerable damage to prop 
erty, but no loss of life. 

AT ST. LOUIS. 



One Hundred and I'ifty Hi>u»et« Blown 
Down; .Many Killed. 
St. Louis, Jan. 13. — All along the path 
of last evening's terrible storm large 
crowds gathered this morning to view 
the^ruins. House No, 922 Mound street, 
St. Louis, a two-story brick, where three 
people were killed, was surrounded by 
an immense throng who gazed on the 
scene of desolation with feelings akin to 
awe. This house was totally demolished. 
Matthew McCuUom, who occupied the 
first Hoor, was taken out dead a few min- 
utes atter the storm passed. Mrs. Con- 

ners, with two daughters and a neigh- 
bor's boy and girl named Joe and Ida 
Weaver were on the second floor. Mrs. 
Conners and the Weaver boy were in- 
stantly killed and their bodies were dug 
out of the wreck by firemen. 

All along the line of the storm bricks 
were torn off outside of buildings and 
carried for blocks and dashed into the 
windows, in many instances injuring 
those who chanced to Ije sitting within 
reach. The number of buildings which 
ware damaged will probably reach 150, 
with loss ranging all the way from $100,- 
000 to §300,000. 

Following is a list of injured so far as 
known: Miss Maggie Oonoers, Miss 
Mamie Connors, Wm. Brady; Mrs. Rob- 
erts, Mrs. Charles Miller and child, Mr. 
Charles Miller, employees of Verheyden 
Lumber company; Mrs. McQuade, Mrs. 
J. Ryan and daughter, Mrs. Benjamin 
Vertield, M. J. Ackerman, unknown lady, 
James McCosh, Wenzel Henzel, Frank 
Kohler, all more or less injured. A large 
forto of workmen are clearing up the 
debris. 

AT DETROIT 



atach Damage was Done; The Ossifrage 
Blown Afthore. 

Detkoit, Mich., .Jan. 13. — A terrific 
storm has raged here since last evening. 
In the night it was accompanied by 
heavy rain, but later it turned colder 
and the rain ceased while the wind 
gained violence. Several trees were 
blown dow n in the heart of the city and 
signs innumerable were found in the 
streets this morning. Several great win- 
dows were blown in by the force of the 
gale also. This morning is the coldest 
experienced so far this winter, and there 
is slight fall of snow. 

The steamer Ossifrage which was in 
winter quarters, was torn from her moor- 
ings and blown up the river to Belle Isle, 
where she stranded. Nearly all telephone 
wires are down, causing much inconven 
ience to the public. Telegraphic com- 
munication also is seriously interrupted. 

Many Deslitute are .Starving^. 

St. Lolis, Mo., Jan 13.— Dispatches 
from different portions of Kansas re- 
port a blizzard in that state. At 
Wichita eighteen inches of snow fell and 
for a hundred miles west the storm 
raged with fury and the vhole country 
is covered with snow to the depth of a 
foot or more. Railroad trains are stuck 
at several places and traffic is practically 
suspended. Intense suffering is reported 
in destitute districts in several of the 
western counties. There are thirty or 
more cars of provisions at the town of 
Liberal en route to sufferers, but that 
is fifty-two miles away from the starving 
people and nobody is willing to take the 
chances of freezing by hauling the 
freight in wagons. 

PevuliarltieH of Weather. 

Washington, Jan. 13.--The storm 
which was central in the Northwest 
yesterday, moved northeastward rap- 
jdly with great energy, passing over cen 
tral valleys and lake regions attended by 
severe gales and destructive local storms; 
unusual warm southerly winds prevailed 
east of storm center, while a cold wave 
extended southward over the Mississippi 
valley to the Gulf coast, the change in 
temperature in twelve hours ranging 
from 40 to 50 , from Illnois south to 
Gulf coast. The temperature is now be- 
low the freezing point in northern 
Lousiana and Texas, it is above 00" 
from Florida northward to New Y'ork. 



CaaseH a ColliHion. 

Toledo, Jan. 13. During a heavy gale 
last night a freight car was blown from 
the siding at Custer Station, on the C, 
H. & D. railroad, thirty-four miles south 
of Toledo. It was blown upon the main 
track and then driven three miles north, 
where it collided with the southbound 
passenger train leaving here at midnight. 



The engine, baggage and mail car of the 
train were wrecked, and both engineer 
and fireman injured, but not fatally. 
Passengers in the Pullman were not 

awakened. 

In KanitaM and Missouri. 
Kansas City, Mo., Jan. 13. — Dis- 
patches this morning from points in 
Kansas and Missouri state that the 
storm has ceased. No human lives were 
lost in the blizzard so far as reported, 
nor was any live stock frozen to death. 
This morning the weather has moder- 
ated. 



A Territic Mtorni. 

PiTTSBUKCi, Jan. 13.— Terrific wind 
B orm passed over the city earlythis morn- 
ing doing considerable damage and pros- 
trating wires in every direction. Com- 
munication east for a time was entirely 
cut off, but it has now been established, 
although the telegraph is still badly 
crippled. 



IOWA POLITICS. 



The General Aiuteuibly Convened Today : 
ItH Party Composition. 

Dk-s Moines, Iowa, Jan. 13.— The 
twenty-third general assembly conrened 
at noon today. The city is crowded with 
politicians interested in the initial 
movements of a session which, apart 
from the fact that a United States sena- 
tor is to be elected, promises to be a 
peculiarly exciting one. 

The COD' position of the senate is 
twenty-eight republicans, twenty demo- 
crats, one union labor and one indepen- 
dent. The latter. Senator Harnett, being 
in harmony with the republicans on all 
questions excepting those relating to 
prohibition. The membership of the 
house comprises fifty republicans, forty- 
five democrats, four independents and 
one union labor. The independents, who 
come from hitherto republican districts, 
are exi)ected to work with the republi- 
cans long enough to enable the latter to 
elect the speaker and organize the 
house. 

All the interest and excitement this 
morning centers on the election of the 
officers for the senate and house, and 
this out of the way, the senatoriarl fight 
will commence in earnest. 

Governor James E. Campbell's message 
to the assembly is comparatively brief 
and touches upon a number of subjects 
of state and local interest. He recom- 
mends that home rule be restored to all 
cities as speedily as ptossible, and enters 
into details as to this need at Cincinnati. 
He strongly commends the system of 
ballot reform commonly called the 
Australian system, and sketches briefly 
the success with which it has met in 
other countries and states. The argu- 
ment that it would be a hardship to 
illiterate voters is substantially answered 
and the conclusion reache<l that public 
sentiment is not educated to the point 
and any attempt to enact such a law 
now would probably prove futile. 

On the question of cheaper school 
books the governor says: "Popular edu- 
cation is the foundation of freedom and 
prosperity, and knowledge should be fur- 
nished at the lowest possible cost. The 
state builds school houses, provides 
teachers aud controls every detail of 
education save furnishing books. Is 
there any sound reason why it should 
not assume this function also? Recent 
experience in Indiana shows that school 
books equal to those in use here are de- 
livered to children at 50 per cent of their 
former cost. Other states have tried the 
experiment with as much success. 
There seems to be a fact that 
school books can be furnished either 
by direct publication by the state or 
by contract at less than present prices. 
It is not necessary to inveigh against 
capital for monopolizing this form of 
publication. It is sufficient to ascertain 
whether books can be furnished more 
cheaply by the state without involving 
it in material liability." 

lie favorfc the abolition of the office of 
commissioner of railroads and tele- 
graphic, and thinks his duties could be 
better performed by the railroad com- 
mission, provided there be any necessity 
for state supervision of railroads. 



Ohio'it Oovernor. 

CoLiMBUs, Jan. 13.— Governor Camp- 
bell was inaugurated today, amid the 
huzzas of a great gathering of the 
faithful and unterrified from the four 
quarters of the state. A delegation of 
thirty members of the famous Iroquois 
club of Chicago, with the regulation 
badges on their breasts which were worn 
at the inauguration of President Cleve- 
land in 1885, arrived on an early train 
and were given a hearty reception. The 
Duckwortle club of Cincinnati aud crack 
clubs from Cleveland and Toledo were 
als<j among the early arrivals. The 
formal ceremonies of inauguration were 
preceded by a grand parade. The city 
is elaborately decorated. 



THE REHEARING. 



Arguing on a Motion for New Trial for 
the Cronin Murderers. 

Chicago, Jan. 13. — The scenes of the 
Cronin trial were re-enacted in some 
degree in Judge McConnellii courtroom 
this morning, a large crowd having been 
drawn to the place by the fact that the 
argument upon the motion tor a new 
trial for the convicted men was upon the 
calendar. The representatives of the 
state however, urged a continuance on 
the ground that the affidavits upon 
which the application was based had 
been filed as lat« as Friday last, and that 
sufficient time had not been given for 
examination. It is contended that the 
verdict was the result of passion and 
prejudice OD the part of the jury, that 
the evidence was totally insufficient to 
justify the verdict, and that all the de- 
fendants should have been acquitted. 
Eminent lawyers say that the record is 
absolutely free from error. 



IS AN OBJECT LESSON, 



And One that Water-Front and 

Other Owners Should 

Heed. 



Indians Have a Grand Pow- 

Wow at Ashland to Get 

Payment. 



The non-utilization of Minnesota 
Point is expensive to Duluth. As was 
maintained at the recent citizens' meet- 
ing Duluth has lost several docks and 
manufactories, only because there was 
not just the right land within the city 
limits which could be used advanta- 
geously for these purposes outside of 
Minnesota Point, that was not held at a 
figure that precluded purchase. It is 
not to be controverted that owners of 

bay front property have an undeniable 
right to hold their property at any figure 
that pleases them, but that these high 
prices have driven capital to other loca- 
tions cannot be denied. 

A. W. Maltby, president of the 
Silver Creek and Morris Coal 
Company of Chicago was in 
the city Saturday, looking for a site upon 
which to build a large coal dock and an 
extensive manufactory that would em- 
ploy several hundred men. Some time 
ago the Morris company, at a meeting of 
the directors held in Chicago, decided to 
seek a location in Duluth for a coal 
dock and factory. Correspondence took 
place between Duluth landowners and 
the company. The company decided to 
look to Duluth alone as the 
proper location for these new en- 
terprises. Mr. Maltby was sent 
to Duluth lasL week. He took 
a careful survey of dockage property and 
decided to locate in no place but the 
lower bay. Negotiations were opened 
with Bay Front owners, who would not 
sell at what he believed were figures 
plenty high enough. 

"At a meeting of our company," said 
Mr. Maltby, "it was decided to establish 
a dock and an important manufactory in 
Duluth. We considered this the best 
possible center from which to reach the 
Northwest. I came here intending to 
buy four acres, the area required. We 
have been kept out by high prices. 
West Superior owners wanted us to 
come there, but we preferred Duluth. I 
don't know what will be done, but we 
will probably make no move for an out- 
side locntion within the next six months 
or year." 



A CHIPPEWA POWWOW. 



They're at I'eace — But. 

Bebi^in, Jan. 13.— Herr Von Levetzow. 
president of the reichstag, reported to 
that body today that the Emperor 
yesterday, in receiving the presidential 
bureau, said it afforded him great 
pleasure and satisfaction tha» the gen- 
eral political situation appeared to fully 
assure the world's peace. His majesty 
said that in order to preserve peace it 
was necessary that Germany, in view of 
her geographical position, should not 
fail to maintain her military armaments 
in the highest state of efficiency and to 
incessantly provide for her army and 
navy. 

"Little Saltie Waterik" 
New York, Jan. 13.— David Hender- 
son the well-known theatrical manager, 
and manager Gilmore had an interview 
this morning with Superintendent 
Gerr,y of the society for Preven- 
tion of Cruelty to Children, re- 
garding the latter's pohibition of the 
employment of twenty-four children 
aged from ten to twelve jears, to sing 
"Little Sallie Waters" in the ballet of 
Bluelieard which opens tonight at Nihlos. 
It was urged that no such prohibition 
had been enforced in Chicago, Washidg- 
ton, Boston, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Balti- 
more and other places, but Gerry was 
inexorable. It is probable that the 
managers will maintain the feature of 
che show. 



The Ked aten I'reparing to Move Legally 
for Tlieir Kiglits. 

Ashland, Jan. 13. — Saturday morning 
a council of the Chippewas convened in 
this city. The following were the ten 
tribes represented: Bad River, Flam- 
beau, Court de Orelles, White Earth,On- 
tonagon, Cloquet, Mille Lacs, Grand 
Portage, Leech Lake and Oak Point. 
All of these bands are located in Min- 
nesota, Wisconsin and Michigan and rep- 
resents what remains of the once famous 
Chippewas. 

It was expected that they would come 
with all their war togs and feathers. 
Consequently thore were a large number 
of curious people at the depots to see the 
procession. But the delegates arrived 
as any other set of delegates would ar- 
rive —plug hats and canes — and the gen- 
eral plans of the council was much the 
same as a full fledged political conven- 
tion. The familiar war whoops did not 
show up until after the free lunch trail 
was discovered. 

The council was called for the specific 
purpose of authorizing parties to secure 
money which they claim is due them 
from the government under treaties 
made from IUSI to 1854. They have ceded 
all their lands and claim that something 
like $ia\000 is due them under the 
treaties effected during this time. It is 
stated that they have copies of the 
original treaties. They have been care- 
fully preserved and handed down several 
generations. 

They will send a delegation to Wash- 
ington immediately, and I am inclined 
to think that they will get the money. 
They have attorneys of good substantial 
financial backing. The lauds secured by 
the government in the treaties from 18^17 
to 1854, are very valuable, including the 
mines of the Gogebic range and the mill- 
ions of pine in northern Wisconsin, 
Michigan and Minnesota. A large 
amount of valuable real estate in Du- 
luth is now in litigation, growing out of 
a deed made by Chief Buffalo. It seems 
that his only daughter fell in love and 
was married to B. G. Armstrong, who 
was then representing Hudson Bay 
company. Their marriage was 
strongly opposed by the old chief at 
first, but subsequently he became very 
fond of his white man son-in-law, and de- 
pendent upon him in all his important 
negotiations. As a legacy he deeded 
him that part of Duluth now in litiga- 
tion. Shortly after the old chief's death 
an attempt was made to poison Arm- 
strong by certain other men who wanted 
the property. He was made nearly blind 
from the effects of it. He went East 
for medical assistance and while there 
the property was shipped away from him. 
Armstrong still lives here. 



CULLYFORD - GORDON NUPTIALS. 

A Qniet Wedding of Well-Known People 

at W. K. 8t4>ne'8 Renidence. 

At 2 o'clock this afternoon Mr .Thomas 
Cullyford and Miss Annie Gordon were 
united in marriage at the residence of 
W. R. Stone, 110 West Third street, who 
is a brother-in-law of the bride. Rev. 
Wm. M. Barker of St. Pauls Episcopal 
church performed the ceremony in the 
presence of the immediate relatives and 
':ix or eight very intimate friends of the 
contracting parties. 

The bride was dressed in a traveling 
costume and Mr. and Mrs. Cullyford left 
at 4 o'clock for Chicago, where they will 
be joined one day later by W. R. Stone 
and wife who leave tomorrow. The par- 
ty will tour through Mexico, Florida and 
Cuba and some of the principal Gulf 
and Atlantic states and will be absent 
about two months. 



Turkiith RngH. 
Rare designs, exquisite colorings, un- 
equalled durability. These are what 
make a good oriental rug, the most desir- 
able thing on earth for your parlor, 
hall or diningroom. A fine lot will be 
sold at 28 East Superior street, Wednes- 
day and Thursday. See ad on first 
page. 

I can sell a few choice properties on 
Central and Grand avenueson small cash 
payments to good parties. 

John D. Gill, 
over Postoffice, Duluth. 



^rr 



^t^ta 



Mia 



.^Mm 



BOE ING D EAD. 

The Alleged Owner of Duluth '« Canal Dies 
of the Grip. 
Detroit, Jan. 13. —William Boeing, a 
prominent citizen and capitalist, died 
here Saturday of pneumonia. He had 
just returned from an eastern trip. 

William Ba'ing was well known in 
Duluth and has extensive interests here. 
He has a number of suits pending in the 
present term of the district court which 
will be more or less affected by his 
death. His ridiculous attempt at stop- 
ping navigation here last October is now 
a matter of comic history. M. H. 
Alworth is his representative here, but 
he is in Detroit at present where he 
went on business with Mr. Boeing. The 
latter was about fifty years of age. He 
was taken ill while in New York a few 
days ago and died on reaching home. 
He owned the vacant lot next The 
Spalding hotel. 

ALIVE IN A COFFIN. 



Sensational Story Told by a Milwaulcee 

Woman; Almost a Premature Burial. 

Milwaukee, Jan. 13.— There is much 
talk about a case of suspended anima- 
tion that occurred in the city a few days 
ago, and which resulted in a living 
woman being pronounced dead, dressed 
in grave clothes and placed in a coffin. 

The wife of a mechanic named Cole- 
man became unconscious and to all ap- 
pearances ceased to live. Two physicians 
who were in attendance pronounced her 
dead, aud an undertaker furnished a 
coffin in which the form of the uncon- 
scious woman was laid. 

It had been arranged that the funeral 
should take place on the third day after 
Mrs. Coleman's death, and she was 
placed in the coffin on the evening of 
the same day on which she had sank 
into insensibility. On the second day, 
however, when she had been in the 
coffin nearly twenty-four hours, the 
watchers observed signs of returning 
life, and in great excitement posted off 
after a physician. The revival of the 
woman was gradual, so that she was 
spared the shock of waking to find her- 
self in a coffin. She did not become en- 
tirely conscious at any time, however, 
and within a few hours death really en- 
sued. The funeral was held yesterday. 

A GO OD RE CORD. 

Montana Mattes a Record That Beats tlie 
I>akotaH, Iter Treasurer Reports. 

Helena, Mont., Jan. 13. -Montana 
commences the year without a dollar of 
indebtedness, and with a cash balance 
in the treasury. State auditor has com- 
pleted his report to the governor for last 
year and has placed it in hands of the 
printer. The total assessment of the 
state is 879,376,044, an increaes of nearly 
§12,000,000 over the previous year. 

During the year warrants drawn on 
the general fund amounted to §226,806, 
and on Jan. 1,' with no warrants out- 
standing, the cash balance in that fund 
was $:i3,251. Estimated expenses of 
state government for this year are $320,- 
000, while with taxes and licensfs the 
state can raise a revenue of over 8400,000 
without legislation. The outlook of 
statehood is very Hatterinc. 

FOUR TH OUSA ND OUT. 

A Great L.<><-k-Oul in the Massachusettit 
Boot and Shoe Trade. 

Haverhill, Mass., Jan. 13.— The 
threatened lock-out of the employes of 
the boot and shoe manufactories went 
into effect this moruing, and nearly four 
thousand men, women and children find 
themselves without work in the worst 
season of the year. 

This step has been taken by the man- 
ufacturers to forestall an anticipated de- 
mand for an advance of wages, each 
member of the association pledging 
85,000 toward the expense of carrying on 
the light. The employes are very bitter 
and declare that they will not return to 
work until the bosses make an uncondi- 
tional surrender. Should the trouble 
last for any length of time nearly ten 
thousand people will be affecied, directly 
and indirectly. 

Honor a Cardinal. 

Chaklkston, S. C, Jan. 13.— People 
of all denominations white and colored, 
rich and poor, joined together today in 
doing honor to cardinal Giblwns, who 
had purveyed from Baltimore to officiate 
at the laying yesterday afternoon of the 
corner-stone of the new Cathedral. The 
reception, which was of a semi-public 
character, took place at the city hall, 
the use of which had been granted by 
the mayor and council, and for hours 
a steady stream of people poured 
through the building. The presenta- 
tions were made by Bishop Northrop; 
the cardinal giving each visitor a hand- 
shake and a smile. Tomorrow his e-ni- 
nence, accompanied by Father Leeson his 
provincial leaves for New Orleans. He 
will be escorted a portion of the journey 
by a large delegation of priests and 
laymen. 

Tlie Prince Presides. 

London, Jan. 1.3. — The Prince of 
Wales presided today over a subscrip- 
tion dinner, having for its object the es- 
tablishment of a "National Leprosy 
Fund." It is intended to raise a large 
sum of money and apply the proceeds to 
the endowment of two studentships. 
One student to make the United King- 
dom and the remainder of Europe his 
field of investigation; and the other to 
go abroad and study the disease in 
India, China and the Colonies. 

Two Instantly Killed. 
Fort Wayne, Ind., Jan. 13. — Last even- 
ing after the limited express east on the 
Pennsylvania road had passed Wheeler 
Station, two brothers, Henrj- and Martin 
Reimus, employed on the road as section 
hands, started to run a hand car to 
Hobart. They were run down by a light 
locomotive that was running backward. 
Both men were instantly killetl. They 
leave large families. 

A Spark in Tinder. 

Marseille.s, Jan. 13. — The crew of u 
French steamer at this port maltreated 
a German sailor who had been sent 
ashore to lighten a hawser of his steamer 
because of a comiug storm. Complaints 
about the affair made to the French 
officers proved futile and the German 
consul has complained about the matter 
to the authorities at Berlin. 



A Ripper Murder. 

Pesth, Jan. 13.— The body of a prosti- 
tute has been found at Gruenne, near 
Presburg, with her throat cut and other- 
wise mutilatetl. The crime resembles 
those committed recently in the White 
Chapel district of London. 

Ten Dead in a Day. 
Chicago, Jan. 13.- -The Evening News 
reports ten deaths in Chicago within the 
past twenty-four hours from influenza 
and complications resulting from that 
malady. 

The boai^ of health meeting will not 
be held till Saturday on account of the 
absence of Alderman Louden. 



If you want to make money quick 
call on Merritt & Leddell, room 4 
FargusBOD building. 



■ra-n 



OUR EUROPEAN SQUAORON 



PERSONAL. 



Evolutic ns of Our Fancy Squad- 

ron in Portuguese 

Waters. 



Not Well Received by Moors, 

Who Are Afraid of 

Its Grip. 



A Crisis Fast Approaches in 

the Affairs of the 

Pinto. 



London Jan. 13. — A correspondent 
with the I nited States squadron of evo- 
ution se ids the following from 
Tangiers: 

The United States squadron of evolu- 
tion, unde;' command of Admiral Walker, 
slipped its moorings in the Tagus the 
last day of the old year. The Atlanta 
and Boston took about 150 tons of coal 
apiece on l»oard at Lisbon. The Chicago 

will not coil until Gibraltar is reached, 
and even then there will be 200 tons of 
the coal put in her bunkers at Boston 
still untouched. Not a bad record, this. 
Ihe fleet got under way, the Chicago in 
the van, aiid following her in order were 
the Boston, Atlanta and Yorktown. 
These wen* followed at some distance by 
the Eoterjirise, which is on her way 
home. At the bar the Enterprise bade 
good-bye t} the squadron, shaping her 
course westward, the squadron heading 
southward at a speed of eight knots. 

The adu iral has decided to begin the 
year with a series of evolutions which 
will make the squadron as much admired 
for the facility with which it can be 
handled t a for its graceful appearance. 
When posf ible he intends to supplement 
these evolutions by land drills. 

The day following New Year's the 
squadron e teamed into Tangiers bay and 
caught Bigat of the quaint Moorish town 
and its w lite and windowless houses. 
The blood- red flag of Morocco was run 
up at the iiainmast and the necessary 
salute was fired. A few minutes later 
the quarantine flag was hoisted, for 
there were several cases of grip aboard. 

In the e'ening the Boston was treated 
to somethi ig of a surprise. A secret order 
had been g iven to the Atlanta and York- 
town to make a concerted attack on the 
Boston with boats. In the utmost si- 
lence the littacking force manned their 
boats, about forty men in each boat. 
The oars h ad been muffled. The boats 
of the Chiiiago crept away about a quar- 
ter of a mile astern of the flagship; those 
of the Atlanta were under the shadow 
of the si lore. The Yorktown's boats 
were to ao . ;; ; a reserve. Unfortunately 
the night Aat too bright. The search 
lights of all the ships were on duty. 
That of tt e Boston was sweeping the 
bay in a:l directions. The Chicago's 
boats advs need to the attack in a col- 
umn. Thisy were in the lead. No sooner 
had they c roflsed the bows of the Chi- 
cago, at Iheir best speed, than they 
were spotted from the Boston. While 
attention vas centered upon the Chi- 
cago's boa /S those of the Atlanta tried 
to steal a march on the Boston's watch- 
ful crew, t ut were at once unmasked. 
It looked (or a minute as if the York 
town's boi ts would get a bit nearer 
than the rBst, but when the situation 
looked most encouraging the Boston's 
search-light fell upon them and, meta- 
phorically, they went to the bottom of 
the bay, riddle<i by the quick firing guns 
of the Boston. The attack had b«en a 
failure. 'J 'he Boston had no reason to 
expect a s irprise, but had met it as eas- 
ily as if th e secret order had been sent 
to her too 

The moiTiing of Jan. 5, the squadron 
turned its back upon the Moors and in 
cruising crder steamed for Gibraltar. 
Gibraltar was reached, the Chicago 
anchoring in sixteen fathoms. Admiral 
Baird of the British Mediterranean 
squadron it once sent aboard to know if 
he could i i any way be of assistance. 
As the squadron entered the roadstead 
the English flagship dipped her colors. 



Mr. W. W. Griffin, a young but well 
known Detroit citizen, is visiting in the 
city. 

Mr. James Seville of the board of 
health left for Milwaukee today on a 
business trip. 

Mr. W. H. Cremer went down to St. 
Paul today, called there by the serious 
illness of bis mother. 

Mr. F. H. Feetham preached a sermon 
at the First Methodist church, in ab- 
sence of the pastor. There were no ser- 
vices in the church in the evening. 

Miss A. Mayer, Miss Emma Vachon 
and Mr. John Mayer, of Wisconsin, who 
have been making a short visit with the 
Misses l\eady, returned home today. 

A note to the editor from Mr. S. L. 
Merchant states that he will return to 
the "new New York" in a day or two 
from his home in the old New York, 
where he has been several months. 

On account of sickness Miss Myrta 
French, soprano of the First Presby- 
terian Church, was unable to be at her 
post yesterday. For the same reason 
musical services at the Congregational 
curtailed, Mrs. Nichols being a victim of 
the grip. 

Wednesday of this week Mr. Horace V. 
Winchellof Minneapolis, very well known 
in Duluth from his connection with the 
state geological survey, is to be married 
in Ann Arbor to his cousin, a daughter 
of Professor A. Winchell of the university 
of Michigan. 

Mr. Jay W. Anderson, general man- 
ager of the Clyde iron works, returned 
Saturday nighl from Cleveland and the 
East. He brought back with him a 
mechanical engineer, Mr. Webster, who 
haa been in a responsible position in 
Eastern engine and shipbuilding estab- 
ishmenta for many years. 



Register Resume. 

.\t the Spalding: A. Beauregard, 
Charles Ox, A. S. Guiterman, George A. 
More. John Rubenstein, H. G. Savage, 
Chic;igo; T. Kimball, C. Max Mays, W. 
E. Street, F. D. Street, New York; 
Charles Harlone, C. E. Baker, Boston; 
A. L. Gilbert, East Saginaw; Thomas 
Hodsen, Buffalo; J. E. McWilliams, J. 
E. Markham, C. R. Smead, St. Paul; W. 
E. Wolley, George E. Davis, E. B. Pat- 
ten, Minneapolis; George L. Roberts, 
Detroit; George E. Putney, Royalson; 
J. T. Garry, Stillwater; T. C. Dymond, 
St. Louis. 

At the St. Louis: Dr. E. C. Estes, 
Lake City; H. B. Johnson, R. J. White, 
G. R. Burns, Chicago; E. L. Gibson, 
Nicholas Lahr, Elias Arnold, St. Paul; 
S. A. Mayo, Minneapolis; O. R. Kelly, 
Augusta; T. B. Jennings, Mankato. 

.\t the Merchants: E. N. Herald, N. 
A. Wheeler, N. L. Davidson,J. A. Sumer, 
St. Paul;W. E. Forward, D. Gleason, 
(ieorge A. Patrick, Fred Dowse, Mar- 
quette. 

CITY BRIEFS. 



>/IVA PORTUGAL. 



The Crisis 

Lisbon, 
signed. !; 
vative leai 
at the me< 
do;!iands < 
The minoi 
the shire < 
mands m 
country s 
tration foi 
citement i 
the streeti 
pinto" "V 



8 Approaeliiug in Portugal Very 
Rapidly. 

Jan. 13, — The cabinet has re- 
enor Pimental, liberal conser- 
ler, voted with the minority 
>ting of the council when the 
if England were acceded to. 
ity was in favor of evacuating 
listrict, but opposed other de- 
ade by England, unless that 
ibmitted the dispute to arbi 
thwith. There is much ex- 
n the city. Crowds paraded 
t last evening, crying: "Viva 
va Portugal." 



'."he Prevailing Disease. 
Minneapolis, Jan. 13. — Edson H. 
Graves, si perintendent of the Hastings 
& Dakota division of the Milwaukee road 
died here today of the grip. 



Prepare for the grand skating carnival 
at the West End Parlor skating rink. 
Twenty -fi "st avenue west and Superior 
street, Fr day evening, Jan. 17. Three 
good prizes to be given away, one for the 
finest ladips suit, and one to the gentle- 
man with finest suit, also one to the per- 
son wearing the most comiciil suit. 
Come and have a good time. Walker's 
military Land will furnish music. 

r. M. Ekickson, Proprietor. 
Capt. S. (t. Johnson, Manager. 



There were seven Sunday drunks at 
the police office this morning. Disposed 
of in the usual manner. 

W. C. McCrimmon, who served on the 
late grand jury, received his second nat- 
uralization papers this morning. 

.John Reinke, aged 16, died yesterday, 
the cause of bis death being typhoid 
fever. He had lived with his parents at 
816 East Seventh street, and will be 
buried tomorrow afternoon. 

Sheriff Sharvy, on behalf of the pris- 
oners in the county bastile desires to 
thank Rev. C. C. Salter for large weekly 
donations of reading matter which are 
obtained at the Bethel every Monday 
morning. 

Thomas Cullyford and Annie Gordon 
Lorence Noniack to Anna Ladzinska„ 
and Edward Ott to Martilde Nimke are 
the parties to a trio of marriage licenses 
which were lately issued by Clerk Press- 
nell. 

Capt. Antoine Paul will move into 
town with his family from the poor farm 
tomorrow. They will occupy Kreger's 
house, corner of Third avenue east and 
Fifth street. Commissioner Paul's suc- 
cessor as overseer of the poor farm will 
take his post tomorrow. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office. Hotel St. Louis: 12 m., 
17 above; .3 p. m., 16 above; 6 p.m., 14" 
above; 10 p. m., 10 above; 7 a. m.. 1' 
above; 9 a. m., 3' below; 12 m., zero. 
Maximum, 17 above. Minimum, 3 be- 
low. D;;ily range, 20 . 

The land contest between Moran and 
David Sang has been decided in favor of 
the latter. A similar case between L. 
W. Safford and Wilson has been decided 
in favor of the contestant, who is al- 
leged to be i>rofessionally engaged in 
contesting. This contest involved a 
large amount of mining property adjoin- 
ing the town of Ely. 

The Jean Du Lhut Land company 
held its annual meeting Saturday after- 
noon. Officers were elected as follows: 
D. G. Cash, Wm. Craig, W. W. Sanford, 
James B. Howard, Chas. P. Craig, direct- 
ors; D. G., Cash, president; Chas. P. 
Craig, vice-president; James B. Howard, 
secretary; F. W. Paine, treasurer. 

The Sanborn Insurance map company 
have had a man at work for the past 
week making changes, adding new 
buildings, etc., which have been erected 
during the year, on the fire maps. The 
last one was finished at the board of 
health office this morning. There are 
nineteen of these maps in use among 
the insurance men of the city. 

The county commissioners met this 
afternoon, pursuant to adjo irnment. 
They transacted the wind-up of the 
January meeting's business, principally 
relating to court house and jury matters 
and adjourned until the next regular 
meeting. 

In the total of 6561 miles railroad con- 
struction for 1889, 5:^) miles were built 
in the United States, and Minnesota 
stands fifteenth in the roll of the states 
and territories in the amount of new 
mileage constructed, namely I62I2 miles, 
and the Duluth & Winnipeg with its 
fifty miles of new rails is the twenty- 
seventh in a list of 469 railroads. 



REAL ESTATE 



Special Bargains I Snaps. 

3 Lots in Endion, $4500. 

2 Lots In Highland Park, $2500. 
20 Acres in I 0-50- 1 4 at a bargain. 
63 Lots adjoining London, cheap. 



A f(sw of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale on easy ternns. 

Twunty acres on the hill at a great bargain. 



J. M. ROOT & CO., 



iBilUCKV*! HWggffW «JJ1-l-LJ ^ 



Room 0, Metropolitan Block, 







*■ 



i 



.1 
J 

r 

! 



+ 



DULUTH liVENTN'G HERAXD: JAIOJARY 13, 1890. 



EVENlNi* IIEIIALD. 

ELIOT LORD. Publl«her. 

PRICE, THREE CENTS— Subscription Rates: 

Dally, by mall, per year 'I'SS 

Dally, by mall, per three months 2-00 

Dally, b> mall, per «>ne mouth 'o 

IN THE CITY. 

Dally, by carrier, per week '8 

Batered at the postoffice at Duluth, Minn., as 
seuoDd-claas mall matter. 

ei'~The Washlnirton otHce ot The Herald 1? 
M llit New Vork avenue, N. W. where the 
paper Is kept on tile and where The Herald 
oiirrespondeut will welcome visitors J^m the 
Northwest. 



TO GUIDE CONGRESS, 

The annual report of the interstate 
commerce commissioners to congress 
just sent in is of t-special interest to Du- 
luth and the Northwest. This is so, 
both because of its careful investigation 
of the matter of Canadian railway trans- 
portation and competition and because 
it will be taken as a basis for guiding 
legislation on the subject. The impor- 
tance of the main Canadian lines to the 
business of the North is fully and justly 
recognized. It is observed at the outset 
that Canadian competition is a factor of 
increasing force, not casual or temporary 
but permanent. To the development of 
this factor our own citizens have con- 
tributed materially by direct invest- 
ments in the construction of Canadian 
roads, and by building connections 
within our own territory with these 
roads and leasing or otherwise surrender- 
ing control of these connections to Cana- 
dian companies. 

The commission then presents in de- 
tail the extent and business of the Cana- 
dian Pacitic and Grand Trunk systems. 
The diversion of business to these sys- 
tems is simply explained on the ground 
of low rates charged on through trafBc. 
The differentials allowed by the traffic 
agreements between the different com- 
panies are quoted and the reasons dis- 
cussed why the Canadian roads can 
afford to carry freight at rates so much 
lower than those of the American lines. 
It is observed that in the tirst place the 
Canadian roads must in general carry at 
lower rates in order to participate in 
American traffic. The American roads 
are many in number, under different and 
sometimes hostile managements, and 
hence divide the business, require larger 
ex peases for management, and are 
keenly competing among themselves. 
The exceptionally heavy grades of the 
transcontinental lines to overcome 
mountain summits, large expense for 
fuel, for maintenance of snow 
sheds and snow service, and 
other incidental matters add greatly to 
the cost of operation. On the other 
hand, very different conditions exist 
with respect to Canadian carriers. On 
the Canadian Pacitic, the only through 
transcontinental line, the grades are 
much easier, and, it is claimed, less in- 
terruptions occur from snow blockades 
and similar causes. There are practi- 
cally only two great systems in Canada, 
the Grand Trunk system and the Cana- 
dian Pacific. There is, therefore, unity 
of control and management, and no oc- 
casion for auxiliary associations or for 
division of earnings, except w^ith ad- 
juncts in the United States. 

That there is substantial force in 
these argumeots cannot be denied, and 
no valid reason appears why the trans 
coalinental commerce of the Northern 
Uuited States should be de- 
barred from the advantage of 
the more economical freight carriage 
afforded by the superiority of location, 
shortening of distance and efficiency of 
conduct. It is, however, noted by the 
CJinmission that an extra advantage 
may be obtained because of the freedom 
from restriction of the Canadian roads 
in respect to short and long haul traffic. 
The Canadian roads have the liberty 
under the Dominion statutes, as the 
commission interprets them, to charge 
high rates on local business to IndemDify 
for losses on through business, and 
while the managers deny that their local 
traffic is subjected to higher rates, the 
commissioners think that the provisions 
of the statutes are such as to tempt to 
such discriminations, though they make 
no positive charge of the existence of the 
practice. 

In view of the fact that the subject is 
under investigation by the senate com- 
mittee on commerce, Xhe commission re- 
frains from any recommendations, but it 
very fitly calls attention to the reciprocal 
privileges enjoyed by us in carrying 
goods through Canada and through the 
canals, and points out other facts 
that should be weighed in the 
balance in considering the pres- 
ent competition. It concludes with 
force and truth: 

"There is no doubt that considerable 
portions of our country are benefited by 
the transportation over Canada lines, by 
reason of the cheaper service, especially 
Northern and Central New England and 
large portions of the Northwest, as far 
south as Chicago and including Michi- 
gan, and, in fact, generally along the 
whole border, and even beyond it. 
Many of our citizens feel a deep interest 
in the subject, and would consider them- 
selves aggrieved by any measures result 
log in an advance of rates over these 
roads." That is so, and congress should 
be made to realize it fully. 



ing this evening. The city demands 
prompt and effective action upon it. If 
it is judged impracticable for the city 
to undertake the clearing of all its side- 
walks by city employes at the expense 
of all the taxpayers, an ordinance should 
be passed enjoining resident property 
owners to clear the snow from the side- 
walks bordering their property imme- 
diately after a snowfall, and providing 
for the removal of snow by city em- 
ployes from sidewalks adjoining lots be- 
longing to non-residents at the expense 
of such property owners. The council 
should wake up to the fact that Duluth 
is not a snow-bound village and should 
not be left in the condition of such a 
village. 

SEEN AN3 HcARO. 



It win be of not a little Interest to Duluthlans 
to know that as loufr a^ as 1856 there was an 
iron fteatner built In Eufirland on about the 
fame lines as the now famous whiilebaeks of 
(Japt. McDougnll's invention. It was the Cur- 
lK)n and was built for the coal-oarryiii»r tni le, 
and even now, thlrty-flve years aflei her 
lauucblDK'. Is in successful commission l)e- 
t ween Newcastle and London. This will Illus- 
trate the life of this class of vessels. It Is a 
little curious, too, that two of the especial com- 
mendatory featui-es of the McDouifall whale- 
backs, of which their inventor has always felt 
sure and in which he has already been proved 
correct, were also In the Ixmt of the earlier 
builder, who claimed espe<'ial seaworthyness 
and a freedom from the necessity of trlmmins 
cargoes. 

% if * 

I was talkinK with a gentleman last nigrht 
whose knowledge of things theatrical was 
both deep and profound. He was Indulging In 
many anathemas over the Inferior theatricitl 
companies which are so numerous esiHJcially 
in the Northwest. Said he; "There are very 
few companies on the road w^orthy the namer 
It seems to me," said he, in a burst of wrath, 
••the more the theater-goers are impoeert on 
the belter they like it. Nine times out of ten 
those cotnpanies which make the most spread 
are barn-stormers of the vilest description. 1 
am glad to see The Herald does not encourage 
this class If other newspapers would do 
their duty and every time these second-rate 
companies inflict themselves on the commu- 
nity, roast them as they deserve, there would 
be fewer snide csncerns in the profession. But 
generally In the small towns they get the edi- 
tors to put in some bogus clippings tor whU-b 
they reward him with a lewcomps. The people 
are fooled by the fraudulent representations 
contained in the newspaper which professes to 
stand between them and fraud, and of course 
once they have paid their money there is no 
remedy. Boast the dod-gasted barnstormers 
and a long-su tiering public will rise and call 
you blessed." 

* * « 

"Sh, my dear," said a matronly lady who is 
a strong exponent of the glories and accom- 
plishments of the doctrine of Christian science, 
"you forget that I am a Christian scientist, 
and of course 1 don't have corns: Don't you 
know that we don't have any of the ailments 
that mortals outside our belief have? No one 
need suffer from any aches or pains If they 
will embrace our belief." 



LITTLE (.HUNKS OF NEWS. 

A fireman: Chief Hafey's idea of 
changing to keyless fire alarm boxes is a 
good one. I remember last summer we 
went to a box and, wanting an extra key, 
I went to the house where it should be. 
It should have been hanging in the ves- 
tibule but was not there. The lady of 
the house was summoned, a request 
made, and instead of getting it at once 
she had to know what it was wanted 
for. It was not until after lots of talk 
that she consented to get it. In a pan- 
try and in a glass preserve jar, with the 
cover screwed down, it was found, and it 
was at least twenty minutes from the 
time I asked for it uutil I got it. Imag- 
ine a fire then, a bouse would have 
burned down while I waited. 

Edward W. Wnite, secretary of board 
ol education, St. Paul: I am enthusias- 
tic in praise of the reception tendered 
by the Duluth people to Bishop McGol- 
rick last Thursday. It was beautiful in 
its completeness and admirable in ap- 
pointments and details. 

Erickson A; Strom: The realty market 
is livening up a good deal. 

Wieland Bros.: We find more demand 
for acreage than for city property. High 
pr.ced lota are not moving so fast. 

Gridley & Mishler: There's plenty of 
"big deals" on hand, and enough if 
known to cause considerable sensation. 
There's going to be great activity in the 
vicinity of West Duluth, and very soon. 

George Liong: Yes, I think I shall 
make my home in Duluth. Have lived 
in Mankato, but find Duluth to be the 
beet business point in the West in which 
to invest money. This city has a great 
future. It will be the future commercial 
melrojKjlis^f the West. 

MOULDERS OF THOUGHT. 



WANT AN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Roger S. Powell: Ves, I read that 
suggestion of Judge Ensign's about an 
historical society, and I think it a good 
one. The Old Settlers association is all 
rittht, but it is too exclusive and doesn't 
admit of as large a membership as an 
Historical society. There are lots of 
people wiio would gladly aid the forma- 
tion of the latter who cannot possibly 
belong to the former, and who possess a 
vast amount of information concerning 
the early history of this section. 

T. H. Pressnell: I iielieve an histor- 
ical society would not only be popular 
but would also 



St. Cloud Journal Press: Dr. J. F. 
I'"'ulton of the faculty of the university 
medical department, was yesterday ap- 
pointed by Governor Merriatn to the 
board of trustees of the hospital of the 
insane. This appointment is highly 
commendable and is in the direction of 
healthful revision of the board. 

Fergus Falls Journal: The Scheffer 
anti-drunk law is evidently a great suc- 
cess. The county attorney's report 
shows that thirty-four persons were con- 
victed in this county last year on first 
offenses under the law, while i here have 
been only two cases of second offense. 

Grand Forks Herald: The bill of 
Senator C. K. Davis for the improve- 
ment of the Sault Ste. outlet interests 
the entire Northwest. 

Sauk Rapids Free Press: All this 
bosh about C. B. Buckman having sold 
out his friend Sabin, will have no effect 
upon the ties which bind Davis, Sabin 
and Bin'kham. It can lae put down that 
Buckman will be aj pointed surveyor gen- 
eral in uae time. 

Is This Wiseousia Jealousy ? 

Ashland Press: Following in the 
steps of Ashland's common council 
Superior has refused to license a " vari- 
ety" show, with beer and other attach- 
ments. Duluth's council has not yet 
acquired sand sufficient to take the bold 
and onward move. 

The Independent West. 

Sioux Falls Press: Money has been 
ve-y stringent in Njew York and other 
eastern cities. They have been sending 
it West for products, and for some reason 
or another a large portion has remained 
west, which indicates that this section 
is becoming year by year more nearly 
self sustaining, and has to buy less of 
the East, while the East has to buy more 
of us — thus causing a change in the bal- 
ance of trade. 



BITS OF STATE NEWS. 



Judge Crosby sentenced Mra Ellen 
Holmes of Hastings, found guilty of 
manslaughter in the second degree, to- 
day to one year in the state prison at hard 
labor. 

Professor H. A. Hazen, who is a 
nephew of the late chief of the signal 
service will arrive at St. Vincent the lat- 
ter part of this month, on an extended 
visit to make meteorological observa- 
tions. St. Vincent is one of the most 
important stations in the United States 

The presentation of the flag by the 
board of education to the high school at 
Owatonna was made the occasion of a 
very interesting program. Professor 
Kenaston made the presentation and 
Miss Ella Carter, in behalf of the school, 
received it. The program consisted of 
patriotic songs, recitations, etc. 

The St. Cloud Bridge company has 
opened bids for the new bridge a^-ross 
the Mississippi river. A large number 
were received from firms all over the 
country, but it is understood th^t the 
bid of Foley Bros, was the lowest, it 
being for ?51,000. The contract has not 
yet been awarded, but the Bridge com- 
pany have agreed to let the contract by 
Wednesday. 

W. W. Cargill has asked the city of 
La Crosse, Wis., to condemn for his use 
a strip of land 70x300 feet, on which he 
will within a year erect a mill at a cost 
of $o(UXX). Mr. Cargill's mills at Hpkah 
and Houston, Minn., have been much 
improved by the addition of machinery 
within the past month and their capa- 
city increased — the first from 250 to 350 
barrels and the second from 350 to 500 
barrels. 

Charles Beauman, a farmer residing 
south of Wjiseca, narrowly escaped be- 
ing killed by a vicious bull. He was 
leading the bull along when the animal 
suddenly made a dive for him, striking 
him with his horns. Beauman dodged 
among the trees pursued by the vicious 
brute. The bull finally caught Beau- 
man, and broke one of his ribs on the 
left side near the heart, and struck him 
several times in the abdomen, causing a 
rupture, although the horns did not pen- 
etrate the body. 



The Weather Balletln 




Meteorological report received at Duluth 


Minn., 8 a. m. Jan 13, \mi. 


PUACKB. 


Bar 

30.06 


Ther. 


Wind 


Kain. 


Weather 


Duluth 


-2 


8W 


.08 


Cloudless 


Pt. .\rthur.. 


29 H2| — t 


NW 


.08 


Cloudless 


Winnipeg .. 


3l).24'-22 


8W 




P't Cloudy 


St. Viui«nt 


ao.Wi -3» 


N 




Cloudless 


Q'Appelle . 
Assinlb'ne . 


30.3<il— 16 


Calm 




Cloudless 


1 .. 




T. 




Helena 


3ll.l0| 4 


8W 


T. 


P't cloudy 


Huron, Dak. 










St. Paul.... 


.w.u; 6 


NW 


.Itt 


Cloudless 


La Crosse. . . »» W( 8 


NW 


.44 


Cloudless 


Blsmarck...j.'iii 24— 18 


Calm 




Cloudy 
Cloudless 


Moorbead ..|30.3O;-30 


Calm 





T In rain eolunin Indicates trace One (1) 
inch of rain or melte<I snow equals ten (10) in- 
ches of snowfall. .Minus (—) in temfHjrature 
column indicates below zero. 

W. H. Fallon, 

Sergeant Signal Corps 

Washington, Jan. 13. — Forecast for 
twenty-four hours, ending 8 a. m. to- 
morrow: For Minnesota: Fair, south- 
westerly winds, warmer Tuesday. For 
Xorth and South Dakota: Fairjollowed 
by local snows, warmer Tuesday, vari- 
able winds. 



Fact. 

Oshkosh Northwestern: But the Mc- 

Ginty racket is absolutely the most 

foolish, hollow and silly tnat ever was 

inflicted on the country, and the time 

be of immense value, I must shortly come when the death pen- 



and now's the time to set about it before 
the old tuners begin to die off. There 
are lots of relics ot the early times which 
would 1>J donated to the rooms of such a 
society which would form the nucleus of 
a large collection; I've got some myself 
which I could contribute to the general 
fund. 

H. S. Mahon: That historical society 
idea of Judge Ensign's, as The Herald 
presented it Friday, is the correct thing 
and we have had several talks on the 
subjec";. Why, do you know, citizens of 
Duluth and vicinity are every year cot: J 
tnbuting valuable articles to the State 
Historical society, which are almost lost 
sight if iu the state collection, but which 
are very valuable and would soon forma 
fine museum here, where the articles 
rightfully belong and where they would 
be fully appreciated by the very people 
who made their surroundings interest- 
ing and prominent. 

W. S. Woodbridge: I'm not exactly 
an old settler, for I came here in 18(jy, 
and you want to hear from the old fish- 
eaters of the 50's and (JO's about this 
matter. Still it seems to me that all of 
us, who have cast our lot in Duluth, 
even those who have just come, are in- 
terested in this proposed association and 
want to see It formed. There is a great 
deal of intense interest in the early life 
of the head of the lake that'll never be 
known but by such an association. 

WISHES. 



alty is the only punishment that can tit 
the crime. 

Don't Pay L'p. 

Ashland Press: It is stated that only 
about 816.(X)0 out of the total 898,000 has 
been paid in the present time. .Ashland 
citizens are hustling in every quarter to 
gather in the shekels to pay the taxes. 
There is a good demand for country and 
city orders, although a discount is made. 
"We've got to do something," said the 
mayor, "And I don't see but what this 
will be all right until the council meets." 



lattice at 



The declared inability of the president 
of the Silver Creek and Morris Coal 
Company of Chicago to secure a pre- 
ferred location here for the business of 
the company and an extensive manufac- 
turing adjunct because of the prohibi- 
tive pritje fixed on the property is a bit- 
ter bit of information which property 
owners here should very seriously con- 
sider. Every reasonable inducement 
should be offered to substantial enter- 
prises of this kind to locate here, and in 
face of the extraordinary solicitations 
made on the other side of the bay, water 
front property owners here may expect 
to see property on that side taken and 
their property left on their hands if they 
are not willing to listen to reason and 
see the plain condition of things before 
their eyes. 



lOnce a Week.l 
If I were only a ray of the sun. 
How 1 would steal through your 
dawn: 
Touch all the things you had touched, one by 
one. 
Border with gold all the clothes you had 
w rn. 
Trembling and hoping to see in the glass 
Trace of my light in your face as you pass! 

If I were only a breeze of the night. 

How I would sigh of my love, and despair! 
Kiss your soft cheek and your lips— if I 
might- 
Chase tlie white moonbeams that lay in your 
hair. 
Hushing the nightingala, iest while he »\og% 
You should l»e deaf to my whispering wings. 

If I were only a wave of the sea. 
Born like a sigh from the breast of the 
deep — 
Knowing the end of my Journey to be 
Death— when life's gifts were most worthy 
to keep. 
Yet would I laugh while my broken heart 

beat. 
Death were life's crown— If I died at your feet. 

Financial Ability. 

Lawyer — Your uncle makes you his 
sole heir; but the will stipulates that the 
sum of one thousand dollars must be 
buried with him. 

Heir, (feelingly)— The old man was 
eccentric; but his wishes must be re- 
spected, of course. I'll write a check for 
that amount. 



NOTED PEOPLE. 



at 



That unsettled snow clearing question 

will come before the council at its meet- 1 its great curative value, 



Does Kxperience Count? 

It does, in every line of business, and 
esi)ecially in compounding and preparing 
medicines. This is illustrated in the 
great superiority of Hood's Sarsaparilla 
over other preparations, as shown ijy the 
remarkable cures it has accomplished. 

The head of the firm of C. I. Hood & 
Co. IS a thoroughly competent and ex- 
perienced pharmacist, having devoted 
his whole life to the study and actual 
preparation of medicinea He is also a 
member of the Massachusetts and Am 
erican Pharmaceutical associations, and 
continues actively devoted to supervis- 
ing the preparation of and managing 
the business connected with Hood's 
Sarsaparilla. 

Hence the superiority and peculiar 
merit of Hood's Sarsaparilla is built 
upon the most substantial foundation. 
In its preparation there is represented 
all the knowledge which modern research 
in medical science has developed, com- 
bined with long experience, brain-work 
and experiment. It is only necessary to 
give this medicine a fair trial to realize 



Wilkie Collin's library will be sold 
auction in London Jan. 17. 

A New York manager has offered 
Henry M. Stanley 8100U a lecture for 
fifty lectures, to be given in this country 
next winter. Mr. Stanley has not as yet 
replied to the offer. 

Mr. Edward .\tkinBon gave a very in- 
teresting talk last evening, oa "English 
Worthies," before the Tuesday club of 
Brookline, at the residence of the presi- 
dent, Mrs. L. Shannon Davis. A recep- 
tion followed. 

It is reported that the Hon. Thomas 
Palmer, United States minister to Spain, 
will resign his mission next spring and 
return to his home in Michigan for the 
purpose of running for the governorship 
of his state. 

Prince George, the second son, and 
Princess Victoria, the second daughter 
of the Prince and Princess of Wales, 
have been attacked with influenza. 

Col. W. A. Bancroft has formed a law 
partnership with Mr. W. K. Blodgett, 
Jr., formerly assistant United States 
district attorney. 

It is said that the French government 
has been much offended by the action of 
the Czar in granting a commission to 
Prince Louis Napoleon. 



Same F^verywhere. 

Minneapolis Journal: Managing Edi- 
tor of Morning Paper— Kid, take all the 
office shears down and get them sharp- 
ened. We've got to get out a paper 
tomorrow. 

Of Course, 

Puck: Biggs— that was a curious 
race — those two fellows starting off to 
see which could get around the world 
first, neither paying out a cent for travel- 
ing expenses. 

Boggs — Which beat? 

Biggs— Why both of them did. 



Sure. 



There is one thing which every 
must have and that's a blow out. 



'bud" 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

$583.33 

Will handle- one of Thomas »fc Hendrick's 
5 acre lots on the hill. A rare bargain. 
L. J. Taussig, 

Phrenix block. 



In order to give everybody a chance 
to participate in the benefits of our great 
holiday reduction sale, I have decided 
to continue it for the balance of this 
month. Don't miss the opportunity to 
get reliable goods at aAay-down prices. 
Sale closes fjositively Friday, Jan. 31. 
Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 

A house of ten rooms, good cistern, 
lot 50x150 at a great bargain, only $3(J00. 
Must be sold this week. 

D. H. Stevenson &, Co., 
• 43 Exchange building. 

Oneotu. 

We have a large and choice list of 
Oneota property which is a bargain if 
taken at once. 

Mendenhall. Sc Hoopes. 



To Lecture on Temperance. 

The following ie a clipping from a 
New York paper with regard to P. A. 
Burdick, who is expected to commence a 
series of temperance meetings in Duluth 
on Jan. 19. "Mr. Burdick combines in 
himself a number of rare elements. By 
nature and by grace he is splendidly 
equipped for his work. He at once en- 
lists and holds to the end the attention 
of his audience. He impresses you with 
a deep conviction of his downright 
honesty. He is tenderly sympathetic 
with all who have fallen victims to this 
sin. His appeals are saturated with his 
personal faith in the power of Christ to 
save the lowest. He has an inexhaust- 
ible fund of anewlote and wit and sar- 
casm and logic wherewith to send the 
truth home to the conscience. He is ab- 
solutely fearless. These, reinforced by 
a magnetism hard to be resisted, serve 
to make him a grand champion of a 
cause which today % challenging the 
best thought of this nation. ' 



Poor Muiiianity!, 

The common lot is one of sorrow say 
—at least — the pessimists, they who 
look al the worst side. Certainly what 
would otherwise be a Ijriglit existence, 
is often overslwidowed by some ailment 
that hangs it like a pall, obscuring 
perpetually the radiance that else would 
light the path. Such an ailment, and a 
very common one, is nervousness, or in 
other words, weakness of the nervous 
system, a condition only irremediable 
where inefficient or improper means are 
taken to relieve it. The concurrent ex- 
perience of nervous people who have 
I>er8i8tently used Hostetters Stomach 
Bitters is, that it conquers entirely su- 
persensitiveness of the nerves, as well as 
diseases— so called — which are invited 
and sustained by their chronic weak 
nees. As the nerves gain stamina from 
the great tonic the trouble disappears 
Uae the bitters for malaria, rheumatism, 
billiousness and kidney troubles. 

If you want your property sold quick 
list it with 

D. H. Stevenson &, Co.. 

43 Exchange building. 

"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Room D, Hunter 
block. 



Any kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms. 



6 PER CENT! 



Monev to Loan. 

Mendenhall A Hfxjpes have money to 
loan in amounts to suit the borrower, at 
the lowest rate of interest. 



We have at command unlimited 
amountsof money to lend promptly 
at 6 percent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



Loans Made on Unimproiieii Property, 



Be Sure 

If you have in.ido up your mi 1 to buy 
Hood's Sarsaparilla n ♦ j .iducedtotake 
any other. A Boston "adv. h- e..x'ii!j is 
worthy Imitation, tells jVu • p i_..t. tM-.ow! 

** In one store wlicro I wcni ■• ■> '^tiy Hood's 
Sarsaparilla the clerk ..rled to i :ui.*e nie buy 
their own instead of Hood's; hi- . i me their'-, 
vonld last longer; that j. nugL!, Uike it on ten 

To Get 

days' trial; that if I did not like It I need not 
pay anything, etc But he could aot prevail 
CO me to change. I told him I bad taken 
Hood's Sarsaparilla, knew what it was, was 
satisfied with It, and did not want any other. 
\nien I began tJiklng Hood's Sarsaparilla 
I was feeling real miserable with dyspepsia, 
and so weak that at times I could hardly 

Hood's 

■tand. I looked like a person la oonsmnp* 
tloiu Hood's Sarsaparilla did me so mucb 
good that I wonder at mystU sometimes, 
and my friends frequently speak of it." Mbs. 
Ella. A. Goff, 61 Terrace Street, Boston. 

Sarsaparilla 

Bold by an druggists. $1; sli forfS. rroparpd.^Ti!-/ 
fey a L HOOD & CO., Apolhecarls:. I,-^*,.;], r ; 

lOO Doses On-^ ~ ' 



REA L ESTATE. 
SPECIAL LIST 

BA RUINS 

OFFKREO BY 

C. E. RICHARDSON. 



Acreage on the hill, just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half Interest in this forty 
acres can be had tor $52,000 

80 Acres at West End, near Brook- 
dale Division 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior 150 

I Acres In the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 

The best bargain offered now Is stock in the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate ot profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Dul.ith 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 

C. E. RICHARDSON, 

326 West Superior Street. 
WEST DULUTHl 

& AUSTIN'S 

SPECIAL LIST. 

Good pair on Fourth avenue, $ 1 400, 
if taken soon. 

Dwellings near Car works and Iron 
Bay works for rent cheap. 

Good house and lot in Fifthdivision, 
$1200. 

Two lots on Grand (paved part), 
$4000. 

Good pair on Central (paved part), 
$5500. 

Best lots in Clinton and Car. ton 
Place, $300. 

A good lot in Hunters Grassy Point 
First division, $300. 

A triple corner on Main street and 
First avenue, $2400. 

If you will sell your property at a 
reasonable figure, pleas'- call, or write 
us about il immediately. 

Correspondence solicited, maps and 
any information cheerfully furnished. 
Loans and insurance carefully c.nd 
promptly attended to. 

MACFARLANE &. AUSTIN, 

West Duluth. 
30 FAROrSSON BL<XIK. 



80 Acres, section 9-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- I 5, 
80 Acres, section 33-49-15. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-50- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15. 

All below the market. 



COFFIN & WARNER. 



W. C. SHtfiWOOO & CO.. 

REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVE OENUiNE BAKOAIN8 IN 

LOT8 AND BLOCKS, 

In dint., parts ot the city and 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 

All we ask is for {.. rtles to examine our list and 

compare them «'ith ot.her prices before 

buying. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood &. Co., 



J. D. & R. C. RAY, 

REAL ESTATE. 

ROOM "B," - HUNTER BLOCK. 



E.C. GRIDLEY. J. C. MISHLRK 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 

Real Estate Brokers 

Room ae, Bzcbaiigv Uu'Idlntr. 
List your prouorty witt us at ^rhat Itls worth 
and we will sell it. We invite everybody to 
call !n and see us. and sttllcit C'jrrospondence 



lUIONEY TO LOAN IN ALL 
"'■ sums on Duluth Real 
Estate at 6 1-2, 7 and 8 per 
cent. No delay. 

JULIUS D. HOV'ARD, 
Room 3, - - Mil'er Block. 



BUILOINQ LOANS A 8PECIALTV. 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTQAQE8 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT. 



CLAiE & PRINDLE. 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 

Duluth National Bank Building. 




GREAT ENGLISH mmv. 

Murray's Specific. 

A ^uarantei cure for all ner 
vous disease such as Weak 
.Vtoraorv, I.(06S Brain Power, 

Hysteria, Headache, I'aiu In the 
liack. Nervous Prost ration, 
fieueorrhoBtt, liniversal I.assl- 
tude, Seminal Weakness, Impo- 
tcui-y and jreneral loss of powei 
of the Generative Organs;— In 

either sex, caused by ludlsore- 

BtlirtTtUlICi tii'n or over exertion, and whU^b 

uuauateiv lead to Premature TrmteKavkt 

Old Aire, insanity andionsum|)- 

tlon. ll.Ul) or a box or hix boxes 

for I6.U0. Sent by mail on re- 
ceipt of. price, l-'ull partloalars 

In pamphlet, sent free to every 

applicant. We Ga»raut*»> Six 

Bux«B to cure any case. For 

everj •o.W) order received, we 

send six boxes, with a written 

ffuaranteo to refund the iiJOuey|^».„^j|jj|g_ 

11 our Specific dof-s not effect a cure. Address 

Mil onmmunicatious tu the sole manufacturort 
THE MURliAY MEDIC INB CO. 

Kansas Citv, Ma 
Bold In Ualatfa by M»x Wtrth. 



Wm JEW M. 

The Season of Grand 
Resolves and Sol- 
emn Vows. 



All of Which is Well in Its 

Way, but Practice is 

the Thing. 



You Can All "Get There" if 

You Try, so You ha i 

Better Try 



THE NEW YEAR'S LEAF. 




IChicupo Herald. J 
Just now is llio time when the averajre man 
UeKln.s to prospeetively mentally plan. 
As the annual sweariiiK: otTseasoi. draws near, 
i »f the l<-af lie'll turn over the ttrist of the year. 
liverythiiiK that is wrong from his life he'll 

elfaec, 
And niiuffbt that's unjust in his thoughts have 

a place. 
He'c sure he has power all evil to shun 
When he says so and so then the business is 

done. 
But, in order to have his new plan brolten iu. 
He'd better not tarry a day to begin. 
And 'tis Ijest he should not use the leaves too 

fast. 
Why not employ this year the leaf turned for 

lasf/ 

Here we are thefirst of a new 
year as bright and happy as 
children with new toys- You 
have just closed up the record 
of the year 1889, and we sin- 
cerely hope the balance is in 
your favor--"by a large major- 
ity." If your expectations 
were not fully realized, we are 
very sorry indeed, and trust 
you will not think us too famil- 
iar if we commiserate with you. 
Well, never mind, don't feel 
badly because you failed to 
make the most of your oppor- 
tunities, for it can't be helped 
now. Recollect that there is 
no teacher in the world whose 
lessons are so impressive as 
Old Mother Experience. It is 
an easy thing to look back and 
see where you missed it, and 
then, too, in looking back at 
these bad breaks it seems so 
strange that you didn't know 
better. "Why," you say to 
yourself, "anyone who is half 
witted ought to have known 
better." That is true, but 
again we suggest that it does 
no good to harrow up your feel- 
ings in that way. The new 
year is spread out before you 
like a new blank book, all un- 
written. As the days go by 
the pages will be filled, one by 
one, and when the year is end- 
ed the volume will be closed 
and put away in your archives, 
and you will commence again. 
Since you commenced making 
up the book just closed, we put 
one of the finest pieces of 
suburban property on the mar- 
ket anywhere about Duluth; 
and simply because we offered 
lots at extremely low prices 
and on the people's easy pay- 
ment plan, a good many inno- 
cent and honest persons sup- 
posed that it was all a humbug 
and a cheat. We can't much 
blame them for jumping at the 
conclusion that it was outside 
farm land, instead of fine resi- 
dence property, because our 
prices were so low and our 
terms so favorable. But that 
is where many of you made a 
BAD mistake. Had you inves- 
tigated, you would have invest- 
ed, and so made money. But 
you can make amends for that 
this year. Now, in strict confi- 
dence (which we beg of you 
not to repeat), we will tell you 
something: Water works, sew- 
ers and electric lights will be 
put in at Lakeside, Lester Park 
and Crosley Park, a system of 
parks and boulevards laid out, 
hundreds of fine new houses 
and comfortable homes built, 
suburban train service greatly 
improved— although it is ex 
cellent now---and the whole 
face of affairs changed. Lots 
that now sell for $125 each 
will then bring $250; lots that 
now sell for $200 will readily 
sell at $400, and so on. It is 
hard to understand how people 
who feel assured that all this 
great growth is so near at hand 
should wait. The wayto make 
money is to get ahead of the 
crowd and buy before the ma- 
jority of people do, and before 
the developments occur. Now, 
if you want to start out the new 
year right and make a record 
with which you will be satis- 
fied, take our advice and buy 
lots in Crosley Park, and buy 
NOW. If you wan't to make 
your money go as far as possi- 
ble, and thus make the utmost 
with it, buy what you can reach 
on the easy payment plan and 
keep up your weekly instal- 
ments, and you will be c'elight- 
ed with the results. Remem- 
ber, you will have no interest 
to pay, and that makes quite 
a difference. 

Hoping that you will do your- 
self a kindness by following 
our advice, and wishing you all 
a most happy and prosperous 
new year— and many succeed- 
ing ones— we beg leave to sub- 
scribe ourselves 



Your real(ty) friends, 

c. L LoyEn & CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. 






TH|S LiTTUf BAMD oF.HOpE, CARRY SANTA CLAUS SOAP, 

A»lD1tou5E£ HOW VERY RapIdlY THEY'RE RiSiNS, 
Wk'ife EiIQa^ed them for a T« Me, 

AS THEY'RE SUITED F0RTH|S 'cLiMb', 
A"D ARE HApPY WHEf* EMPLOYED 
#.«^- »f* ADyErTjSjHq 





^6,on\,i, MKfAIRBANK&CQ^CHicAGO. { 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 



DR. GEO. B. HAYCOCK, 



Manager 



c» Performances Only 



—COMMENCING— 



MONDAY, JAN. 13 



THE GREAT 



LILLIW LEWIS 

In the following' repertoire: 

MoidayEv'g, - As in a Looking Glass. 
Tnesday EYening, - - L'Article 47. 
Wednesday Efening, - aew Magdalen. 



Sup )ort6d by W. A. WHITEOAR and her own 
company, with all the original scenery, show- 
ing the famous Monte Carlo by moonlight. 
New and gorgeous costumes. 



GFIAND SCENIC EFFECTS. 



PEOPLES THEATER. 

DULUTH, ■ JOHN 8. BARNES. Mgr. 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 15 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



N 



HOOM 10. 



F. HUGO &. CO., 

IiTSTrS,.A.2TCB. 

Metroikh.itan Block.I 
TELEPHONE 242. \ 



y 



QSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned, 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER, 106 Second St. East. 



WANTS, FOB SALE, ETC 



ONE CENT A aORD IN ADVANCE. 



•,\ 



AdvertisoraoHt* under this bead received at 
the lollowiuj? |iluee«, besides tlie business of- 
fice ol The Herald: 

Kndion I'liarinary. 137 Tenth avenue east. 
Koyce & Totinau, corner Fourth avenue 
and 8iiperior stix-cl west. 

J. W. NelHon, No. IWl. corner Eighteenth 
avenue west and Superior street. 

1). .luiinKoii, cliief clerli Phillips hotel. West 
Duluth. 




Uelp Wanted. 

WANTED— A cook for a small family. 
ijuire, ;£30 East sjccoiid street. 



In 



^^ 



rANTED^A flist-cla's German nnrse girl. 
' Address Uoom 2ilB. First National bank. 



w 



ANTED— Immedi.itely a girl for general 
liou.sework. Apply eio Steuson bloelL. 



I WISH to employ a lew ladles on salary to 
take charge of my business at their homes. 
Light, very lai^'inating and healtbtui Wages 
$M per weeK. Kelen-uce given. Good pay lor 
pari lime. Address with tiami), Mre. Marion 
Walker, Louisville, Ky. 



VV limily 
Ninth avenue 



This week, commdncing JAN. 1 3, 
Tlie Great Attraction, 

F'RISON LIFE 

—AND — 

The Best Karietj Show in the Sorthwest 

ADMISSION: 

TEN CENTS ! TEN CENTS ! 



THREE 



«CREAG[ 



Bargains 



-A girl lor genenil house work; 
of three. Call iu forenoon, 411 
avenue east. 

SALA RY, %M ex|>enses in advance. 
Kl}\J\J allowed each tiionth. Steady em- 
ploy mcut at home or traveling. No soliciting. 
Duties delivering and making collections. No 
IKisial cirds. Address with stamp, Uafer k. 
Co. Piqua. Ohio. 



/ 



W 



ANTED— Pastry cook, also other help. 
Inquire Phillips hotel. 



WANTED— Al the Womaus Employment 
Bureau, 211 t>uperior street east, two 
second girls and a dozen girls lor general 
house work. Employment obtained tree of 
cost. Mrs. A. D. Ayers. 



For Sale. 

TT^OR SALE— A heavy working team cheap 
Jj at A. W. liiler's 2ui Lake avenue south. 

II^OR SALE— My resideuc-e with 50 or 100 feet 
' at 315 East Mjcoud street. Terms to suit 
purchaser. K. A. Gilbert, tl Uuard of Trade. 




HEAVY HOK.SES tXHi SALE-lo head of 
heavy horscji, niiscd al Lake Parit, on 
lue Nortiiern PaciUc road, tor sale by C. W. 
Harvey. Can be seen al liowara barn, on the 
lake shore, Minnesota point. Uesideuce, SS 
West Fourth strt>el. 



Lost. 

LOST— Part of a goid-liuk cuff button In 
shape of three rings. Lost iu Superior 
or Duluth. Finder will receive reward by 
leaving llic same al my office, lioliori ti . Mc- 
Dowell. 'AT, West Sui»t.rior street. 




if taken at once. 



Land situated near 



Fur KeuU 



IT^OK RENT— Desirable 
J steam, etc.; nrivate family 
Herald olhce. 



room; bath. guA, 
Address S.. 



w 



ANTED— A furnished house for the win 
ter. L. J. Taussig, No. 9 Phoenix block 



Kluancial. 

DULUTH MORTGAGK LOAN COMPANY 
loans money iu any amount on f urni- 
lure, pianos, horses and wagons without re- 
moval troui owner's possession; alsu on ware- 
house leceipts, bank stocks, and any property 
ot value; notes discouulci; partial payments 
received and your own time granted tor pay- 
Z'eul; no delay: money on hand and furnished 
immediau-ly after security is approved. Wm. 
Horkau. .Manager, Kouin li, Fargusson block, 
Duluth, Minu. 

IF YOU WISH TO SELL OR BUY DULUTH 
or Superior bank sloi-k, cxirporatiou or in- 
vestment securities, call ou or address B. Mur- 
phiu, broker. U Banning block. Duluth, Minn. 




MISCELLANEOUS. 



NH. WILSON. ATTORNEY AND OOtTN- 
• sellor at Law. Will practice in State 
and united States Courts. All business given 
prompt attention, 44Fargus^m Block, Duluth. 
Minn. 




—THE— 



Greatest Snaps 



13LASTER1NG. 

H. T. DINHAM. 

All kinds of plastering done. Jobbing 
promptly attended to. Othoe. room D, Hun- 
ter block. 

"mrRS. J. S. DLNWOODIE. 

Teacher of Piano Forte. Voice and Si^bt Sink- 
ing. Chorus and Choir Conductor. 

Music rooms at J. J. Wigg^ins's, 16 East Su 
perior street, and at residence, 121 Tenth ave. B 



M 



B. H. PABKBK ROBINSON, 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION, 
8 MILES BLOCK. 



MCMILLEN & STEBBINS. ARCHITECTS 
and superintendents. Office, room No. 
— , Exchange building. 



I3AXMEH & HALL, ARCUITEOTS AJID 
Superintendi-nts.room V>, Exchange buUd- 
lUiT. Duluth. Miun. K. ■>. I'alraer. L. P. Hall. 



In the market. 



ADDRESS 



BOX A A. DULUTH. MINN. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. 



FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be tound a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table is supplied, and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



Grbat French remedy. Dr. LeDcc'8 i»bb- 
lODiOAL I'lLi.s, fp-.m Paris, Franee. act only on 
the generative organs in females and posi- 
tively cures suppression of menses (from what- 
ever cause i. and all perioti leal troubles pecu- 
liar to women. A safe, relialile remedy, war- 
ranted to excite menstruation or money re- 
funded. Should not be used during pregnancy. 
The large proportion of the ills to whicu ladies 
are subject is the direct result of a dBkirdered 
and irregular menstruation. Robt. Stevenson 
&Co., ''hlcago. III., H. Boswarth & Co.. Mil- 
waukee, Wholesale Aarts. The genuine only 
supplied by Rjyce & Tottnan, Sole Agt«., Du- 
luth. 



ajQ on Beet Set 
5DO.V-U "of Teeth. 

CULLUM, 

_ Painless Dentist. 

Koum l-T, 4Ue WeBt Superior Street. 
FuvuMon BloBk. Dulutk 





i:v. . .., =: 



■ 11 I MSH 




f 





DULUTH EVEKXNG HTCRAU) JANXTABY 13 1890. 



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The Condition of 
as Sized Up 
Heral i. 



Real Estate 
by The 



Speculative Business is Quiet 

Because of Tight 

Money. 



Transfers Light; Sonne Minor 



News 



of Realty 
terest. 



In- 



Real estate is quiet, there is no doubt 
of that. It is more quiet than was gen- 
erally expected by dealers and owners. 
Reasons for this are not, however, far to 
seek. There is a closeness of 
money in the Er-st, where 

all funds for speculative invest- 
ment are raised, and until this closeness 
is eased up somewhat there can hardly 
be any great amount of speculation any- 
where, though there is more here than 
in any other city of the West. Money 
is already showing slight sign of a bet- 
terment, though it can not be had on the 
best mortgages now within 1 or Ifg per 
cent of what it was offered two months 
ago. 

Most of the buying of today is for im- 
provement, though the syndicate deal 
for the purchase of between ^TOO.^KX) 
and iJI.OOO.IHjO worth of 
realty, on which tirst 
are to be made before the close of the 
week, is purely sjHjculative in character. 
The prospect for building in 1890 im- 
proves steadily and ihe outlook fully 
bears out and goes beyond any previous 
estimate made by The Herald. It is 
hard to single out any part of town; 
there will be tine business buildings, 
residences on the hill back of the center 
of town, great imprjvements at the 
West End, the same in the suburbs at 
the east, while all the land improvement 
companies will do a great amount of 
work. It is hardly expected that the 
municipal record for the year will equal 
that of either 1S88 or 188t), but this will 
give property owners a needed breath- 
ing spell. 

There has been but little buying dur- 
ing the past week,but a very considerable 
inquirj-, a good condition for the market, 
and one indicative of strength and hope. 
What few deals have been made have 
been at going prices, and there has been 
no attempt to cut. The transfers re 
warded during the week have been few 
and of small value, as follows: 

No, 

Tuesday 1 

We<iQe*ilay 7 

Thursday » 

Friday 7 

Saturday 13 

Monday 11 



Total 47 «5J,2i4 

There will probably be little new this 
week in the real estate line, and trans- 
fers will be light for some time to come. 
The principal reason for this light busi- 
ness is the fact that taxes are now due, 
and all deeds tiled must be accompanied 
by tax payments of 1889. For this 
reason tiling not required to be made 
will, as far as possible, be held back for 
several weeks or months. 

There is talk of several new factories 
and industries of various natures soon 
to be located on both aides the bay. 
These will undoubtedly stiffen up prices 
somewhat, though in some cases, especi- 
ally on the south side of the bay, prices 
are as high now as they ought to be 
after a dozen large factories are located. 



A Kubber Factory. 

Papers are signed and all preliminary 
negotiations carried out, so it is stated 
on authority, for the establishment at 
Superior of a rubber factory for the 
manufacture of all classes of rubber 
goods for the Northwest trade. There 
are already successful factories of this 
nature in Canton and other parts of 
Ohio. It is expected to ultimately em- 
ploy 50U mej in the factory, though only 
a comparatively small force will be 
worked until a trade is established. This 
will add not a little to the manufactur- 
ing importance of the head of the lake 
and will be West Superior's first manu- 
facturing enterprise of any large size. 

A I^urge Furchase. 

A syndicate represented by A. Har- 
rington of Minneapolis, has purchased 
Murray Jc Howe's addition to Duluth. 
The deed has not yet been placed on 
record, and the consideration is not 
known. This property consists of 
twenty acres and is worth about $35,000. 



THE ORE TRADE. 



Fonuice Interests .>oun Begins Aealn ; 
Good Prognostications for 1890. 

Iron Trade Review: Prognostications 
for 1390 being in order, it can be truly 
said that never before in its history has 
the iron trade entered a year with more 
encouraging omens. The business is on 
a sound basis; our markets are now in- 
dependent of foreign supplies, and 
prices, though stiff, have not gone above 
the boom mark. If no sharp advance 
Bui>ervenes during the first quarter of 
the year, nothing can hinder a year of 
the greatest prosperity. 

The situation in ore is still one of 
waiting and expectancy — the reaction 
following the enormously large sales in 
November and Decomber. Every day 
brings new evidence of the fact that the 
ore dealers have disposed of all the Bes- 
Bemer they dare sell at this time. This, 
however, does not preclude the possi- 
bility of a little more being offered to- 
wp.rd the close of the '90 shipments, after 
the present orders are filled. There 
have also been considerable sales of non- 
Bessemer ores. It is expected that the 
market will resume its activity within 
the present month, but meanwhile deal- 
ers are nol chasing each other in efforts 
to sell. The situation rather favors them, 
and it is a question of but a very short 
time until furnaces will be active buyers. 
The year will show an astounding in 
crease in the consumption by central 
furnaces, of lake ores, so that the in- 
creased amount of ore mined will be 
fully accounted for in a purely local 
way. 

Triumph fur Mule and Bob.Tall. 

The Street Railway company had a 
hard time keeping the track open yes- 
terday. The snow-plow was kept going 
pretty much all day, and a large force of 
shovelers was employed both Saturday 
and Sunday. The Car company takes 
much credit to itself in keeping their 
tracks open in the face of the heavy 
storm. The same storm blockaded the 
electric and motor lines in Omaha, so 
that traffic was entirely stopped for 
several hours. 



PROBLEM OF GO VERNMENT. 

Hon. Seth Low Coutinues His Discourse 

on the Sul^ect. 

[The Herald publi.-hes below a fifth 
installment of the address of Hon. Seth 
Low of Brooklyn, to the students of 
Johns Hopkins university. In view of 
the interest awakened in Duluth over 
municipal government and the future of 
this city, ihe matter will be of interest. 
It will be continued from day to day 
till completed.] 

It was contended by the commission 
appointed by Governor Tilden to report 
upon the government of cities, that 
there should reside, in the hands of the 
governor, for safety's sake, the power to 
remove a mayor, as that power already 
resides in the governor with reference to 
sheriffs and district attorneys. There 
can be no serious objection to this re- 
served power of removal if any com- 
munity desires it. Practically it would 
be resorted to very infrequently, if at 
all. But by all means let it exist, if it 
will satisfy cities to make a strong execu- 
tive. Until s«me such system is had of 
concentrating in the executive head of 
the city, power and responsibility equal 
to the demands of the situation, it is 
useless to expect in any city a truly 
efficient city government. For the 
general inefficiency of their citv govern- 
ments in the past, Americans need not 
blame universal suffrage, nor the other 
special conditions wnich affect t- .em. 
The fault has been organic in the struct- 
ure of the city government. 

The remedy must be sought in a 
change of that structure. Several of our 
largest cities already have moved in that 
direction. Most conspicuously. Brook 
lyn, Philadelphia and New York. New 
York has made the fatal mistake of giv- 
ing to the mayor power under conditions 
which do not involve responsibility. 
The present mayor of New York, for ex- 
ample, will appoint many commissioners 
whose term of office will outlast his own, 
and the term of one, if not two, of his 
Duluth I successors. Such officials, when they 
payments I are appointed, in effect are responsible 
to nobody. The mayor who appoints 
them cannot recall the appointment, 
and they have not even a responsibility 
by courtesy to the mayors who did not 
appoint them. To make the system safe 
responsibility must go with power — re- 
sponsibility w^hich is continuous and 
personal on the part of the appointee to 
the mayor, and on the part of the mayor 
to the people. 

The second condition of efficient ad- 
ministration is that executive work 
should be committed to one man. It 
seems strange that among so practical a 
people as ours it should be necessary to 
emphasize this plain truth. Yet there is 
scarcely an American city which does 
not violate in its city government, the 
dictates of this maxim, which sums up 
the whole testimony of human experi- 
ence. The old Romans, when they had 
live aqueducts, placed every one of 
them under the charge and sui>ervision 
of a single man. Our forefathers placed 
each of the executive departments of 
the general government in the care of a 
single officer. Who supposes, for a 
moment, that tke postoffice system of 
the country could have been developed 
to its present condition, except along the 
line of administration of executive work 
by single individuals? All the great in- 
terests affected by the Treasury Depart- 
ment are comoaitted without hesitation 
by our people to a single Secretary of 
the Treasury. Yet when it comes to the 
cities, and the small concerns, compara- 
tively, which are affected by them, our 
people appear to be afraid to lodge the 
administration of the department of city 
works, or the fire department, or the po- 
lice department in single heads. Scarce- 
ly a city can be found where, at some 
time or another in its experience, there 
have not been boards of three, or so- 
called non-partisan boards, for the con- 
duct of the most purely executive work 
which the city devolves upon^, any de- 
partment. 

If human experience teaches anything 
with greater emphasis than that execu- 
tive work to be well done should be com- 
mitted to one man, it teaches that the 
feeblest of all forms of administration is 
administration by committee. Yet, in 
many cltie^, the committees of the com- 
mon council are practically the execu- 
tive arm of the city government, the 
nominal executive having but little 
power apart from their direction and 
authority. American cities, therefore, 
must not expect to attain to a high de- 
gree of efficient administration until 
they commit to a single head each of the 
executive departments of the city. The 
principle of personal responsibility on 
the part of one man to his superior must 
permeate the deptartments from top to 
bottom before it becomes reasonable to 
expect any high standard of efficiency in 
city governments. There may, indeed, 
be a failure of executive work under 
these conditions if the head of the de- 
partment be, in fact, a poor executive, 
but the mayor ought to be given the 
right not only to appoint his heads of 
departments, but the right to remove 
them, so that when experience has dem- 
onstrated any apix)intment to have been 
a mistake, he can remedy it, and so prop- 
erly be held responsible at every moment 
for efficient administration in all parts of 
the city government, 

[To be oontiDued.l 



AT THE W[ST[eN SUBURB 



Prominent Man 
the Grip; Its 
at Shops 



Dies "from 
Affect 



SPORTINQ NOTES. 



Contracts for the 
Houses; News 
West End 



Dwelling 
at the 



Total. 

i i.tiOii 

6.»XI 

ii,7;n 

7.77« 
21.S71 

5.9y> 



W. Scott Yeager, of the real estate 
firm of Yeager Bros., died late yesterday 
evening. Mr. Yeager had been ailing for 
some days with some pulmonary trouble 

but up till Thursday did not apprehend 
anything serious. Till that time he at- 
tended to his business and was appar- 
ently in his usual health. Thursday 
afternoon he went home and became 
much worse, pneumonia supervening, 
from which cause he died Sunday even- 
ing. He was 32 years of age and unmar- 
ried. His body was taken to Lebanon, 
Ohio, this afternoon by his brother, 
George. H. C. Yeager, another brother, 
who has been ill for some time m St. 
Mary's hospital, is reported better today. 
Mr. Yeager's death htis created much 
surprise and great regret among his 
friends in the city, especially in real es- 
tate circles where he was a well known 
figure. His brother, H. C. Yeager, who 
has been ill at the hospital with the 
same disease, is better today. 

In another column appears the notice 
to contractors asking for bids on the 1.10 
dwellings to be built at West Duluth by 
the Car company. There isn't anything 
visionary in their houses, and July will 
see all of them built. The more the 
merrier, they are all needed. It would 
be a good scheme if the Iron Bay works 
would also build a lot of dwellings. 

A convenience is being added at the 
erecting shops in the shape of an over- 
head scaffold for the use of the car build- 
ers. This will allow a force to work on 
the upper part of the car and at the 
same time leave the aisles free so others 
can work on the lower part at the same 
time. 

This week both the bar and guide 
mills will be running daily and both the 
bar mill and the large hammers will be 
running at night also. The wheel 
foundry will be started again also. 

The Iron Bay {>eople are getting 
steadily down to business, and a large 
number of workmen are looking for 
homes for themselves and families, 
a week active work will nave begun. 
The various works are feeling the 
feet of the prevailing epidemic, 
number of men in different departments 
of all the shops being sick. 

Remember the lecture in the Congre- 
gational church this evening by the Rev. 
iVIr. Mitchell. Subject, "India, Her 
People and Religion." 

Mrs. J. P. Duff had the misfortune to 
lose her gold watch Friday evening. 
Anyone finding should return to owner 
who will give a reward. 

J. E. Morrison returned from a visit in 
the East Saturday. 

WEST END. 



The Leeds, Eng., Cricket and Foot- 
ball club is spending 820,000 on a new 
pavilion. 

Ed Holske and John Brewer have done 
nothing in Australia as yet. Holske has 
issued a challenge to Scott for a twenty- 
five mile walk. 

Advices from Melbourne state that 
James Stansbury will row William O'- 
Connor on neutral water for £500 a side 
and the championship of the world. 

Eugene Carter,the cushion-carom bill- 
iard expert, has established himself at 
the Grand cafe, Paris, and is doing so 
well that he thinks of remaining abroad 
until next spring. 

But three men, Clarkson, Ganzel and 
Tiernan, have broken their agreements 
with the Brotherhood, out of the first 
three clubs in the leiigue race, viz.: New 
York, Boston and Chicago. 

Charles E. Davies, Jackson's manager, 
has been notitieti by L. R. Fulda that 
Jackson must hold himself in readiness 
to meet John L. Sullivan at California 
Athletic club in May, for a purse of $10,- 
000. 

Efforts will be made to get O'Connor, 
Hanlon, Teemer, Gaudaur, Stansbury, 
Kemp, McLeane, Matterson, Peterson, 
Ten Eyck, Beach, Bubear and others to- 
gether in a grand regatta the coming 
season to settle the (juestion of rowing 
superiority, and a dispatch from San 
Francisco says that the citizens of that 
city will subscribe a purse of 82o,0(X) if 
the race is rowed on California waters. 

English sporting authorities are almost 
a unit in the expression that O'Connor 
is justly entitled to the scuUing cham- 
pionship. The Jjoudon Sportsman says: 
"From time immemorial, in the event of 
the title lapsing through death or re- 
tirement, it has always been considered 
that the last-defeated challenger has the 
prior right to claim, and therefore we 
hold that William O'Connor holds the 
key of the position at present, and no 
doubt the Canadian will be fully pre- 
pared to defend the coveted honor." 



NO ALUM — NO AMMONIA — NO LIME- 
NO PHOSPHATES, IN 

^CREAM 

Baking Powder 

MOST PERFECT MADE. 

Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for more than a quarter of a 
century. ^ It is used by the United States Government. Endorsed by the heads of the 
Great Universities as the Strongest, Purest and Most Healthful. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO. 

nnr YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. SAN FRANCISCO, 




WANTED ! 



Purchasers for 



Ttes Valuable and Nice-Lfing Lots 



Soii i tie 1 



In 

ef- 
A 



All the Kage. 
"Where you going, my pretty maid?" 
"I'm going to sneeze — achoo," she said. 



In order to give everybody a chance to 
participate in the benefits of our great 
holiday reduction sale, I have decided 
to continue it for the balance of this 
month. Don't miss the opportunity to 
get reliable goods at away-down prices. 
Sale closes positively Friday, Jan. 
31. Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 

For Sale. 
Forty acres at a bargain, six miles out. 
A big snap in this. Come and see about 
it at once. Erickson, Strom & Co., 
211 Pastoret-Stenson building. 



FOR SALE: 

SI-H-ln llcreap, - 
49-15-ln Jcteaie, 
Superioi Slteet 
Dock Pfoperty, - 



-12, 

1, 

- I, 



Lots for Sale as 
as $25 each. 



low 



B 



"If." 

Minneapolis Tribune Star: The 
report comes from a reliable 
source that the Washburn Cros- 
by company will not move to 
Duluth if the belt line around the mills 
is completed, but will build a large and 
complete mill at the falls. 



Two More Steel Ships. 

According to the Cleveland Plain- 
dealer the Chicago Shipbuilding com- 
pany recently organized for the purpose 
of building steel ships at Chicago, has 
closed a contract with the Minnesota 
Steamship company for two boats to 
cost al)out $210,000 each. The Minne- 
sota Steamship company is the Minne- 
sota Iron company of Duluth and with 
the close of this deal they will have six 
boats for the trade, four of them having 
been contracted for at Cleveland a few 
months ago. The Chicago company 
wdl begin work as soon as the new yards 
can be put in shape. All of the boats 
will be duplicates, 292 feet keel, 308 feet 
over all, 40 feet beam and 2-lJ^ feet hold. 

Doesn't Dlrtcriininate. 

The Manitoba, in its answer filed with 
the railroad commission, denies that it 
has discriminated in wheat shipments 
from Morris and Hancock to Minneapo 
lis and Duluth. 



A Couple of Itailway SiuaMhups; General 
News of the West End. 

There was a bad emashup in the 
Northern Pacific yards Saturday after- 
noon, caused by one of the switch engines 
jumping the track. The engine broke a 
hole into its boiler and a coach w^hich 
was being added to the Ashland train 
was thrown from its trucks and badly 
smashed. The fireman, Billy Mickle, 
jumped from the engine, but was more 
scared than hurt. "There was a small 
wreck on the Eastern trestle near the 
drawbridge yesterday. Trains had to 
run from West Superior over the St. 
Paul »fc Duluth bridge. 

The exhibition of fancy skating by 
Miss Mabel Davidson is to be given at 
the Parlor rink Tuesday night instead 
of Saturday, as was advertised. The 
ladies' fancy skating race at Twentieth 
avenue rink was postponed from Satur- 
day night until next Wednesday night. 

T. Nard has opened a confectionery 
store in the building formerly occupied 
by Chas. Summers. 

The chief of police Saturday night 
ordered all cigar and tobacco stores in 
the West End to allow no minors to play 
cards or shake dice for treats, etc. 

W. W. Griffin, son of one of Detroit's 
wealthiest citizens, and of the class of 
'89 of Ann Arbor, was a visitor with his 
old friend and classmate. Attorney Mc- 
Manus yesterday. Mr. Griffin is think- 
ing of locating here and if he should, he 
would be a desirable addition to Duluth. 

Geo. Meier of Marquette, was a visitor 
at the West End yesterday. 

Harry Hooper of Houghton, and Geo. 
A. Liberty of Marquette, were registered 
at the Clarendon. 

Thos. Craig and party have returned 
from a trip to a point north of Ely, where 
they think of locating claims. 



RO WN 



R 



O 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restaufants, 



—AND- 



T 



H 



FROM 
A cSoperior 



AT HOME. 



A big snap on Bench street. Lot on the 
upper side of Bench street. A beautiful 
site for a house, only ^1700. Easy terms. 
D. H. Stevenson A Co., 

43 Exchange building. 

To Landft of Suo. 

When old Boreas breathes on the 
lakes and rivers of the North, binding 
them in fetters of ice, there is a great 
deal of out door sport to be enjoyed by 
those who are endowed with rugged 
constitutions. But there are many who 
dread the approach of winter, and 
would migrate to "lands of sun" if they 
could be sure of a comfortable journey 
and knew where to go. . Among the 
lands that are sunny in winter are the 
Southern coast of the United States and 
California, the golden. There are 
numerous winter resorts in both sec 
tions, but for those who have time for a 
longer ride nothing can equal a trip to 
Old Mexico. There one is in a country 
where people, climate, customs and pro- 
ductions are all wondrously different 
from anything in Uncle Sam's domain. 
"The Burlington" has two lines of its 
own southward — to Chicago and to St. 
Louis. For full information as to rates 
and routes write to W. J. C. Kenyon, 
Gen. Pass. Agent, C, B. & N. R R., St. 
Paul, Minn. 



Paper Arraig^uit the Central 
Canal Scheme. 

Superior Times: For months past we 
have tried to impress upon our people 
that there was a determination on the 
part of the West End to cut a canal 
through Minnesota Point opposite the 
mouth of St. Louis river, and that the 
schome was being quietly worked wher- 
ever aa advocate could be found. The 
West End people have denied any seri- 
ous thought on the subject.^But snch 
was not the case. Our warnings were 
not heeded by our own friends, they pre- 
ferring to believe the falsehoods of their 
enemies to acknowledging their own 
danger, until two or three weeks ago 
when, finding that petitions had actually 
been sent to Washington, the chamber 
of commerce appointed a committee to 
enter a protest. The canal scheme, if 
carried out, means destruction to all 
that part of Superior bay lying east of 
Connors Point. 

We have the mask thrown entirely 
aside. Their line of battle has been 
formed; their generals are already 
mounted and ready. It has not trans- 
pired in any history of the past that 
either Senator Sawyer or Spooner are 
averse to such a scheme, and it is not 
certain these gentlemen will not favor 
the canal when the real tug of war 
comes. If our people care to preserve 
Superior bay and protect tneir harbor it 
is time they were taking active and 
energetic steps in that direction. If 
they think they can get along without 
it and do better by building up little 
pop gun additions out in the woods away 
from all civilization, all right, and we 
will have nothing further to say. 



E 



R 



S 



TAKE NOTICE I 

Wo arc agents for the celebrated 

Green Point China 



The Best In the World. 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



NEW HOTEL. 



-THE- 



FT 




Get our prices and you will be per- 
fectly satisfied. 



19 West Supetior Sket 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY, 

First class in everyway. 
Finest sample room 
eoiinectlon. WILI 



MINNESOTA. 



Newly refitted, 
n rown. Livery in 



AM GRANT, Prop. 

Open November I. 



Mortgages Negotiated. 



St. Paul, Minn., 

Cor. 4tli and WaHbinfrton St*. 

On Cable Oar Liuc. Rest Tabic in the Noitu 
west. Kateii 93.00 and Upwards. 

W . LL Bakkes. Manager. 



Certificate of AmendeiJ 



ARTICLES Of INCORPORATION 



OF LAKESIDE LAND COMPANY. 



6 AND 7 HER CENT. 



Danclni; and Deportment. 
Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No. 113 
West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents', 
Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 

The Herald bindery has the best 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



Smoke the Bndion cigar, the finest in 
the market. W. A. Footk k Co. 



The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptly. 



Lowest 
security, 
quire of 



rates for all sl/.os and grades pf 
Before borrowlnK elsewhere In- 



N. J. UPHAM, 

Under First Nat, Bank, 
NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, ( „ 
CouNTV or St. l,ouis, (**• 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, 
That we. Ozora P. Stearns, president, 
pud Wni. (.' Sargent, secretary, of Lakeside 
Laud company, a corporation organizeJ and 
doing l)U^iness under the laws of Minnesota, 
bcingdiily and severally sworn, do hereby cer- 
tify and depose that at a regular meeting of 
the shareholders of the said Lakeside Land 
company, duly called and held at the oiHces of 
said <'onipauy at Duluth, Minnesota, on the 
fourth day of January. 1IS90, at two o'clock in 
the afleriio<jn of said day, the articles of incor- 
(loratiuti ol said corporation were amended so 
a.s to increase the capital stock of said c-orpor- 
ation from one hundred and twenty-tlve thou- 
sand dollars, to tlve hundred thousand dol- 
lars and so as to increase the number 
of shares in the capital stock of said corpoi^ 
al ion from twelve hundred and fifty to five 
thoasand, by amending Article 'i of said 
original articles of Incorporation, which fixes 
the amount of the capital stock of said cor- 
poration at one hundred and twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars, bO as to read as follows, to-wit: 

AKTICLE 3. 

"The amount of the capital stock of the cor- 
poration shall t)e live hundred thousand dol- 
lars, (*.">ilil,UW.OUi ; to be paid in on cjill of the 
board of directors." 

And by amending Article 7 of said original 
articles of iucorporatiou, which fixes the num- 
ber of shares In the capital stock of said cor- 
porpation at twelve hundred and fifty, so as 
to read as follows, t.o-wit: 

AKTICLE 7. 

"The number of shares in the capital stock 
of the corporation shall befivelhou.saud (S.UUO;, 
each of the par value of one hundred dollars 
(♦lUO Oil), which shares when fully paid up 
shall be uon-assessable." 

That there were present at said meeting, 
who voted In favor of said amendments a 
majority in uuml)er of the shareliolders of 
said corponiliou, who held a majority in 
amount of the shares of stock of the same. 

OZOK.4. p. STE.^a.N.S, 

Wm. C. Sargent, President. 

Secretary. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



Mortgage Sale. 

DEFAULT HAVING BEEN MADE IN THE 
payment of the sum of three hundred 
fifteen 50-1(111 dollars (WIS 50i, principal and 
Interest, which is claimed to be due at the date 
of this notice upon a certain mortgage, duly 
executed and delivered by Francis X. Parent 
and Mary E. Parent, his vlfe. to Henry F. 
Davis, l)earlng date the seventh day of June, 

A. D. l^wit, and duly recorded in the olTice of 
the register of deeds in and tor the county of 
St. Louis, and state of Mipnesota, on the 
eighth day of Juno A. D. IISnT at 8 o'clock and 
10 minutes, A. M., In Book 41 of Mortgiges, on 
page ti7, and no action or pr»>ceeiiing af law 
or otherwise having been inslitute<i to recover 
the debt secured by said Mortgage, or any part 
thereof: 

Now therefore, notice Is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale contained in said 
mortgage, and pursuant to the statute in such 
case made and provided, the said Mortgage 
will lie forecloseil, and the premises described 
in and covered by said mortgage, viz: 

Lot* three tlOand four (4), of section eighteen 
(1«). and lot (3). of section nineteen (19), all 
In township sixty-three (tU), north of range 
twelve (lii, west of the 4th principal meridian 
In St. Louis county, and state of Minne- 
sota, with the hereditaments and appur- 
tenances, will be sold at public auction, 
to the highest bidder for cash, to pay said 
debt and inlcrest, and the taxes, if any, 
on sai<i premises, and twenty-five dollars 
attorney's fee, as stipulated In and by 
said mortgage in case of foreclosure, and the 
disbursements allowed by law; which sale will 
Ih? made bv the sheriif I'f said St. I>oul8 
county, al the front d<x)r of the Court House, 
In the city of Dulutb in said county and state, 
on the atth day of January. A. D. 1k»0, at 10 
o'clock a. m. of that day, subject to redemp- 
tion at any time within one year from the day 
of sale, as providtid by law. 

Dated December 13ih. A. D. 1889. 

Henky F. Davis, 

Mortgagee. 

B. N. Mahble, 

Attorney. 
Deo. 14-21-28. Jan. 4-1M8.25. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this *th 
day of January, 1890. W . E. Pbrky, 

Notary Public, 
St. Louis county, Minnesota. 
Notarial Seal, 
St. Louis Co., Minn. 



OFFICE OF REGLSTER OF DEEDS. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA. 
CoUNTv or St, Louis. 



[ss. 

I hereby certify that the within articles were 
flle<l in this office for record on the 8th day of 
January, A. 1). 181(0, at 3:10 o'clock p. m., and 
was duly recorded in Book G of Miscellaneous 
page ti. 

Amos Siiephard, 
Register of Deeds. 



I 



STATE OF MINNESOTA. 
Depautment of State, f 
I hereby certify that the within Instrument 
was filed lor record in tills office on the Uth 
dayof Januarv A. D. 1890, at 9 o'clock a. 
m., and was duly recorded lu book V of incor- 
porations on page i70. 

H. Mattson, 
Secretary of State. 

Jan. 13, 14. 16, 18, 17, 18, 30. 



Dr. EC. Wests 

HERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 



Spooinc for Hyrtoria, Dlziriness, Fltn, Ncnmlpia, Wakft 
lulne..s. Mental DrpicBston, Soflenliifr of tbi< llrain. re 
^ultlntf 111 In.-'anity nn*! leudintf to mlm^ry decAv ait<l 
fttMth. Prcmatiifo OKI Ago, IlaiTennca..*. I.08.s ol I'o'Aor 
iiieiihe."- sex. lnvoluiilary Loe^e-, iunl Sperinnlun lia>a 
■aii-HtHl t>v oYtT-eJceitlon of Ihe brain, »*etr-al!u>». oi- 
iiver-liiiiiil^iKV. Each liox contains one monlh's Irt-ai- 
nient. $1 a Imix. or six for $o, rent bv mail prrpaid. 
« ilh ertt'h orxler for t-ix box*'^, will ^en,^ pun-haser 
/'lamntre (o lurnnd monrv If the lriNiIm<'nt fails to 
^i*o. Uuarantovb is«uvd oiid 4;vnuiue »ol(l uiUy by 

Boyco i Totman, Phoenix Drug Store, and 
7 West Superior street, sole agents, Dulutb, 
Minn. 



fa r 



I. 

! 



!■«•*• 



\\ ' . '' *. >. ■■ ! ■ $ >t m 



( 
i 



NOTICE. 



Tlie regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of the First National Bank of Tower 
will be held at Its office In Tower, Minnesota, 
on Tuesday, January Uth, Is^OO, between the 
hours of 10 o'clock a. m. and 4 o'clock p. m., 
for the election of directors and for such other 
business as may come before the meeting. 
G. W. Hektges, 

Tower, Minn., Cashier. 

December 13th, 1889. 



HARWOOD'S 

Cit( Transportation Freight and Express, 

DRAYS. 



Office, 17 First Avenue Weet. 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



-:- WILL BE SOLO VEBY CHEAP -:- 



-ALSO- 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFiCE 

17 First Avenue West. 



FOR SALE 



Forty Acres 



Tliree Sood Building Lots on 




Near Third avenue east 



All these are well located and very accessible. 
Good schools and graded streets close by. 



ADJOINING 



[W LONDON 



Apply by letter or in person to 



"ED," 



O-i^iSE :E3::B:E..f^nL.iD. 



-AT A- 



Bargain 




R. KROJANKER, 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 



Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
4 kinds of furs a specialty. «®"Good workmii- 
%A ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 
209 East Superior Street. - . Duluth, Minn. 



Inquire of 



L. w., 



Postoffice Box A A. 



IHE BOLTOI HOT W M HESIER 



Has the best record for the longest time 
in the coldest climate. See one set up 
in our store. 

P. V. DWYER & BROS., 



Tjlephone 179. 



207 W. SUPERIOR STREET. 





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O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

AF?CHITECT, 



Rooms 510, S1I and 51?. Duluth Union National Bank Building. 



MEMBERS OF THE 



DULUTH CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION. 



^ 



American lExchange Bank 
Bell & Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Security Bmk of Duluth 
State Bank of Duluth 
National Bank of ComnnSrce 
Marine Bank 



CAPITAL. SURPLUS 

$300,000 $200,000 
100,000 10,000 



1,000,000 
I 00,000 
100.000 
100,000 
260,000 



1 00,000 
26,000 



I 



■! Na 



■ ■^ 9 * m ' W "^ 



: ^ ' jg *■ ■ ■^ j -rr Cy 



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1 



WUJLUTn EVENTNTG IIE11AI.D: JAXUARY 13 1890 



COMIRCE. 



The Markets Are All Dull 
Grain and Stocks 
Today. 



for 



Gossip of the Boards; Daily 

Movement; Prices on 

Stock. 



There is ver>' little to tell about the 
wheat market today. Wires to the East 
were working badly, so there was little 
news from the outside. Xo visible sup- 
ply report could be issued today. Sales 
were eon fined to a few cars of cash and 
a little May. 

The close was dull, but steady. Cash 
No. 1 hard sold and closed at 79 for regu- 
lar. No. 1 northern regular closed at TG, 
with no bidding for on track. No. 2 
northern closed at 74. January No. 1 
hard closed at 79, nominal, and 1 north- 
ern at 7t5 nominal. May wheat sold, 
held steadily and closed at 84i^. No. 1 
northern May closed at 81 ^2> nominal. 

The Dallv Movement. 

Cars on track: Wheat, 20; corn, 17; 
oats, 3. Inspection: Wheat, 2 cars No. 
1 hard. 1 car No. 1 northern; corn 11, 
oats 7. Receipts: Wheat, 4337 bu.; 
corn, 7282 bu.; oats, 12,546 bu. Ship- 
ment3: Wheat, 1,775 bu. Minneapolis 
reported 428 cars ou track. 

Weekly Statement. 

Showing the stock of grain in store at 
Duluth (by grades) for the week ending 
Saturday, Jan. 11, 1S90: 

Bushels. 

No. 1 hard 2,250.H16 

No. 1 imrthfrn l.W-.iJu 



No.- northern 

No. 1 rwl winter 

No. ■- red winter 

No 3 spring' wheat 

No irni if 

Hi'jit-'itHl and condemned.. 
Spec-iai bin 



5l;t 

Mti 

23.21;} 

8.U0 

3.22e 

63.75i* 



THE ZENITH CITY. 

The South Shore Koiwl .SuccesHful in Mioh- 
igan Katen; Kail News. 

For the tlrst time in the history of Du- 
luth has she been given rates from the 
Easi, on a just basis. Especially is this 
true of rates from Michigan points, where 
St. Paul and Minneapolis have been al- 
lowed a rate of 82.05 tirst class and 83 
second class lower than the prices 
quoted to Duluth. The South Shore 
has tried to overcome the discrimination 
against Duluth in westbound rates. St. 
Paul and xMinneapolis have always had 
a rate a few dollars lower than the Du- 
luth rate, although the distance to Du- 
luth is less. 

Last week as noted in Friday's Herald, 
a meeting of the Michigan roads was 
held, at which C. B. Hibbard, general 
passenger agent of the Zenith City Short 
Line was present. He urged a rate to 
Duluth from Detroit and Michigan 
points, the same as now quoted to St. 
Paul and Minneapolis. This, it was 
voted to allow, and Duluth now stands 
on the same footing as the Twins. 

Mr. Hibbard was in the city Saturday 
night. "I hardly think," said he, 
"that the Eastern rate will go any lower. 
No Eastern roads will pro rate with the 
Burlington & Northern, and if they do 
not the Soo nas no need to go lower. 
However, the Zenith City line will carry 
out its policy toward these roads and 
will quote the lowest rate out of St. 
Paul." 



Total 4.3)?7,9W 

Afloat in the harbor 73,000 



Total... *.4B0,992 

Increase for the week Si-Sll 

In store a year ago 1.07^5*30 



Increa^ie a year tigo 

Ci>rn In store 

luc-reaM? forthe week 

Oats in store 

Increas«' forthe week 

W beat in store at Minneapolis. 

Wheat in store at St Paui 

I>ecrea»e wheal at Minneapolis 
Decrease wheat at St. Paul 



91.1SI 
370,325 

4H.4W 
3IB.,t01 

3;).llii 

r,ti22,lEi»J 

345,000 

o7,Nj« 

30,000 



Chlviteu (iusslp. 

The following dispatches are over the 
private wires of W. W. Bill, successor to 
Pressy, Wneeler & Lewis: 

The storms which prevailed last night, 
shutting off telegraphic communication 
with many outside points, gave us stag- 
nant markets. Wheat optened higher on 
colder weather, after whijh we had no 
news, no outside business and no fluc- 
tuations of importance. The indica- 
tions point to a decrease in visible sup- 
ply of about 530,000, which was nearly 
twice as large as generally expicted. 
The fact that this did not bull the 
market at the close seems a very weak 
indication, and we would rather expect 
lower prices tomorrow unless the ac- 
cumulation of Eastern orders which will 
reach here tonight should change the 
tendency of the market. 

Corn and provisions — No noteworthy 
trading in either. 



Satur- 
day. 



raw 



New Vurk .stocks. 

Thefollowing are closing prices on the 
New York stock exchange as reported by 
W. W. Bill Jt Co.: 

Today. 

Chica^. Burllndtondc Quincy. 107 

American ""ot ton Oil 31 

Mi-s.)uri Pa.:irt.; 73^ 

Northern P ii'iflc preferred 734 

Cbicaico. Milw^iukee & :3i. Paul., ^"i 

i^iiirir I'rusi 52^ 

Gas Tr jst 41,)^ 

Loui-\iile4 NH'^bville WJi^ 

Chicajfo i Northwestern liOH 

Koek l>laua 97 

Lake Shore .H^ifj 

Kei.liiig 364g 

Kicliiuoiid Termioal Zl% 

Atchison Sgij 

Delaware i Lackawanna.. !!!.!!l38J4 

WeMern ' nion 84!^ 

L^ad Trust auu 

Union Pacific 67U 

ou ^ 



ol\ 

47 

86i4 
111 

tt7'4 
104', 

3«Ji 

21 H 

3S\ 
137 a, 

C4', 

at', 

67 
104 'i 



THE LEA SE PER FECTED. 

Said the Leane of the \i isconsin Central 
Settled: Kail Notes. 

Negotiations have been practically 
concluded between the Northern Pacific 
and the Wisconsin Central route, where- 
by the latter line licenses a part of the 
Pacific system. The Northern Pacific 
will lease the Central and guarantee a 
rental ujwn it, which will pay the fixed 
charges and the interest up)on the in- 
come bond. The lease has not yet been 
approved by the directors of the Central 
road, but its terms have been settled, 
and it is reported that Presidents Colby 
and Oakes will at once affix their signa- 
tures to the agreement. 

The Wisconsin Central is now 
operated under a close traffic 
arrangement with the Northern 
Pacific. This traffic contract went into 
effect last May, and was for ninety-nine 
years. The lease of the Central will 
give the Northern Pacific an entrance to 
Chicago and add 829 miles to its system, 
making the road 41^34 miles in length. It 
will give the Pacific road a direct route 
from Chicago to the coast. It will also 
cause the Manitoba road either to make 
close arrangements witd a Chicago road 
or else follow the Pacific's example and 
lease a line to Lake Michigan. 

Rail NoteH. 

"The second annual meeting of 'The 
R-iilway Employes' club" of Minnesota, 
will take place in St. Paul, Tuesday, Jan. 
21. It is expected that 600 employes will 
be in attendance. The object is to pro- 
mote and protect the welfare of, and de- 
feat that which ia detrimental to the em- 
ploye. We send you our cordial greet- 
ings, and to the railway employes who 
should be enrolled among those whose 
mission is by fraternity and good faith 
to our principles to ensure that our ma- 
terial prosperity shall be protected. In 
this union among ourselves, we find 
strength to protect our personal inter- 
ests, and we shall find it in no other way. 
We desire particulary to give you and 
your associates a warm and earnest wel- 
come. Consider the matter; give it your 
best thought. The hearty co-operation 
of all employes is urged for the better- 
ment of their condition. It is hoped 
that the knowledge of this call may be 
confined to railway employes. 

One half the rock on the Union depot 
site has been blasted away. 

The Burllutston Uai< Sand. 

Minneapolis, Jan. 13.— [Special.]— 
Local Ticket Agent McElroy of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Northern claims 
to have proof that other roads are sell 
ing tickets to Chicago at less than the 
89 and SO rates, aud his road threatens 
another cut. 



DISTRICT COURT. 



Cases 



Jodge Stearnit .Hakes a Set of Jury 
for the Week— Other Notes 

The following was the slate set of cases 
which was hung up on the clerk's desk 
this morning in Judge Stearns' room: 
On trial, 128, Andrew Pretracello et al 
vs. sheriff. To follow this afternoon, No. 
127, T. B. Perry vs. H. C. Nelson. 

Tuesday- Criminal, continued from last 
term— State of Minnesota v«. Anton Scbulte; 
for keeping' saloon open on election day. Cou- 
tliiU d from last term-State of Minnetjota vs. 
Josepii H Goeheline; for assault up<jn F. P. 
Tims. Civil eases for today— Nos. 130, 135. 
Wednesday— Nos. I.*. 139, 140,' 141, 142. Thurs- 
day Nos. 1«J, U7, 148, IfiO, 15«i. Friday- Nos. 
lf.7, ISS, 15», 1«0, Its. Saturday— Nos. ItM, 166, 
1B7, It*, 170. 

Case 128 occupied nearly all day and 
is the famous fruit store case in which 
Frank Danstria skipped away from Du- 
luth and Sheriff Shawney seized his 
stock to satisfy creditors. When this 
was done Andrew Pretracello and Dom- 
inick Campanello appeared and claimed 
they had bought the business for $6,000 
some time previously and they bring suit 
against Sharvy, as sheriff, for unlawful 
seizure and sale of property. A brigan- 
dish looking Italian named Louis Doraz- 
zans was sworn in as interpreter, and a 
whole car load of diminutive and no*' over 
clean Italians were present as witnesses. 
The gentlemen are evidently not the re- 
cipients of implicit trust at the hands of 
the attorneys for a court order was is- 
sued, which consigned them to another 
room,80 that they could not hear the tes 
timony of the other witnesses. 

In the case of the state vs. Charles 
Crump, indicted for assault, the accused 
plead not guilty and was remanded to 
jail. 

Judge Ensign's <H>urt adjourned until 
tomorrow. 



EIGHT-HOU R AD VOCATES. 

Flans Uitde Yesterday for a Public Demon- 
•tratiou on Feb. 'i2. 

The Minnesota Eight-Hour league 
held an interesting meeting at Minneap 
olis yesterday. There were representa- 
tives from St. Paul, Duluth, Stillwater, 
Winona, Faribault and other industrial 
centers in the state. The delegations 
from Duluth and Winona were especi- 
ally enthusiastic. Those in attendance 
are representatives of the working peo 
pie. They say there is no doubt about 
the success of the proposed movement in 
favor of eight hours. 

C..\pplehagen, fourth vice-president of 
the Cigarmakers' Union of the United 
States, was among the delegates from 
Duluth. He is the man who, as delegate 
to the confederation of trades unions, 
fixed in a resolution May 1, 1890, as 
the time for inaugurating the eight hour 
system. There were reports from the 
different eight-hour leagues in the state. 
It has been decided to circulate more 
extensively and generally the eight- 
hour tracts, and in that way and through 
the medium of public meetings and dis- 
cussions, educate the working people 
and others in this movement. 




POWDER 

Absolutely Pure. 

This powder never varies. A marvel of pur- 
ity, strengrth and wholesomeness. More eco- 
nomical than the ordinary kinds, and 
cannot be sold in competition with the multi- 
tude of low test, short weight, alum or plios- 
phate powders. Sold only in cans. Koyai. 
Baking Powdkr Ck).. 106 Wall street. N. Y. 



PIONKR FOEL CO,, 



WEATHER FORECAST. 

Jan. 13. —Forecast for Duluth and 
vicinity for 24 hours commencinQ 10 a.m. 
today: Colder; fair weather. 

Observer, Signal Office. 



THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON, Proprietor. 



Strictly First-Class in all Appointments. 



DULUTH. 



MINN. 



A. FITGER & GO'S 



Lake Superior Brewery 



Is the largest In the State Df Mlu -xesota ou side 
of the TwIt Cltlei 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 

— .4ND— 

INSURANCE. 

Rooms I, 2, Exchange BIdg. 

DULUTH, - - MINN. 



Notice to Contfactofs. 



of- 



COAL 



CROSS CR[EK LEHICH, 

FREE BURmNG, 

AfilHRIIClIE I eilUMINOUS. 



M WOOD 

' at 



COmiELLSyiLLE 
And GAS HOUSE. 



l>ry Maple, 
Hard Mixed, 

.Slabs, 
Kdgiuifs. 



COKE 



OBDEeS PROMPTLy DELIVERED 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



Dice: Hotel St Louis, 326 W. Saperlor St 



Sealed proposals will be received at the 
flee of the uiider.-*iK'ne<l until the :i'>tli day of 
January, ix'A), for the erectiiiu and e<jtnpletlon 
of l.")0 dwelling- houses, more or less, at West 
Duluth, Minn., for the Minnei^ota Iron Car 
coiniwny, acoordluir to plans and speciflotlons 
prepared by the uridiTsijjrncd and now on tile 
athisollice. Kacli coutraclor cstiniatiiig: on 
tliiti work will be required to submit with his 
pnjpo.sal, a properly executed bond of two 
ret.pousilile sureties In the sum of S-VX) as a 
(Tuarantee that in case the ewutracti- awarded, 
he will within a reasonable time eAecute aeon- 
traet and bond satisfactory to the owners. 

Tlie owners reserve the rlifht to reject any 
or all bids. 

O. G. Tkaphaoen, 
Architect, 
Rooms 510, 511, 512 and 613 First National bank 

building:, Duluth, Minn. 





o 
o 

hi 
Q 

cc 
O 

o 

I- 

co 

\- 
z 
< 

Q. 



CREAI SACRIFICE SALE 




UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



Northern Piwlfic Short Cine. 

DDLUTH TO BITPEKIOR. 



A Carriage Repository. 

A prominent Oshkosh carriage manu- 
facturer 18 expected in the city in a few 
days to establish a repository at Duluth. 
Should he get a satisfactory location it 
ia probable that he may put in a branch 
plant for a wagon factory. 

In order to give everybody a chance 
to participate in the benefits of our 
great holiday reduction sale, I have 
decided to continue it for the balance of 
this month. Don't miss the opportunity 
to get reliable goods at away-down 
prices. Sale closes positively Friday, 
Jan. 31. Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 

Oriental Rug's. 

These goods are the moat durable, 
therefore the cheapest parlor coverings 
in the world. They are the most beauti- 
ful, therefore the most satisfactory. The 
absolute uniqueness of the design makes 
them the n^ost desirable for those who 
don't want patterns that every btxly else 
has or may have. No one can duplicate 
a genuine Turkish rug. See ad on first 
page of great sale at 28 East Superior 
street. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



The .Minneapolis Close. 

Mi.v?fEAPO[.is. Jan. 13.— Closintf quotations 



S'*-* 



No 

Mav. SJi.,; on tracli, ti<yjj>i. No. 1 northern 
January, TTS; Feb. T?'*: Mav, HVi; on 
traclt, 7-','^:y. No. 2 nonliern, January. 75; 
February 75',; May, :S;on track. 74<&76. 



1 hard, January, 79'i; Februar>', 
tracli, tiO(s}.>l. " 



Chlcugo Close. 
Cmc.^oo, Jan. 13, i ; 15 p. m. close.— Wheat 
steady. January, 77; Februarv, 77S; May, Si. 
Corn. Arm; January, 2y; .Mav, Slh. 



8!4 of ae\. 



1.755 

250 

2.250 
600 

tS7o 

10 

1 

10 



244 



REA L EST ATE. 

A Kecord of the H^at estate Transfers fot 

34 Hours, Ending at Noon. 

Wl«ccn«in, Miunesoia Je Pacific Railway 
ctirnpany to C N Nelson Lumber com- 
pany, neSiOf swi^i. 7-o«>-19; Qe^^ofswii. 
se'-.^ofse'*, section 9; nW^ of swia, 
seciion 15; nw-^of se^i. 27-oS-aO; sw!^ 
of nei*, section 7; w^i of nwi.^. sw^i, 
section 9; nw-* of ne^*, section 21; 
e^, of nei», nwi^ of n<:^. 35 .57-20 t 

Charies P i.indner to Ku^.y Nelson, lot 
19. block 4, Spal linjfj addition to Du- 
luth 

W C .■Jtearns to E L Emery, utidivided 2 
acres of w', of sw"*, ne!* of sw>i and 
lot 3, 2:l-49- 15 

S J Coffin to Hana A Sand wick, iot 7 
b^ock 1.-.. West Duluth. First division. 

C H Eldndjfe to John J Wijfijins. lot 168, 
block 4-', Duluth proper Third divi- 
sion 

Nels Hall to Peter Isaacson. 
30-49-15 

Maria L Ke<ju(ft. to L M Wiilcuts. loiu' 
St. Louis avenue, I^wer Duluth 

H S Patterson to J W NefT, lota 22 "zi, 
Eiithih street, Fouddu Lac ' 

H F Wiliiam.-on Jr to John Ware, lot 20. 
block |:0, Kiith division. West Duluth 

B A tiray to Ko()ert Louden, undivided 
5» interest In lots :JK.', *>4, St Louis ave- 
nue. Uiwer Duluth. 

e F Williamson Jr u> Paul L Chandler, 
lot ., block 111. West Duluth. Fifth di- 
vision " J 

U transf ers; tota l consideration .... 15.997 

Special Notice. 

Owing to the inclemency of the 
weather Saturday evening, the skating 
exhibition at the East End rink had to 
be postponed until tonight (Monday) 
when Walker's military band will be m 
attendance. Everjthing seems to point 
to a beautiful night and a pleasant 
time for everyone who takes this oppor- 
tunity of witnessing the performance of 
Miss Davidson on skates, and also for 
those who take advantage of such splen- 
did skating facilities as ^re to be had 
there. The ice at the rink is in perfect 
condition and should be very extensively 
patronized by the Duluth public, con- 
sidering the fact they have so long 
desired a first-claas rink, and particularly 
at this end of town. This is to be Miss 
Davidson's last appearance at this rink 
and f y who have not witnessed her 
Bkai ng should not miss this opportunity 
Reu em >er tonight at the East End 
rink lor an enjoyable 
doors. 



Lillian Lewis at the Temple Opera House; 
Notes of Plays. 

Tonight Miss Lillian Lewis will appear 
as Lena Despard in "As in a Looking 
Glass" at the Temple. Miss Lewis this 
sesison is supported by a company of un- 
usual excellence. In all cities where she 
has appeared the voice of press and 
public has bean unanimous in declaring 
the company, as an organization, to be 
on as high a plane of artistic merit as 
Daly's or the Madison Square New York 
companies. In this age of managerial 
economy. Miss Lewis deserves especial 
recognition and commendation for the 
liberality with which she stages and 
C(J8tumes her plays and magnificent 
character of her support. 

In Minneapolis last week The Pioneer 
Press, Tribune and Times all declared 
MiBs Lewis' company to be the best tnat 
had appeared in Minneapolis in many a 
day. From New York to New Orleans 
there has been but one comment, "Miss 
Lewis and her company must be classed 
among the foremost in artistic exc« Hence 
and completeness in accessories and de- 
taih" Of Miss Lewis herself the papers 
all over the country have spoken in 
terms of unbounded praise. In New 
York she waa termed the American 
Bernhardt, in Chicago the Queen of 
Emotional Actresses. The three plays 
Miss Lewis presents here are the best in 
her repertoire. 



^IT-ANTED— Box maker at Duluth Trunk 
If factory. Apply 215 West Superior 
street. 



YARD: 

Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Qarfield Avenue 
Rices Point. 



Mortgage Sale. 



For Sale 



FORI! ACRES 



-IN THE- 



EAST END 



Default having t>eon ma<le in the payment 
of ihesumnf three liundicd and sixty 5o-l(IO 
dollars, iSJeK) 50-lUli principal and interest which 
is claimed to be due at tlie diite t)f this notice 
up<in a certain mortgage duly executed and 
di livert-d by Frank Doyle, a bachelor.toJam s 
B. Howard and -■Moxander H. Davis, bearing' 
date the tenth day of Novcmlier. A. D. ImKk, 
and dulj' rect>rded In tlie office of the register 
of deeds in and for the county of Saint Louis 
and state of Minnesota, on the 12 h day of 
November A. I), l(^^^^, at 9 o'clock a. m., in 
book "2«" of mortgages, on page ii'H; and no 
action or proceeding ai law or otherwise hav- 
ing been instituted to recover the debt se- 
cure<l by said mortgage, or any part thereof: 

Now, therefore, notic-e is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a iMiwcr of sale contained in said 
m ■rtguge. and pursuant to the statute in sucli 
ease made and providi-il, the said mortgage 
will be foreclosed, and the premises descrl tied 
in aud covered by said mortgage, viz: Lots 
numliore<l >'ix itii, seven (7) and eight (8i and 
tlie northeast quarter (iieHi) of the southeast 
<iuarier (sei*) of section nnml)ered twenty-two 
i22i, all in toiviishipNo si.vty-one (lili north of 
range No. twelve (12) west of the fourth i4th) 
principal meridian, in St. Louis county, and 
state f)f .Minnesota, with tbeberedilameutsand 
appurtenaiii-ei'. will lie s<jld at public auction, 
to tile highest bidiler for ca>li, to pay said debt 
and iutere.-'t.and tlie taxes i if any Mm said prem- 
ises, 'Ud tweuty-Bve dollars, attorney's fees, 
as stipulated in and by said mortgage in case 
of foreclosure, and llie iil>liursenieuts allowed 
by law; which t-ale will be made by the sheriff 
of sa d 8t. Louis county, at the front door of 
the court house, in the city of Duluth. in said 
c«junty and state, on the 29th day 
of January, A. D. 1S!K), at IO:.T(' o'clock a ni. ou 
that day. suiiject to redemption at auj- time 
wli bin one > ear from the day of sale, ha pro- 
vided by law. 
Dated December iSth, A. D. 1889. 

James B. How.vrd, 
and 

Alkxandek H. Davis, 
R. N. Marble, Mortgajjrees. 

Attorney. 
Dec. 14-21-as. Jan. 4-11-18-25. 



Except Sunday. . . 
Kxwpt Sunday. .. 
Except Sunday. . 

Daily 

Dally 

Except Sunday... 

Daily 

Daily 

Dally 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 

Daily 

Dallv 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 



Leave 
Duluth 



Leave 
W. Sup'r 



U.IU am 

7 35 am 

8 55 am 
10 00 am 
U H'i am 

1 10 pm 
215p:n: 

3 25 pm 
3:)0pni 

4 00 pm 

4 H5 pm 

5 40 pm 
ti 45 pm 
7 16 pm 

9 26 pm 
U 10 pm 



ti 45 am 
7 55 am 
9 10 am 

10 15 am 

1 1 50 am 

1 2< pro 

2 30 pm 

3 40 pm 

3 45 pm 

4 15 pm 
4 50 pm 

6 56 pm 

7 (*> pm 
• 7 30 pm 

9 45 pm 
1127 pm 



Arrive 
Superior 



ti52 am 
8(12 am 
9 17 am 

10 22 am 

11 57 am 
1 ;i5 pm 
2 .37 pm 

3 47 pm 

4*2.5 piii 

4 57 pm 
0:2 pm 
7 07 pm 



115^3 pm 



SCPKIUOB TO DITLCTH. 



Leave ■ Leave 
Superior, W. Sup'r 



Daily 

Except Sunday . . . 

Daily 

BUcept Sunday.. 
Elxeept Sunday... 

Dally 

Daily 

Uailv 

Except Sunday. .. 

Daily 

Daily 

Dally 

I Dally 

Rxcept Sunday. .. 

Dally 

Kxcept Sunday. .. 



W am! 7 



8 10 am 

9 25 am 

10 4i am 

1 1 U5 am 

12 35 pm 

1 45 pm 

2 60 pm! 
4 05 pm! 

6 05 pm 

fi 10 pm I 

7 20 pm: 
11 45 pm! 



K46 am 
07 am 
7 40 am 
817 am 
9 32 am 

10 55 am 

1 1 15 am 

12 42 pm 
1 52 pm 

3 0<i pm 

4 15 pm 
6 12 pm 
KlOpm 

6 17 pm 

7 30 pm 
11 52 pm 




Will continue Fifteen Days— until stock is re- 
duced. Cost or worth cuts no figure. WE 

MUST REDUCE, even at a great loss. 

Our low prices have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Business Existence." Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock; besides, 
you w oiild not stop to read them, but will quote 
a few to give you an idea. 

$7.49 buys an elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least S I 6. 

$9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $ I 8. 

The same reductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 
Furnishi ng Csfoods. No reserve We must reduce 
our Steele at least $i 5,000 (thirty-five thousand 
dollars.) Mild weather leaves us overstocked 
and compels us to take the loss. Call and see 
our pric2s. 



M. S. BURROWS & CO. 




€» 



(0 





/ 



Duluth, South .Shore an<l Atlantic, 

Leaves Duluth daily 930 pir 

Arrives Kepublic, Mich '.''. 8 37 am 

Arrives Ishpeiuiug, Mich 725air 

Arrives Negauiiee, .M ich 7 ;J5 mu 

Airives Manjuette. Mich 805 am 

Arrives Sault Sle. Marie, Mich 1 a", imi 

Arrives Ottawa, Ont n 45 am 

Arrives Montreal, Que 330pin 

8ao am 



Arrives Boston, Mass. 



Airives New York, N. Y. 
Arrives Detroit, Mich... 



' 00 am 
.11 10 am 



Chicago, SU Paul. MinneapoLU 
Railw^T. 



St Omaha 



Ex Sunday 


DaUy. 


Leave Duluth 10 45 'am 


10 00 pm 
10 25 pm 
10 35 pm 
7 J am 
«65 am 
7 35 am 


Leave West Superior. ..> 11 10 am 

Leave Superior 11 80 am 

Arrive Stillwater 632pm 

ArriveSt. Paul 00 pm 

Arrive Minneapolis 6 40 pm 




Chicago lo- 
cal, dally 


Leave Duluth 

Leave West Superior 

Leave Superior 


10 46 am 

11 10 am 
11 30 am 

5 10 pm 

6 50 pm 
1 39 am 

7 40 am 
7 00 am 


Arrive Chippewa Falls 

Arrive Eau Claire 

.•\rfivc .Madison 

Arrive .Milwaukee 

Arrive Cnicago 


Trains arrive at Duluth. Daily. 

I-rom Eau Claire, and Chi.ago 6 25 pm 

l'iombt.PaulandMiuneapolis.7 00 am & 625 pm 
Gfokoe M. Smith, Gen'l Agt., 



REALiy 




NO SUCH 




8 3d am 

9 4^ am 
11 10 am 

11 30 am 
100 pm 

2 07 pm 

3 15 pm 

4 30 pin 

5 30 pm 

6 25 pip 

6 35 pm 

7 45 pn. 

12 10 um 



St. Paul St Uulath Short Line. 

Duluth to West 

Superior 'OSS +800 8 45 MO 30 '18 00 am 

Ouiuth to West 

Superior •2 40 446*+580 •660*+1000pm 

West Superior 

to Duluth +«610 nss 9 30*^10 15 "ll 16 am 

West Superior 

to Duluth •2 00 t240 3 50 •5 45 •+« 10 •9 10 pm 

•Daily. nVest Duluth only. 

I^eave Duluth dally for Spirit Lake— 9:00 am, 
,^30 p m; returulnK at 10:05 am and Ipm. 



St. Paul & Duluth Railroad. 



Duluth & Iron Kan|;e Kailroad. 

Commencing Dec. 15. 1889, Duluth & "Iron 
Range railroad passenger trains will arrive 
and depart from t.'iiion depot. Duluth, dally 
Sundays excepted, as follows: 
No. 1, leave Lniou depot for Tower 

and Ely 310pm 

No. 2, arrive Union depot from Tower 

fuJ Ely 1202am 

treight trains arrive and depart from En- 
dioii station a.s follows: 

Kiidion 960am 



Arrive 
Duluth 

7 05 am 

7 23 am 

7 55 am ( No. 3, leave 



BARGA 



/ 



No. 4, arrive Endion 6 06pm 

8CBUKBAN TKAINB— OOIKO NOKTH 

Daily except Sundays. 

Leave Union Depot— 6:.'io, 7:4.5, S:40, 9:36 a 
rn.; 12:1.5,1:45,2:45, 4:10, 6:05, 0:10, 8:05, 10:00 
11:20 p. m. 

Sunday trains leave Union dei>ot 9:30. a m . 
12:3.\ :;:00. 3:20. 5:3<J, 6:30.8:15 p. m. 

GOING SOUTH. 

Dally except Sundays. 

Leave Lester Park— 6:20. 7:20. 8:16. 0:10 and 
10:15a.m.; 1:15,2:15. 3:40. 4:35.6:35, 7:40, 8:36 
and 10::{0p.m. 

Sunday trains leave Lester Park 10 a. m..l:06 
2:50. 5:00. t>:00 an.! 7:45 p in 



Notice to Contractofs. 



evening out of 



For 



quick sales list your property 
with Merritt &, Leddell, room 4, Fargus- 
Bon building. 

In order to give everybody a chance 
to participate in the benefits of our 
great holiday reduction sale, I have 
decided to continue it for the balance of 
this month. Don't miss the opportunity 
to get reliable goods at away -down 
prices. Sale closes positively Friday, 
Jan. 31. Andrew Jackson, jeweler. 



Temple Opera Notes. 

Lillian Lewis begins a three nights' 
engagement at the Temple this evening. 
Her repertoire will \m ".\rticle 47," "As 
in a Lfxiking glass" and "The New Mag- 
dalen." 

Kiralfy's great spectacular "Antiope" 
is booked at Temple Opera for Fridav 
and Saturday of this week. Next week 
"Zig Zag" comes for the 27th and 28th. 

Says the Troy Telegram: Last even- 
ing there was a pretty scene at the 
Griswold Opera house. A handsome and 
elaborate basket of Howers was given to 
Miss Lewis at the beginning of the third 
act. The basket bore a figurepiece, a 
graceful swan of bhish, tuber and tea 
roses, bearing in its bill a scarlet and 
white jockey cap and a silver-handled 
whip. The tribute to the beautiful star's 
genius was the gift of the Trotting asso- 
ciation of London, Ont. 

Manager Haycock has cancelled the 
"Antiope" engagement. 

The Duluth dates of the Casino Opera 
company have been changed to early in 
May. 

The Lillian Lewis company is at The 
Spalding. 

Mr. Ed. Liewald takes the position of 
bass violinist in the Temple Opera in 
place of Mr. Ericson who has accepted a 
position in St. Paul. 



AT A 



Bargain. 



Sealed proiiosals will be received until 2 
o'clock p. m., January 3tlth, 1890, bv K. K. Jef- 
ferson, chairman of committee on' court house 
and county jail, for the cell work In the new 
county jail, in accordance with [lians. sjiecitl- 
cations drawn by O G. Traphagen, architect, 
on file at tlie <jince of the county auditor. 

HiddiTS will S|iecify what quality and 
sstreugth of ciirame steel they projiose to use, 
and submit sample of same. They will also 
submit drawings or samples of locks and bars 
tliey propose to use, and all mechanical de- 
vices connected with the cells. 

Each proposal must be accompanied with a 
check for Ave hundred dollars to lie forfeited 
to St Louis county, in the event that the pro- 
posal which said check accompanies shtll tie 
accepted by the county commissioners, and 
that the |>erson making the proposal shall fall 
to comply with its terms 

Address all proposals to E. R. Jefferson, In 
care of county auditor, Duluth, Minn. For 
further Information apply to 

JOH» F. SCIILBnNE.>i, 

Superintendent, Duluth, Minn. 
The commissioners reserve the rignt to re- 
ject any and all proposals. 
Dec 14-18-21-24-28Jau 1-4-8-11-16-18-28. 



. eave Duluth 

ArriveSt. Paul... 
Ar Minneapolis.. 

Ar Stillwater 

Ar Milwaukee 

Ar Chicago 

ArSt. Louis 

Ar Kansas Citv. .. 



SE 


C 1 


&8g-? 


S 


'fl'O —B 


ii 




: COB 


•I 


;: DHHg 




8 00 am 


210 pm 


2 :» pm 


<> 55 pm 


2 55 pm 


7 20 pm 


3 ») pm 


7 05 pm 


4 15 am 


6 46 am 


7 <.0 am 


9 30 am ^ 


5 05 pm 


6 05 pm 


4 45 pm 


4 45 pm 



Sicr 






10 00 pm 

6 55 am 

7 15 am 

7 00 am 
+7 06 pm 
■f' 00 pm 

am 

8 45 am 



Ka»t«rn Minnesota Railway. 

To St. Paul and Mi ineapolls. Buffet parlor 
curs. Buffet sleeping cars. 

SOUTH BOUND. 

Except Sunday. 
X12.20 p ni 



Leave Duluth... 
Arrive Minneapolis.. 

Arrive i~t. Paul 

Arrive Chicago 

Ariire i^t. Louis 

Arrive Kansas City. 
X Dinner served. 



5:50 p rn 
6:20 p m 
9:30 a m 
6:05 p m 
4:46 p m 



Daily. 

10:45 p m 
•i:40 a m 
7:10 a m 

10:00 p m 
9:20 a m 
8:45 a m 



.+Excet)t Sunday— to other points daily. 



V rthern Pa<inc Railroad. 



Dining Cars on Pacific 
Express Trains. 



Grand .Skating Tonrnament. 

A grand skating tournament will take 
place Saturday evening, Jan. 18, at the 
West End Parlor Skating rink. Twenty- 
first avenue west and Superior street, 
between twelve young latlies. A fine 
gold mel il will be awarded to the win- 
ner. Four competent judges will be on 
hand to award the prize. Walkers Mili- 
tary band will be on hand. Everybody 
should try and attend as it will be the 
finest match ever seen in Duluth. Ad- 
mission, gents, 2.5c; ladies, 15c; children. 
1^. The match will take place at 9 
o^lock sharp. Medal can be seen at 
rink. T. M. Eruson, Prop. 

Capt. S. G. Johnson, Manager. 



Tefins - Very - Advantageous, 



WANTED at once, a gtx>d housekeeper. 
Skandinavian. Call at 110 St. Croix ave- 



NOTES 



from the diary of tourists, com- 
mercial travelers, business 
men aud others has revealed : 

That the WiscoNsi.N Ce.vtral have the un 
qualified endorsement of all; 



Pacific Express (limited) for 
Fargo, Helena, Butte, Ta- 
coma, Seattle and Portland, 
Grand Forks. Grafton, Win-I 



Ixiave Arrive 
Duluth Duluth 
Dallj-. j Dally 



nipeg 

Dakota Express, for Fergus 
Falls, wahpeton, "argo, 
Jamestown and lutermedliite 
IKilnts 

Chicago Express, for Ashland. 
Milwaukee. Chicago and all 
Wi.iiconsln Central and Mil- 
waukee, Lake Shore Jfe West- 
ern points 



[3.30 pm 



6.25 pm 



7.16 pm 



4.00 pm 



r.SS am 



l0.30aD> 



All trains dally. Through sleeper froi» 
Duluth on Dakota express leaving at 7:15 p 
m. Free Colonist Sleepers ar* run on Pacini. 
Express leaving Duluth at 3::fO p. m. 

JNO. C HOBINI-O.V. 
Ticket Agent. Union Depot. 



NOBTH BOUND. 

Except Sunday. Dallv. 

Leave St. Paul x4:00pm 10:30 p in 

Leave Minneapolis 4:20 pm 11:15 pm 

Arrive I>uluth 10:00 p m 7:30 am 

X Supper served. 

Secure sleeplnir berths and tickets at Union 
ticket ollice, Uti West Sup«'rior street, or depot, 
corner Sivih iivc. west :iiid Miihigan street. 



SCIENTinCAMERICAN 

-^^ >ESTABUSHED 1845. >..* 



Is the oldest and most popular nclentlflc ODd 
Boechftnica! papier p\ihlishe(1 and has the largeet 
circulation of any pnpc r of its clans in the world 
Fully illustrated. Best ciaas of Wood Encrar- 
Inga. I*ublished weekly. Send for sppcimen 
copy. Price 13 a year. Four months' trial, tl. 
MU>(N & CO., Publishers, 361 Broadway, N T 

ARCHITECTS^ BUILDERQ 
Edition of Scientific American. O 

A great success. Kach Issue contains colored 
UthoKraphic plates of country and city residen- 
ce* or public buildintrs. Numerous enKravings 
and full plans and f pecttleations for tlie use of 
such as contemplate tmildinK. Price $2.,'iO a year, 
Kcts. acupy. MLN.N A CO., PUBlliiHKKS. 



Are to be found among 

Duluth Real Estate 



/ 





E - IN - W[ST - 



-AND THE 



EAST -:- 




I may be secnr- 
|ed by apply- 
inur to MlTNN 
) .t Co., who 
have had over 
40 years' experience and have made over 
l(X),0(lll applications for American aud For- 
1 eiifn patents. Send for Ilandtiook. Correa- 
poDdence strictly conQdeiitial. 

TRADE MARKS. 

In case your mark Is not replslered In the Pat- 
ent Olfire, apply to Mun.n 4 Co., and procure 
Immediate protection. Bend for Uaudbouk. 

COPYRHIITTS for books, charts, map*, 
•to., quickly procured. Address 

BtCNN & CO., Patent Sellcltora. 
OxMxtULL Oxncx: Kl Bsoaxiwat, N. T 



ISi^Acreage near the city 
imits at below market prices. 



ADDRESS 



- 9 



Care of Herald, Duluth. 



That the Wisconsin Central has to-day the 
most iHjpular line between Minneapolis, 
ST. Paul, Dui.UTH. Ashland and Milwao- 
KXK. and Chicaqo : 



That the Wisconsin Central is dally adding 
tolls admirers as the recognized Pullman 
line between Min.naepolis, St. Paol, I)u 
LUTH, Ashland, and -Milwaukee and Chi- 
caqo: 

That the Wisconsin Central touches the 
most prominent points In Wisconsin, and 
and that it has more ImfKirtant biisin ss cen- 
ters on its through line than any other rail- 
way in the Northwest: 



That the Wisconsin Ckntral has made envi- 
able reputation with Its peerless Dining Car 
Service: 



That the Wisconsin Central runs fast trains 
on which all classes of passengers are carried 
with commodious and distinct accomodations 
for all : 



That the Wisconsin Central has representa- 
tives distributed throughout the country, 
who will cheerfully give any Information 
that may be desired and that its terminal 
Agents are specially Instructed to liHik after 
the comfort of passengers who may be rout- 
ed via its ilae. 



For detailed information, apply to your near 
e.«'. 'iK.iei AKcnt or to representatives of th 
road. 



H. C. Barix>w 



8. K. Ainslie, 

General Manager. 
L0CI8 Eckstein, Asst. Oeui, 
Aft.. Milwaukee. Wis. 



OenL Traftlc Manager. 
Passr. and T'kt 



PORTRAITS! 

A UFE-Sl^millT GfvSmWITnvlf PURCHASE 

OF $ I 5 OR OVER. 

Cojnmencing Monday, JAN. I 3, and continuing for a short 
time only, we will give away to every customer buying goods 
amounting to $ I 5 or over, a life-size Portrait of himself or any 
other person whom he may wish, guaranteeing the work to be 
perfect in every respect, as samples in our window will prove. 
This, in connection with our 

Red Figure Mark - Down Sale 

Gives you more than all the profit, but, as in the past, we are 
BOUND to be FOREMOST and LIBERAL, always giving you 
the BEST goods at the LOWEST prices, and something well 
worth having to remember us by besides. 



Lots 




West Du 



That are unheard of bargains 



ACREAGE -:- 



That cannot be excelled by any agent 
^ the city. 




^iKDiim 



ADDRESS 




WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 





\ 




— J 


















_ 








._ 


^ 




• 






i 
























4 — — — , 






i 






J 












...J 








.k 




J 




. i w » 111 fm IB 



SB! 



I 



1 



VSTTSssTTrst^rr: 



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axMm. n il I J i« 



1 



T-^- 



•^■^r 



~^ 





\ 




DULUTH EVENING HERALD 



<» 



1 




FOK BARGAINS 




—8KB— 


E. 


C. HOLLIDAY, 




326 W. Superior Street. 




HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILDING. 


1 



VOL. 7; ]SO. 242. 



DULUTH, MINN., TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1890. 



PBICB THB££ CICNTS. 








P^-4 ^-^ 




GLASS BLOCK STORE. 



lie, lie, 120 West Supeiioi Street, 



The first day of our Great Clearance Sale previous to stock- 
I taking proved a gigantic success. 




/ 



\ 



- Stocks - Are - Entirely - Too - Heavy 



And must be unloaded. The Greatest Bargains ever given 
to the people are now being offered at our Bargain Empor- 
iunn. 



u* 



COST NO OBJECT--M GOODS MOST BE SOLD, 



► 111 « ai^i 



I 



Read the follov^ing bargains. Juage whether they are cheap 
or not. If you haven't the money, borrow it and come to the 
GLASS BLOCK STORE and buy yourselves rich. Remember 
the following is only a sample of the thousands of bargains we 
are giving: 



J LOT OF 




15 CIS. 



Worth 50c per pair. 



\ 



Brf> j^^^ta^ 







I t 



I ! 



k. 





*, 



_U ' 



H. 



MUSLIN UNDERWEAR. 

Your pick of Ladies' Chemise, Night Gowns, Drawers, Corset Covers and 
Skirts, worth 75c, 85c, 89c, 95c and $1.00. Take them while they last for 
50c. 

A grand assortment of Chemise, worth 69c, for 39c. 

Corset Covers for 15c, lace-trimmed. 

50 Dozen Ladies' Wool Hose, worth 29c to 39c. Take them while they 
last for 19c per pair. 

WOOL UNDERWEAR. 

Lot I. Children's Merino Underwear. Pick I 5c, worth 25c. 

Lot 2. Children's Natural and Scarlet Wool Underwear. 25c, worth 50c. 

Lot 3. Children's Natural and Scarlet Wool Underwear, 48c, worth 89c. 

LADIES' UNDERWEAR. 

39c each for Ladies' Merino Underwear, worth 65c and 75c. 

SCARLET WOOL AND MEDICATED. 

75c Each for your choice of our best Scarlet Wool Underwear, ribbed and 
hemmed bottoms, sold all over for $ 1 .25 and $ 1 .39. To make them go fast, 
75c. 

MITTENS. 

Ladies' Kid Mittens and Gloves, 95c, worth $1.50. 
Ladies' Wool Mittens for 25c, worth 39c and 45c. 
Ladies' Fancy Saxony Mittens, 50c, worth 75c and 95c. 
Children's Mitts at lOc, I 5c and 20c, worth just double. 

GENT'S UNDERWEAR. 

59c for Cent's Scarlet Underwear, worth $ 1 .25. 

$1 .00 for Gent's Fine Wool Underwear, worth $1 .75. 

FUR- DEPARTMENT. 

50 Seal Caps for Ladies or Gentlemen, at $10; sold elsewhere for $16 
and $16. 

COMFORTERS. 

150 Comforters, worth $1, for 75c. 
96 Comforters, worth $1 .25, for 80c. 
63 Comforters, worth $ 1 .50, for S 1 .00. 
51 Comlorters, worth $1 .65, for $1.10. 

SATEENS. 

READ CAREFULLY. We mean just what we say. Our entire stock of 
FRENCH Sateens, worth 35c and 45c; while they last, your pick for 12 l-2c 
per yard. 

PRINTS. 

4 I -2c per yvrd for your choice of 200 pieces Standard Prints, worth 7c. 

LINEN DEPARTMENT. 

37c Per yard for full bleached Damasks, worth 50c. 
49c for Damasks formerly sold for 65c. 
55c for Damasks formerly sold for 75c. 
65c for Damasks formerly sold for 85c. 

FLANNELS. 

lOc per yard for our regular 15c Flannels. 
12 l-2c " " " 20c " 

21c " " " 30c •• 

25c " " " 35c " 

36c " " " 45c " 

CARPETS. 



i 



i .• 



4-Frame Body Brussels, made, laid and lined for 93c. 
6-Frame Bodies made, laid and lined for $1.15. 






I 




It 




All our Remnants of Tapestries, worth 65c, 75c, 85c and 95c. Pick of 
the lot for 50c per yard. 

CLOAKS! SHAWLS! WRAPS. 

$25 Plush Cloaks now $1.5. 
|28.5t3 Plush Cloaks now $18.75. 
$15 Beaver Newmarkets now Sl.-JO. 
Children's Ctoaks at nearly half price. 

MILLINERY DEPARTMENT. 

lOc Each for Pelt Hats, worth 50c to 75c. 
.50c Each for Felt ilats, worth 95c to §1.25. 

OUR CANDY DEPARTMENT 

To be closed out to make room for stationery, etc. FRENCH CREAMS, 
REGULAR PRICE, 40c; NOW 15c. 



I- 



Bargains in every department of our great store until Feb. I . 

Come now while our selection is large and unbroken. 

Bring this along and secure the bargains. 




N & WAISON 



LAST [DIT 




UL BIC[ CEIS lUERE. 



The Millionaire Owner of the 

Zenith City Line a 

Senator. 



Uproarious Scenes at the Nom- 
ination in Columbus 
Today. 



A Brief Sketch of the Rainbow 

Chaser, Successful 

at Last. 



Columbus, O., Jan. 14. — Calvin S. 
Brice was today at noon elected to the 
United States senate, receiving a major- 
ity of all votes of either branch of the 
legislat are. 

In the senate. Shaw of the Lima dis- 
trict nouiuated Brice; Gaumer of Zanes- 
ville, seconded the nomination, saying 
the nomine^e was a brave soldier in time 
of war and a brilliant statesman in time 
of peace. Schneider of Cincinnati, nom- 
inated Murat Halstead. It was received 
with cheers, hisses and laughter. The 
presiding otJQcer gave notice that a repe- 
tition of the disorder would lead to a 
clearance of the lobby. Massie of Chil- 
licothe, nominated ex-Governor F^ostor. 

The vote in the senate was: Hal- 
stead, 1; Foster, 14, and Brice, 19. In 
the house a call was demanded to bring 
in members. Brown (dem.) of Hancock, 
who is sick, was carried to the hall in a 
chair. The only other democrats ab- 
sent were Troeger of Holmes, and Law- 
lor of Franklin, who is ill. Willis and 
Blair (reps.) were absent. Hill of San- 
dusky, presented the name of Calvin S. 
Brice, which was seconded by Belleville 
of Montgomery. Representative Braman 
named Charles Foster, which was 
seconded by Rejiresentative Laylin. On 
roll call a vote of counties for Brice was 
received with cheers as was also that of 
Munson, two of whose members 
were credited with being tolters. Sn.ith, 
the third caucus bolter, voted for L. T. 
Neal. His vote was received with a sub 
dued murmer. Pennell, a strong Brice 
man and worker, voted for Foster by 
mistake, and before he could make a cor- 
rection the house was in an uproar, 
while threats were made that the hall 
would have to be cleared unless order 
was maintained. Vote in the house 
stood: Brice 57, Foster 52 and Neal 1. 
Brice wns declared the choice of the 
house. 

The result will be canvassed by the 
senate and house in joint sessioH tomor- 
row. The joint result of the two 
branches is: Brice 76, Foster G6, Hal- 
stead 1 and Xeal 15. 

Cal Brice has been making his canvass 
for the senatorship in a silk hat, broad- 
cloth coat and patent-leather boots. He 
cuts a different figure now than he did 
nine years ago. He was building the 
Ohio Central railroad, out of which he 
got his start in 1880, and he used to come 
around the Ohio state capitol with his 
pantaloons in his boots, a coat spattered 
with mud and a slouch hat. He worked 
with a will and came up to Columbus to 
scheme for millions with Charley Foster, 
who was then governor. Brice lost in 
the tirst instance on the Ohio Central, 
and when it was done he owed Foster 
$115,0W). Foster, however, had confi- 
dence in him, and the result of the plot- 
tings was that they ran a branch from 
the Ohio Central into the great coal 
tields of the Sunday Creek valley. This 
branch paid so well that Brice was able 
to pay Foster and to have 81.35,000 left. 

It was after this that he originated the 
Nickle Plate scheme, pushed it through 
and made, in connection with several 
others, about §13,000,000. Since then he 
has continued his railroad speculations, 
has lost some money and made more. 
He, with Gen. Thomas, was the origina- 
tor of the Duluth, South Shore & At- 
lantic, out of which they made, and are 
making, a great deal of money. 

He moved long ago from Ohio to New 
York. He is worth at least 85,000,000. 
All his prosperity has come within the 
past ten years, and a decade ago he was 
a red-whiskered, blue-eyed lawyer of 30 
odd years, on the ragged edge of a 
country practice. 

Brice is very charitable. He went to 
school at Miami University, and has 
given 85000 to that school, and offered, 
that if the state appropiates any sum of 
money for the college he will add an 
equal amount. Mrs. Brice is as charit- 
able as her husband. She is a trustee 
of the Western Seminary, and is the 
only woman who has ever been on its 
boards. She gave 8.VXX) to this institu- 
tion not long ago and is always giving. 

No New Trial. 
Chicago, Jan. 14. — Judge McConnell 
this afternoon granted the application 
of Kunze for a new trial, but denied the 
motion as to the other defendants, 
Coughlin, Burke and O'SuUivan. 



Stanley at Cairo. 
Cairo, Jan. 14. — Henry M. Stanley and 
his party did not stop over at Suez as it 
was reported they would, but proceeded 
for this city, where they arrived this 
morning. They were greeted upon their 
arrival here by Gen. Sir Francis Gren- 
fell, commander of the Egyptian troops, 
and Sir Evelyn Baring, the British con- 
sul general. 

Fire at Kailway Speed. 
St. Louis, Jan. 14. — While a cotton 
laden train was running from Perry to 
Harrison station on the Houston & Texas 
Central railroad in Texas the cotton 
took fire and the train rushed into the 
latter station with a long and furious 
stream of flame following it. The depot 
caught fire from it and several cars and 
200 bales of cotton were consumed. 



Over $-.!U(>,UOO ill Counterfeits. 
CiTY OF Me.\ico, Jan. 14. — A large 
gang of counterfeiters were arrested at 
Teuhacan. Several members of the 
gang had been taken into custody a few 
days before. Over 8200,000 in counter- 
feit money was seized. 

Tlia Mexicans by Storaa. 
City of Mkxioo, Jan. 14. — Patti and 
Tamagno are creating a great deal of ex- 
citement and are meeting with great 
favor. 



I can sell a few choice properties on 
Central and Grand avenueson small cash 
payments to good parties. 

John D. Gu-l, 
over Postoffice, Duluth. 






SAYS TH EY WIL L SHOOT. 

But They Probably Will Do Nothing of 
the Kind; Colored Men Meet. 

Chicvoo, Jan. 14. — Delegates to the 
national convention of the colored race, 
which has been called to assemble in 
this city tomorrow, are coming in, and 
the indications are that the gathering 
will be largely attended. 

Rumors are current to the effect that 
the opposition element will attempt to 
capture the body, and tonight there will 
be a meeting of the committee of ar- 
rangements at which stringent regula- 
tions regarding credentials will be 
adopted. Considerable feeling has been 
aroused as the result of a printed inter- 
view with one of the Cincinnati dele- 
gates in which he is represented as say- 
ing that the convention will arrange the 
details for an organization in every 
state which shall arouse the people to 
such a degree that the colored element 
would revolt and shoot, if it cannot ob- 
tain its rights in any other way. 

A WOMAN IN IT 

And She a Clairvoyant; the Toledo For- 
gery Promises Sensations. 

ToLF.DO, Ohio, Jan. 14.— The alleged 
forgery case of iRJO.iXX) of two notes on 
Richard Brown, has developed some very 
sensational features. "Miss Blythe," 
whom Lamb claimed to be ajrelative, for 
whom he was transacting financial busi- 
ness, is apparently a myth. It is de- 
veloped that the forgery, if it be one, 
centers about a somewhat noted female 
clairvoyant, magnetic healer and astrolo- 
gist with whom Lamb had been inti- 
mate, it is said, for a year or more, and 
the drift of opinion seems to be that 
she has made a dupe of him in the mat- 
ter. No arrests have yet been made. 

The story of the two forged notes has 
aroused public attention here. Joseph 
Lamb, the payee of one of the notes, is 
cashier of the United States Express 
company's office. He says that "Miss 
Blythe," the payee of the other forged 
note, is a distant relation of his, living in 
Cleveland and who made arrangements 
with him whereby he was to take charge 
of. The money was partly given, she 
said, in consideration for a care of an im- 
becile child of Mr. Brown's first wife 
which she, (Miss Blythe) had nursed and 
reared. It is evident that the whole 
story is not yet out. 

THE BERRY CROP. 

A Keiuarably Karly Crop of Sti-awberries 
lu South Carolina. 

Chakle-ston, S. C, Jan. 14.— A crate 
of strawberries was shipped hence to 
New York last night. They were grown 
in a Held in the suburbs and in the open 
air. Should warm weather continue a 
week or more the annual strawberry 
crop will be ready for marketing. Straw- 
berry season here opens generally about 
March or April, but the fruit is now rip- 
ening rapidly and the entire crop, which 
aggregates about a million quarts, will 
be harvested before the first of March 
unless a blizzard comes along. 



Served 'Em Right— They Ate Pork. 

Nef.nah, Wis., Jan. 14. — The first case 
of trichiniofiis that Neenah has ever had 
has developed. The family affected had 
been visiting relatives in Calumet county 
and on tneir return brought some pork, 
of which they all partook freely. After 
eating it they were seized with all the 
symptoms — excessive vomiting, purging 
and frothing at the mouth. One has 
died and the others are in a precarious 
condition. 



Damage in Small Towns. 
Chicago, Jan. 14. —Dispatches from 
many small interior towns in Illinois and 
Indiana report considerable damage 
done by the great wind storm of Sunday 
night. Fences, outbuildings, orchards, 
etc.. in the path of the gale were leveled 
and many farm houses were badly dam- 
aged. Telegraph and telephone wires 
were prostrated in all directions. Few 
casualties are reported. 

A Derelict Crew. 

SAJf Francisco, Jan. 14. —T. J. Blaken- 
ly, supeaintendent of the life saving ser- 
vice on the Pacific coast, has ordered an 
official investigation of the conduct of 
the crew of the Golden Gate Park life- 
saving station on the night of January .3, 
when a fisherman, who was clinging to 
the rocks at Point Bonita, was saved by 
a tug boat which had been sent to his 
rescue by the newspaper. Examiner. 

Wealth to a Deserving Man. 

Cakthage, 111., Jan. 14. — Cicero Roll, 
relative of Charles Roll, Newark, N. J., 
who recently found an old Indian title 
to a large tract of land in Mohawk 
valley, is a laboring man of this \-illage, 
and a hard, honest worker. He has re- 
ceived advice that he is a joint heir, and 
that the property to be contested is 
worth about 86,000,000. He will go East 
to look into the matter. 



To Improve the Militia. 
Chicago, Jan. 14.- A conference of the 
adjutant generals of the Northwestern 
states, including Michigan, Wisconsin, 
Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota and Indiana, 
opened today at the Grand Pacific. The 
purpose is to discuss affairs relating to 
state militia, with a view to the securing 
of greater uniformity in the drill and 
rife practice and qualifications in the 
national guard of the various states. 

To Subsidize Ships. 
Washington, Jan. 14. — The Pan 
American congress today takes up the 
question of steamship communication 
and the American delegates w 11 en- 
deavor to secure the endoisement of 
steamship subsidies as the chief thing 
needful to foster trade between North 
and South America. Some of the for- 
eign delegates are said to entertain dif- 
ferent views and the debate on the 
question will be an animated one. 

A Hard Job. 

Oi'ORTo, Portugal, Jan. 14. — Noisy 
crowds wandered through the streets 
last night, cheering for independence 
and the integrity of Portugal and shout- 
ing "Down with England!" A crowd at- 
tacked and stoned the British consulate. 
The authorities have since placed a po- 
lice guard at the consulate to protect it 
from other molestation. 



A Storm Moves. 
Wilmington, Jan. 14. — Storm which 
was central north of Lake Ontario yes- 
terday morning has moved Northeast- 
ward to Nova Scotia. It was accom- 
panied by heavy gales in lower lake 
region and by high winds on the Atlan- 
tic coast last night. 

Only $4U on Hand. 

Salt Lake, Utah, Jan. 14. — The terri- 
torial legislature met. The governor's 
message refers principally to territorial 
affairs. The auditor's report shows 
8185,097 of warrants in circulation and 
the treasurer reports $39.73 cash on 
band. 

The Weather. 
Washington, Jan. 14. — Forecast till 8 
a. ra. Wednesday: For North and South 
Dakota: Light snow, northeasterly 
winds, warmer. For Minnesota: Light 
snow in stiuthern portion, fair in north- 
ern portion, easterly winds, warmer. 



TT- 



^ I .L i »J ■- >■■■ S ' t ■ 



trji «■ j ' j ■ 



■. -, j p i *f . 



WHERE WENT THE CO? 



Exposure in Cleveland of Steal- 
ings Amounting to 
$3,000,000. 



Two Years Ago City Treasurer 

Axworthy Skipped; 

Now This. 



Considering a Case of Life and 
Death Among Rail- 
ways. 



* 



Cleveland, Ohio., Jan. 14.— A morn- 
ing paper publishes a statement show- 
ing irregularities in the old accounts of 
the city of Cleveland, aggregating about 
$3,000,000. Nearly all this money was 
paid out by the city without approval of 
the council, although the laws distinctly 
require every claim to be included in the 
regular claims ordinance. The publica- 
tion creates great sensation. 

Ex-President Lembeck gives the press 
a complete statement of the irregulari- 
ties occurring durmg the period named. 
It showed that 8.3,000,000 had been paid 
out without approval of the council and 
iu a most peculiar manner. Entries upon 
the b(X)ks were all made in a misleading 
and uncertain way. 

The most startling feature of the re- 
port is a table showing that 81,000,000 or 
8-,iKX),000 were paid out, and it is as- 
serted to have been paid out without 
any entry in any book to show to whom 
the money was paid or for what pur- 
pose. 

LIFE AND D EATH. 

Railway Magnates in New York Consifler. 
lug Northwestern (ompetltion. 

New York, Jan. 14. — Twenty-two 
railroad magnates are gathered around 
a big oak table in a room of the New- 
York Life Insurance building this morn- 
ing. The doors are locked with a sentry 
on the outside and another within. The 
twenty -four men are the presidents of 
as many lines, comprising the Interstate 
Comnjerce Railway association, and on 
the outcome of their deliberations de- 
pends the question of the immediate 
future of the Western roads. 

There is no questioning the fact that 
the present outlook is a serious one and 
that one of the most disastrous passen- 
ger and freight wars in the history of 
the country appears to be imminent. 
The basis of the trouble is the traffic 
agreement between the Chicago & 
Northwestern and Union Pacific roads, 
which is now in operation. It is claimed 
that this agreement is in violation of the 
principles of the association, and unless 
Arbitrator Walker, who is to render his 
decision today, takes the same ground, 
the Burlington, Rock Island, Atchison 
and Milwaukee & St. Paul roads will cut 
loose from the association and start in 
to look out for their individual interests. 
In this event there will be months of 
disastrous competition. 

The question is the most serious one 
with which the railroad magnates have 
been called upon to grapple for many 
years. 

The following gentlemen were present 
when the session opened this morning: 
A. B. Stickney, Kansas City line; Mar- 
vin Hughitt, Chicago & Northwestern; 
W. H. Newman, Chicago &, Northwest- 
ern; Charles Francis Adams, Union Pa- 
cific; Roswell Miller, Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul; R. R. Cable, Rock Island; H. 
H. Clark, Missouri Pacific: Samuel Bar- 
low, Wisconsin Central; O. D. Ashley 
and R. S. Hayes, Wabash; and William 
Winter, Omaha. 

THE SETTLERS HONEST. 

Those Wisconsin Central Forfeitetl Grant 
Settlers all Kight, 

Iron River, Wis., Jan. 14.— [Special.] 
—To a Herald correspondent, in regard 
to the alleged land grabs in Bayfield and 
Douglas counties, C. S. Rohrer, chair 
man of the Settlers organization for 
Douglas and Bayfield counties, said: 

"I should like to refute certain asper- 
sions cast on the settlers of these coun- 
ties by certain persons. The lands in 
question are still withdrawn from entry 
under the Wisconsin Central railroad 
grant. For thirteen years the unbuilt 
part of that road has lain subject to for- 
feiture, and a bill to that end is now be- 
fore congress. Hundreds of settlers are 
now on these lands, and they have main- 
tained themselves and have done their 
best to improve . their titles. 
It is true that there is good 
timber in this region, but the settlers, 
under the law, have acted in good faith 
and belive they have a perfect right to 
the land. 

"Mr. Houlton, whom Ashland parties 
traduce, was the first to see that the 
railroads had not earned these lands, 
and he and his friends settled on them. 
When these Ashland people say we have 
stolen this land by wholesale, their 
charges are false as to fact and indecent 
as to terms. No man or party or clique 
is interested in our holdings, everyone 
of which has been taken in a legitimate 
manner." 



CHARLIE GETS IT. 



Mississippi's New Governor. 
Jackson, Miss., Jan. 14.— Governor 
elect Stone was formally inaugurated 
here today. There was a large turnout 
of the state democracy and the usual 
amount of enthusiasm. 



He Is Ap|>olnted Collector of Customs at 
Dulutli Today. 

Washington, Jan. 14.— The President 
today sent the senate the following 
nominations: Treasury, Joseph Cook of 
Michigan to be supervising inspector of 
steam vessels eighth district; collector 
of customs, Charles F. Johnson, district 
of Duluth, Minn.; John N. Clark, dis- 
trict of Chicago. 

Representative Comstock is requested 
to make recommendations for the land 
office at Duluth. Tho commissioner is 
not satisfied with the present officers. 
It is possible that he has been informed 
by special agents that matters were not 
running as they should. There are such 
great interests in the Duluth district 
now, especially in the settlement of 
iron land cases that the commissioner 
wants a change. He personally rec- 
ommends Sheldon L. Frazier, of the firm 
of Osborne A Frazier, Duluth, and it is 
more than likely that he will be named 
for one of the places. Mr. Comstock 
says that the developments of the case 
and the business involved, make it nec- 
essary to make appointmei ts of a bus - 
ness nature. 

C. F. Johnson received the first notice 
of the appointment by telephone from 
The Herald office. He said briefly: "I 
was looking for it." 

HOWS THIS, MINNEAPOLIS? 

Aren't These the Fellows you Have Booked 
for Kniiirged Mills? 

Minneapolis, Jan. 11. — [Special.]— J. 
B. Bassett, principal owner of the 
Columbia flour mill, says his mill will 
shut down this week for a good while 
because there is no profit iu the flour 
business. He says other mills will do 
the same. 

PASSENGE RS H OOFED IT- 

A Motor Accident at Minneapolis Blocks 
the Line Half a Day, 

Minneapolis. Minn., Jan. 14. — An ac- 
cident on the Minnehaha branch of the 
motor line this morning, blocked the 
line up very effectually until noon. Just 
as the train reached the Glass works the 
engine jumi>ed the track and fell upon 
its side dragging the single car after it. 
The mishap was due to a defective 
flange on one of the of the drive wheels 
of the engine. 

A wrecking train was at once dis- 
patched to the scene, but it was a long 
time before the track was clear. Mean- 
while patrons of the line "hoofed it." 
No one was seriously hurt, though a 
numtjer of passengers were jolted up 
considerably. 

CALLS HARD NAMES. 

The Rig Gambler Calls His Little Ille- 
gitimate Brothers Thieves and Kobbers. 

Chicago, Jan. 14. — President Baker 
of the board of trade, in the course of 
his address preceding the bucket shop 
discussion said: 

"While the press and pulpit of Chi- 
cago are declaiming against gambling in 
secluded places where cards are used, 
the courts of this state are holding wide 
open the doors of dens of vice all over 
the land where betting is carried on 
based on the quotations which wo fur 
nish by judicial order. These resorts are 
now established in nearly every village 
in the land, and their high sounding 
names (in imitation of legitimate halls 
of commerce) with such attractive sur- 
roundings as their enormous ill-gotten 
gains enable them to maintain, is mak 
ing gambling respectable in communi- 
ties where cards are an abomination. 

"In our own and several states laws 
have been enacted to wipe out this evil, 
but they have not been enforced. The 
efforts of this association, through its 
officers, to cease to be feeder of these 
immoral institutions by owning and con- 
trolling our quotations have been unsuc- 
cessful, owing to the decisions of the 
elective judiciary, who are unable to 
distinguish any difference between busi- 
ness and gambling. We eeem, then, to 
be left to our own resources, and after 
due and careful consideration I am in 
favor of the only remedy left us, though 
it may be heroic." 

It was said by one speaker during the 
ensuing debate that New York pioduce 
exchange would furnish quotations for 
bucket shops if the Chicago 'uoard 
ceased, but that argument seemed to 
carry little weight, and a resolution en- 
couraging the directors to act as they 
saw fit was adopted. 

Maryland's Senator. 

Annapolis, Md., Jan. 14. — The senate 
and house met in joint session today and 
re-elected Ephraim K. Wilson, (dem.) 
United States senator for the term of 
six years beginning March 4, 1891. Rep 
resentative members cast their votes for 
Hon. Thos. D. Hodson of Somerset 
county. Mr. Wilson is the particular 
representative of the Eastern share in 
the upper house of congress, a peculiar 
state law requiring that one of the two 
United States senators shall be an East- 
ern shore man. 



OITY BRIEFS. 



PER80NAU 



The concert to be given at the Bethel 
Thursday evei ing promises to be an en- 
joyable event The principals have 
formed themst lives into a musical com- 
bination unde • the style of the Zenith 
City Concert club. They will repeat the 
concert at Tover early next week. 

On account }f a break in the water 
pipes the eleviitors are not running in 
the Board of Trade and Exchange build- 
ings, whereat .he elevator boys rejoice 
exceedingly. The break was repaired 
this afternoon 

Louis Lena, a former clerk with Chas. 
Schiller has opened bueiness on his 
own account in the tobacco and cigar 
business. Mr. Lena speaks for himself 
in todays Hernld. 

The followir g variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office, lotel St. Louis: 1*2 m., 
2° below; 3 ?. m.,5' above; 6 p.m., 8 
above; 10 p. n., 3' atx)ve; 7 a. m., 3° 
below; 9 a. m., 5° below; 12 m., 2 above; 
Maximum, 8' above. Minimum, 5" be- 
low. Daily range, 13 \ 

A low live-slock tariff over the North- 
ern Pacific frc m Duluth to points on 
the Oregon fe Washington Territory 
railway, went nto effect this luorniug. 

At the Chaciber of Ccjmmerce meet- 
ing this morning, Mr. Mitchell brought 
up the question of Duluth's insufficient 
and restricted street car service. The 
matter was thoroughly discussed and a 
committee apiointed to look into the 
matter. 

A frozen water main somewhere in 
the East End near the court house is 
creating oonsii lerable trouble today. The 
court house ai d jail are without water, 
also alarge number of private dwellings. 
The trouble had not been located at noon. 

Carl and Miihael Loos, brothers from 
Germany, tock out first citizenship 
papers this mc rning. 

Henry Musolf and John Dalinska, of 
Rice Lake, bondsmen of the suiciding 
treasurer, John Mylnarzek, have con- 
fessed judgme it in favor of the school 
district in the sum of 81,0(X), the amount 
of Mylnarzek'f shortage. 

A plat of "Biy View addition No. 2" 
has been filed. It embraces the greater 
part of the Ey. of NE^^ of section 11-49- 
15. The land s platted topographically, 
and most of the lots are '25x125 feet. 

There are nearly three weeks of open 
dates at the Tomple Opera in the latter 
part of January and early February. 



Ex-Alderman James Seville left yeeter- 
day for Milwaukee. 

Mr. W. S. Ford, an Ontonagan, Mich., 
man, is at The Spalding. 

Mr. Silas B. Walch of the firm of 
Oochrain & Walch is in the city. 

Mr. T. Vance and wife of Cartridge, 
Minn., are guests at the St. Louia 

Mrs. J. T. Condon left last evening 
for a winter's visit to Canada and the 
East. 

Mr. F. H. Quinby started over the 
Omaha this morning for a Pacific coast 
sojourn. 

Mr. .John Wisdom, of the Fox -Wisdom 
Lumber company of Willow river, is in 
the city. 

Col. N. A. Gearhart returned from a 
business trip to Louisville, Kentucky, 
last night. 

Mr. William Cunningham, an extensive 
wholesale woolen merchant of St. Paul, 
is in the city. 

Mr. James F. Jackson of St. Paul, a 
member of the Lakewood Land com- 
pany, is in Duluth today. 

Don G., youngest son of Col. N. A. 
Gearhart, is suffering with a severe at- 
tack of the prevalent grip. 

Mr. J. C. Morse of the Minnesota Iron 
company and Mrs. A. C. Ely, his daughter, 
are guests at The Spalding. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Stone were pas- 
sengers on this morning's Omaha, bound 
for a tour through Mexico and the 
South. 

The sister of Mrs. Judge Morris, who 
has been visiting in the city for the past 
two months, left this morning for her 
home in Lynchburg, Va. 

Mr. H. M. King of the firm of Joems 
& King was married to Miss Ella Mc- 
Clnre of Springfield, Ind., Jan. 9. The 
bride and groom returned to Duluth a 
day or two ago. 

Mr. W. C. Sargent and Engineer S. L. 
Rice left for St. Paul last night to con- 
sult with Professor Cleveland and 
George C. Stone concerning plans for 
platting topographically the remaining 
acreage in Lester Park. 

Comptroller W. G. Tenbrook went to 
Minneapolis yesterday to attend a meet- 
ing of the grand lodge F. Jc A. M. in that 
city today. He will return tomorrow. 

Miss Lucia Judd returned this noon 
to Lake City to continue her studies at 
the seminary at that place. 

Mr. T. Connelly, Jr., returned to Min- 
neapolis this afternoon from a week's 
visit in this city. 




-I- OffllAL fiUGS -1- 



Mr. E. B. Patten solicits the attendance of the 
ladies of Duluth at an 



EXHIBITION - AND - SALE 



OF 



f 



Rafe Antique & Modern ]\iM and Persian Hup & Carpets 



AT- 



28 East Superior Street, 



ON 



Wedneijdaj and Iliudaj, Jan. 15 and IB 



Each day at M A. M. and 3 P. M. 



This col ection is just cleared from the Chicago 

custom house and is 



DIRECT - FROM - 



A Flour Milling Firm. 

Jack-son, Mich., Jan. 13.— The Smith- 
Middlings Purifier companv, reorganized 
here three weeks ago, is confronted by 
claims from the Preston National bank 
of Detroit, amounting to $150,000. These 
were contracted by George T. Smith in 
July. The claim is a bill of sale of ac- 
counts of receivable and decidedly 
sweeping. The new company refused 
to pay the claim. A receiver will prob- 
ably be appointed today. The company 
gives its liabilities to the press as §484,- 
000; assets are estimated at $500,000. 
George T. Smith owes the company 
1200,000, but is unable to pay. 

Bank Klectlonii. 

Annual bank elections were held today 
as follows: National Bank of Commerce, 
the same directors were re-elected with 
the addition of C. P. Craig. Officers will 
be elected when the board organizes. 
At the First National bank the same 
officers and directors will be prooably be 
elected, the election being in progress as 
The Herald goes to press. The annual 
election of the First National Bank of 
Tower was also held today, as was that 
of the Manufacturers Bank of West Du- 
luth. 



MinerHget an Advance. 

Brussels, Jan. 14.— The terms con- 
ceded to the striking miners by mine 
owners in Charleroi district are a re- 
duction of working hours to nine per 
day and an increase of 10 per cent in 
wages. 

TlioHe Hopeful Frenchmen. 

Pakis, Jan. 14. — Le Pai.x says that the 
president of the French commission sent 
out to investigate tho affairs of the 
Panama Canal company on the Isthmus, 
in a speech made at Aspinwall, said that 
the canal would be completed. 

First Itloodslied. 

Nkw York, Jan. 14-- Capt. Grimes, 
of the steamer Uerschel, from Rio Jan- 
eiro gives news of an encounter between 
soldiers in that city. It seems that on 
Dec. 18 it was discovered that a part of 
the army, about '200 men, was opposed 
to the republic and strongly favored 
monarchy. The provisional government 
sent a company of artillery to arrest the 
insurrectionists. They opened fire on 
soldiers and over 100 of them were 
killed. 



The Fire KHcape Ordinance. 
The fire department is awaiting action 
by the council on the fire escape ordi- 
nance. There are over fifty buildings 
that come under the provisions of the 
ordinance. Those two stories and over 
must be provided with escapes. A few 
of the large hotels and other buildings 
on Superior street are now amply pro- 
vided with escapes, but many that should 
be are unsafe to occupy. 

A Itetter Line. 

Theodore Bruno has repurchased an 
interest in the steamer Bruno, that 
ferries between Rices Point and West 
Superior. With Mr. Green, his partner, 
Mr. Bruno has purchased the steamer 
Mayflower, a Detroit boat," for S3000 
cash, and will run both between Twenty- 
first avenue, Rices Point, Connors Point 
and West Superior. This new boat pos- 
sesses good speed and is larger than the 
Bruno. The two will form a first-rate 
^ ferry line. 



The colorings are fine, and everyone interested 

in these rare and interesting fabrics 

is invited to attend the sale. 



", 



Mr. Patten's instructions from the Constanti- 
nople shipper are to close every 
piece, if possible. 



ONLY 2 DAYS. 

REAL ESTATE 



Special Bargains I Snaps. 

3 Lets in Endion, $4500. 

2 Lets in Highland Park, $2500. 
20 Acres in I 0-50- 1 4 at a bargain. 
63 Letts adjoining London, cheap. 




A few of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale on ea$iy terms. 

Twent/ acres on the hill at a great bargain. 



J. M. ROOT & CO., 



Room 8, Metropolitan Block. 



J, 



1 1 X ' -M! ! 



4t 



t 



-H- 



7-1- 




l( 



\ 



DUI.XJTH EV^ENINQ HEBuAJLD: JANTTABT 14, 1890. 



EVENINa HERALD. 

ELIOT LORD, Publisher. 

PRICE, THREE CENTS— 8ub«criptlon Rates: 

D*lly, by mall, per year *l'9R 

Dally, by mall, per three months 2.00 

Dally, by mall, per one month '6 

IN THE CITY. 

Dally, by carrier, per week '8 

Entered at the postofflee at Duluth, Minn., aa 
•econd-oliuM mall matter. 

eB^The Washington otHce of The Herald Is 
at HM New York avenue. N. W. where the 
paper Is kept on tile and where The Herald 
correspoudeut will welcome visitors Irom the 
Northwest. 



Not less thao eix of The Herald's 
carrier boys are down with the grip aod 
the delivery of this paper is very irregu- 
lar. We hope they will be on duty in a 
day or two. In the meantime we are 
doing everything possible to deliver the 
paper regularly. 



the child to construct, and to direct the 
attention to these. To so bring environ- 
ment and mind together that the knowl- 
edge needed at that time shall be 
acquired, is the "art of teaching." That 
is expertly and truly put. 



Duluth will read Frank "Wilkeeon's 
tribute to Duluth push which we re- 
produce in another column, from his 
recent letter to The New York Times, 
and stick another feather in its cap. 
Come on and take the freedom of the 
city, Mr. Wilkeson. 

THE LAND OFFICE SCANDAL. 

A recent dispatch from Washington 
to The Herald announced that a chatJge 
would soon be made in the land office 
here. How well founded this report is 
we have no positive information, and do 
not even know whether the repreeenta 
tive from this district has made up his 
mind finally whom to recommend for 
appointment in the event of a change, 
But one thing we do know. There 
should be fair play for all concerned in 
this matter. The Herald is asking no 
favors for anybody and stands behind 
nobody in office or out. But for the sake 
of common justice and the public ser- 
vice it demands fair play and open 
straight-forward dealing. 

There has been a scandalous hue 
and cry from Washington and New York 
touching the management of the land 
office here. The Herald has paid no 
serious attention to this cry because of 
its manifest vagueness and lack 
of responsible authorization. It is 
only too common a practice to raise 
rub a-dubs of this kind for cheap 
political effect and to distract 
attention from really serious matters. 
No specific charges have been made in 
this case and we are not disposed to ac- 
cept whirling generalities as a substi- 
tute. Here at home little is known con- 
cerning this so-called expose at Wash- 
ington and the men against whom the 
generalities are slung, are too well and 
favorably known in this state to suffer 
from anonymous newspaper attacks. 

Register Colville served his country in 
the war for the Union with a bravery, a 
devotion and a sacrifice that no lover of 
the Union will ever forget, and whatever 
his politics may be, every public-spirited 
citizen in Duluth will demand for him 
open and just treatment at the hands of 
the national government. It is not upon 
indefinite rumors that he should 
be judged or asked to re- 
sign under a cloud which he 
has no opportunity to clear away be- 
cause of its vagueness. We do not pre- 
sume to prejudge the case, but it is not 
believed here that any specific charge of 
malfeasance in office can be substanti- 
ated against him. 

The name of A. M. Miller has been 
dragged into this scandal to give force 
to the statement that men of wealth and 
position were back of the supposititious 
"ring." A man's success in life is often 
sufficient cause for the tongue of malice 
and slander. Envy and jealousy of the 
advancement of others are apt to be 
prime motives for misrepresentation and 
falsehood. It is the trick of the thief to 
cry "slop thief I" to distract attention 
from himself. If there is anything in 
this scandal let men of flesh and blood 
stand forward and prefer distinct and 
specific charges and then let them be 
probed to the bottom. Until then The 
Herald and all lovers of fair play in 
Duluth will treat anonymous imputa- 
tions as they deserve to be treate<L 



At length the snow-clearing question 
has been brought promptly to the atten- 
tion of the council thanks to Alderman 
Liong. The general sentiment of the 
council appeared to be in favor of such 
a provision as was outlined in The Her- 
ald yesterday, constraining non-resident 
property owners to bear their share of 
the expense of keeping adjoining side- 
walks clear. Alderman Long's 
resolution was accordingly referred 
to the committee on ordinances 
with the presumable intention of in- 
corporating such a provision. At any 
rate we shall credit the council with this 
intention until we see good cause to 
think otherwise in its failure to call the 
revised resolution up for passage at its 
next session. The Herald will not for- 
get to remind the council to call it up 
without fail next Monday, and the com- 
mittee OD ordinances cannot shelve it or 
pocket it, if they would, without being 
called to account to the city. We notice 
that Alderman Thomas was possessed 
with his chronic fear that he would not 
be recognized as the sole friend of "the 
laboring man" in the council, and is agi- 
tated by the dread that laboring men 
who own their own homes will not be 
able to spare the time to clean off the 
sidewalk in front of them. We will ven- 
ture to say that "the laboring men" of 
the city will do their part to keep it 
clean and passable with less grumbling 
and more hearty good will than the men 
who will be called upon to pay unem- 
ployed hands in the city for doing the 
like work for them. If Alderman 
Thomas' peculiar notions should result 
in cutting off this source of pay this win- 
ter "laboring men" will know to whose 
friendship they owe the loss. We like 
to see a true knight of labor at work, 
but it does weary us to see a self-styled 
one tilling at a windmill of his own cre- 
ation. 



THEIR INNERMOST THOUGHTS. 



•AS IN A LOOKING GLASS." 



"As in a L'X)ktng Gla-a" was presented be- 
fore a small audience at the Temple last night 
by Lillian Lewis and a fair company. Miss 
Levis bat) Improved frreatly since last appear- 
ing In Duluth, but the weakness of p^trt of her 
support detracts aomewha; from the enjoy- 
ment of her acting. Yet her support Is as good 
as that carried by mo-t traveling stars, but for 
the heaviness of the class of j>lay8 In which 
Miss Lewis appears something other than the 
talents iwssessed by an ordinary company Is 
required. In Lena Despard Miss Lewis 
finds her favorite creation, and the 
one In which her acting Is 

at its best. The audience at the Temple last 
night was cold to a degree, and not until the 
last act did more than forced applause greet 
the company. But iu the scene at Balfour 
castle, where the erring woman but falUif ul 
wife gives proof "'f hfir devotion by suicide, a 
really line bit of acting Is given deserved recog- 
nition. But little fault can be found with W. 
A, Whitecar aa Algernon Balfour. Fanny 
Gilbert's Lady Guage. Mary Lawman as 
Felicia, and the Paul Dromlsotf of M. E. 
Heisey were noticeable. Tonight "L'Article 
47" will be given, Miss Lewis appearing as 
Cora the Creole. Tlie company most certainly 
deserves a larger house than it had last night. 



SEEN AND HcARO. 



The true discrimination of the recent 
remarks in The Public School Journal 
on the question "What is it to teach?" 
should be noted by every teacher in the 
land. If they were taken to heart, 
fewer children's heads would be treated 
as miscellaneous lumber rooms. "In the 
first place," says The Journal, "teaching 
is not the act of imparting knowledge. 
One can impart food to a child, but not 
knowledge. The conception that the 
teacher or the book is a reservoir of 
knowledge from which a portion may be 
imparted to the learner, and the reser- 
voir still remain as full as it was before, 
is common with many teacbers. How 
often have we heard knowledge de- 
scribed as that wonderful and most 
valuable possession which the possessor 
can give entirely to another and yet lose 
none of it This is a vague, poetical way 
of speaking of the process of teaching 
that has nothing helpful in 
it to him who is trying to 
discover what it is that one really does 
for another when he teaches him. 
Te :ching is the process by which the 
self-activity of the learner is excited to 
think and feel as the teacher wishes. 
This is the positive side of the act. The 
mind is a self-acting being and is con- 
scious of its self activity. Learning is 
the prooeai of forming ideas and 
thoughts that are true— that is, that 
conform to the actual truth of things as 
they exist in the world. Theae ideas 
and thoughts are ways or forms in which 
this self-active mind acts, and of which 
it is conscious. They are not something 
put into the mind, but are the mind's own 
acta and produced by it. The child 
must do its own learning. To teach is 
to stimulate the mind of the pupil to 
learn. This must be done by addressing 
the senses in one way or another, and 
thus arousing the attention (mind) to 
construct the ideas and thoughts de- 
sired. To teach is to select from the 
mass of environment that surrounds the 
learner such only as will stimulate the 
ideas and thoughts the teacher desires 



"Duluth's the place," said a gentleman on 
the morning St. Paul & Uuluth train last 
nitrht. '"l was never here before, but I am 
much interested in the city, and have made a 
thorough study of the situatl )n. The Duluth 
Jk Winnipeg Is going to be the greatest thing 
for Duluth. You'U see them begin to work 
from both ends in the spring, and there will be 
some great track-la>lag. It makes me feel 
sorry for Port Arthur, though Their n«w 
Winnipeg c-onnectlo i will never go any fur- 
tbei-. What is the use of it? This Is the bead 
of the lake. The building of the Duluth ic 
Winnipeg was a fatal blow to Port Arthur. It 
jS a complete cut-off as far as that aspiring 
town Is concerned. But It means a great. deal 
lor the head of the lakes." 

* * * 
"When I left Chicago last night," said N. A. 

Gearhart yesterday, "It was raining a little 
harder than I think I ever remember to have 
i-een it. There was a tremendous fall and this 
kept up pretty well till we reac .ed Madison, 
when it turned into snow. There wasn't a 
vestige of snow at Chicago or In the vicinity. 
Early one morning at Chicago I took a walk to 
got a little fresh air and an appetite. The air 
was so sulphurous and full of smoke, the 
freshness was a nuisance. I asked the reason 
of this state of things, thinking perhaps 
there had been a fire in the neighborhood, but 
was told that this was usual. But Chicago's 
Immense and one realizes it in taking a trip on 
the cable car for six or seven miles, passing 
block after block of solid business buildings. 
There seems to t>e no end to it." 

* * * 

It Is estimated that the railways of America 
spend each year some to,DOO,(JUO In printers Ink, 
In the way of folders, pamphlets, circulars, 
maps, etc. Some of the great linos 
issue costly souvenirs, especially If the 
road runs through a 
country, or if these be summer resorts along 
its line. Such roads as the Rome, Watertown 
& OgJensburg send out each year several 
thousand books, the contents of which are 
illustrative of scenery along the route, embel- 
lished with photographic cuts of great merit. 
The Canadian Pacific is an extensive adver- 
tiser, and it sends out each year many tons of 
mail matter to boom the great scenic route 
between the great seas. The Northern Pacific 
goes more to statistical matter, and its 
circulars are mines of information. 
It also gives away some finely 
illustrated pamphlets. The Omaha road runs 
two maps. The Union Pacific Is the great 
advertiser among railroads. Its series of maps, 
statistical matter and illustrated pamphlets, 
are gems of advertisement, and are valuable 
sources of information. Some of Its advertis- 
ing matter is fit to file away, and much will 
grace a librarj . The Wisconsin Central used 
to be the groat "snap" advertiser. Its lamp 
shades, checkerboards, diaries, etc., were 
largely sought after and gave the road much 
reputation. 

* * * 

Erick L. Winje isn't a bit Inclined to pose as 
a Demosthenes, but he got there Just the same 
last week in his summing up to the jury in a 
case wliere a money loaner had attempted to 
defraud his client, a poor man, into a second 
payment of a debt, which had already been 
obliterated at U'turious rales. "Look at him," 
said Winje, striding toward the money loaner, 
"why, gentlemen, Shakespeare's Shylock was 
a perfect and sixjtlecs angel compared to that 
man. Theoriglnal Sbakesperlan Shylock ap- 
pealed to the court for the stipulation of the 
bond, but this modern Shylock i<n't content 
with his pound of flesh but he wants my 
client's heart, and liver and lungs." The 
jury found fur bis client. 



James Cash: We run fourteen to six- 
teen men in our foundry, and Saturday 
only three of them showed up; the rest 
were laid out with influenza. 

Jay W. Anderson: This is the first 
snow I've seen since I left here, a month 
ago. In the East the weather is fright- 
ful — wet, rain, slush, mud all the time. 
I don't want any more of it in mine than 
is necessary. 

W. C. Sherwood: I'm compelled to 
attend a recent session of the district 
court; phew! I'm afraid I made a mis- 
take in opposing the removal of the 
court house. It is an infernally long 
way from the business center and I 
don't wonder that the people kick about 
it. 

A Theater-goer: Temple Opera was 
very cold last night, and I nearly froze. 
Had to take a hot lemonade after the 
play to thaw out. I grant it was a cold 
night, but an auditorium should be as 
warm as the rooms of a residence. 

E. L Fisher, Ohio Coal company: The 
city trade in coal is good, but the county 
business hasn't been up to the mark yet. 
I expect it'll be better. It looks now as 
if we would have about a third as much 
hard coal left over May 1 as last year, 
p«<rhaps 100,000 tons, and not any soft. 
Better railway business accounts for the 
consumption of bituminous. 

AMONG STATE PAPERS. 



Sauk Rapids Sentinel: We will pre- 
dict that Senator Davis will succeed him- 
self as United States senator; no matter 
who gets the fat state offices. 

Crookston Journal: We want to see 
every farmer succeed if the hopes and 
ambitions of every aspiring politician in 
the state perishes to accomplish the 
end. 

Northfield News: The 250,000 United 
States Indians have 116,G30,10G acres of 
good land to loaf and hunt upon. This 
is entirely too much for them. The av- 
erage Indian would find one acre more 
than enough if he had to cultivate it for 
his living. 

Perham Bulletin: American surplus 
capital is being used up in buying im- 
pecunious lordships and royal scape- 
graces as husbands for our addlepated 
American girls, while English capital is 
being used to buy up American flouring 
mills, breweries, salt works, tanneries, 
distilleries, etc. 

Red Wing Republican: Senator Davis 
addressed the senate in favor of his bill 
to appropriate private money for the 
CDmpletion of an enlarged lock at St. 
Marys river, and the deepening of Hay 
lake. It was crammed with figures to 
show the need of such improvement in 
that most important of all waterways. 

Barnesville Review: The members of 
the American Building and Loan asso- 
ciation at this place, after repeated 
warnings of its unstable condition, have 
become so alarmed that they sent down 
a couple of their heaviest stockholders 
to look up this corporation. They re- 
port that corporation to be in a rotten 
condit'on, though it still keeps its head 
up and goes ahead roping in suckers. 

Sauk Rapids Free Press: The Repub- 
licans are just now getting a dose of 
Waahburnism. The wealthy syndicate 
which elected him senator are seeing 
that their man attends strictly to busi- 
ness. The election of Washburn was 
remarkable in that four men knowing 
Washburn's ambition and pecuniary 
embarrassment, elected him, satisfied 
his ambition and relieved his financial 
troubles. 

Buslnetts from Dulnth. 

Sault Democrat: Today the yards of 
both Duluth, South Shore & .\tlantic 
and Canadian Pacific at the Sault are 
overcrowded, and they have been for a 
month. More freight is brought in than 
can be handled. Between the Sault 
and Duluth are 7000 loaded cars side- 
tracked, waiting for the chance to cross 
the bridge. Both roads have contracts 
for thousands of cars of corn, wheat and 
flour. Yesterday two new engines ar- 
rived from Marquette, hired by the 
Canadian Pacific to help haul west- 
bound freight. 



Relief for the Sault. 
Buffalo Express: The arguments 
which Mr. Davis, of Minnesota, put for- 
ward in the senate Thursday when ad 
vocating the improvement of St. Marys 
river and Hay Lake channel, are unan- 
swerable. The subject immediately con- 
cerns the interests, not only of Minne- 
sota, but of ail the communities, domes- 
tic and foreign, that have commercial 
relations with the regions whose pro- 
ducts find an outlet at Lake Superior, 
or a market in the territory west of that 
great inland sea. 



CROSSING THE BAR. 



[Tennyson's Latest Volume.] 
Sunset and evenlns' star, 

.\nd one clear call for me ! 
And rcav there be no moaning of the bar. 

When I put out to sea. 

But such a time as moving seems asleep. 

Too full for sound and foam. 
When that which drew from out the boundless 
deep 

Turns again homo. 

Twilight and evening bell. 

And after that th*- dark! 
And may there he no sadness of farewell 

When I embark ; 

For tho' from out our bourne of Time and 
Place 

The Hood may bear me far, 
I hope to see my Pilot face to face 

when I have crost tlie bar. 



A Good Record Indeed— For the Flgnrer. 

Duluth Daily News: During the time 

that the Imperial mill was running, from 

r.\ ;»,.~.a-..,^ ^^- ^ ^ '^*°- 1' the output was 84,447 

.^,Vl »^!!^ ■ barrels of flour— a very good record for 

so young a plant. This is an average of 

4444 barrels for each working day. 

Fearing a Touch of "the Grip." 

Imported tonsorial artist — They say, 
sir, that hintiuenza's hin the hair, air. 

Nervous customer^Then pray be very 
careful what brushes you use. 

Cockney barber— Hi don't mean the 
air hof the 'ed, sir; hi mean the hair hof 
the hatmosphere. 



$583.33 

Will handle one of Thomas & Hendrick's 
5 acre lota on the hill. A rare bargain. 
L. J. Taussig, 

Phcenix block. 



Oneota. 

We have a large and choice list of 
Oneota property which is a bargain if 



taken at once. 

Mknijenhall & 



H00PE.S. 



.Silence Herure, Silence .4fter. 

Miss Robust — What did you remark 
Mr. Pendegast? 

Mr. Pendegast — Aw, I didn't say any- 
thing. 

Miss Robust— Well, suppose you do. 

Mr. Pendegast— What shall I say. 

Miss Robust — Say, for example, good- 
night. 



IJoes Kzperieuce Count? 

It does, in every line of business, and 
especially in compounding and preparing 
medicines. This is illustrated in the 
great superiority of Hood's Sarsaparilla 
over other preparations, as shown by the 
remarkable cures it has accomplished. 

The head of the firm of C. I. Hood & 
Co. IS a thoroughly competent and ex- 
perienced pharmacist, having devoted 
his whole life to the study and actual 
preparation of medicines. He is also a 
member of the Massachusetts and Am 
erican Pharmaceutical associations, and 
continues actively devoted to supervis- 
ing the preparation of and managing 
the business connected with Hood's 
Sarsaparilla. 

Hence the superiority and peculiar 
merit of Hood's Sarsaparilla is built 
upon the most substantial foundation. 
In its preparation there is represented 
all the knowledge which modern research 
in medical science has developed, com- 
bined with long experience, brain-work 
and experiment. It is only necessary to 
give this medicine a fair trial to realize 
its great curative value. 



PROMINENT PEOPLE. 



has re- 



Ex-Consul-Greneral Waller 
turned to London. 

Ex-United States Senator Lapham of 
New Hork is dead. 

Ex- President Cleveland and bis wife 
will soon go to Florida for a few weeks. 

Amasa D. Ward, a well-known New 
York broker, died yesterday from the ef- 
fects of the grip. 

Historian Bancroft is remarkably well 
this winter. He ascribes his good health 
to the warm weather. 

Vice-President and Mrs. Morton gave 
a dinner last evening in honor of Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Harrison. 

It is said that the Czar has ordered 
that the brutal officials in Siberia who 
were responsible for the recent massacre 
be severely punished. 

Senator Blair yesterday introduced a 
bill to appropriate (|50,000 for the erec- 
tion of a statue to Maj.-Gen. John H. 
Stark in Manchester, N. H. 

The Peters pence for 1889 yielded to 
the pope $.'iO,000 less than in 1888. Th« 
legacies bequeathed to the pope during 
the year amount to ^800,000. 

Secretary Rusk was asked recently to 
take a hand at poker. He refused on 
the ground that the crops fully satisfied 
his interest in the fluctuations of chance. 

It is stated that Empress Augusta 
left 7,000,000 marks. Her jewels and or- 
naments are bequeathed to n^rsonal 
friends as keepEakes. One very valuable 
jewel is left to the Empress Victoria. 

It IS expected that a brilliant musical 
•tar has been discovered in a teacher in 
Konigsberg named Holldank. He is a 
wonderful tenor, and has already been 
engaged by the director of the opera at 
Berlin for six years. 

The notorious Marquis of Ailesbury, 
commonly regarded as the most dis- 
graceful member of the British aristoc- 
racy, has been forced under the encum- 
bered estates act to sell Savernake, a 
tnagnificent property sixteen miles in 
circumference, and comprising 4000 acres 
of forest. 

Rear-.\dmiral William Radford died 
last evening at his home in Washington. 
He was a native of Virginia, but entered 
the naval service from Missouri in 18'25. 
He was placed on the retired list in 1870. 
At the time of his death he was, with 
the exception of Rear Admiral Selfridge, 
the senior rear-admiral of the navy. 

BITS OF STATE NEWS. 



The Indians on the Mille Lacs reser- 
vation are suffering greatly from hunger, 
owing to tho scarcity of game and fish. 

Secretary Windom has appointed Pro- 
fessor W. W. Folwell of the state univer- 
sity, a member of the assay commis- 
sion. 

A snow storm with a blizzard attach- 
ment, struck Beardsley yesterday. 
Drifts have piled up in some places as 
high as twenty feet. A piercing north 
wind accompanied the storm. Traffic 
is at a standstill. 

Fire was discovered in the Peoples 
elevator Saturday night at New York 
York Mills, and the flames gained such 
headway that the department could do 
nothing. The elevator contained 20,000 
bushels of wheat. Loss, $25,000; insur- 
ance, 610,000. 

A young man named Henry Johns was 
badly hurt at St. Paul yesterday. He 
boarded a street car and began swaying 
it. The driver started baok for 
the youths and all jumped off, Johns 
landing in front of a car coming ia the 
opposite direction. He is at present in 
a critical condition. 



They Had Both Kinds. 

Old lady (to clerk in general store) — 
Young man, I want some powder. Clerk 
— Yes'm, boy or girl." 

He wooed her and sued hor and sought her. 

Till ho melted her heart so cold. 
Then he married the ice man's daughter 

And now he is rolling in gold. 

The Only Explanation. 

Chicago Man — You don't mean to say 
you make money in St. Louis, do you? 

St. Louis man (testily)— I've made half 
a million there, sir. 

Chicago man (amazed)— Well I well! 
Are you the sheriff? 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

Poor Humanity! 

The common lot is one of sorrow say 
— at least — the pessimists, thev who 
look at the worst side. Certainly what 
would otherwise be a bright existence, 
is often overshadowed by some ailment 
that hangs it like a pall, obscuring 
perpetually the radiance that else would 
light the path. Such an ailment, and a 
very common one, is nervousness, or in 
other words, weakness of the nervous 
system, a condition only irremediable 
where inefficient or improper means are 
taken to relieve it. The concurrent ex- 
perience of nervous people who have 
persistently used Hostetters Stomach 
Bitters is, that it conquers entirely su- 
persensitiveness of the nerves, as well as 
diseases— so called— which are invited 
and sustained by their chronic weak 
ness. .\s the nerves gain stamina from 
the great tonic the trouble disappears 
Use the bitters for malaria, rheumatism, 
billiousness and kidney troubles. 

Grand Skating Tournament. 

A grand skating tournament will take 
place Saturday evening, Jan. 18, at the 
West End Parlor Skating rink. Twenty- 
first avenue west and Superior street, 
between ^welve young ladiea A fine 
gold medal will be awarded to the win- 
ner. Four competent judges will be on 
hand to award the prize. Walkers Mili- 
tary band will be on hand. Everybody 
should try and attend as it will be the 
finest match ever seen in Duluth. Ad- 
mission, gents, 25c; ladies, 15c; children, 
10c. The match will take place at 9 
o'clock sharp. Medal can be seen at 
rink. T. M. Ericson, Prop. 

Capt. S. G. Johnson, Manager. 

Any kind or description of ledger, 
jf>urnal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms. 



6 PER CENTI 



We have at command unlimited 
amounts of money to lend promptly 
at 6 per cent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



Loans Made on Onimproved Property. 



BUILDING LOANS A SPECIALTY, 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTGAGES 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT. 



SCROFULA 

Is that Inparlty of the blood which produces 
nnslgbtly lumps or BweUlngs In the neck] 
which causes running sores on the armt, 
lesB, or feet; which develops ulcers In th« 
eyes, oars, or nose, often causing blindness or 
deafness; which Is the origin of pimples, can- 
cerous growths, or "humors;" which, fasten- 
ing upon the lungs, causes consumption and 
death. It is the most ancient of all diseases, 
and very few persons are entirely free from It. 

How Can 
It Be 



CURED 



By taking Hood's Sarsaparilla, which, by 
Qie remarkable cures It has accomplished, 
has proven Itself to be a potent and peculiar 
medicine for this disease. If you sufler from 
scrofula, try Iluod's Sarsaparilla. 

" Every spring my wife and children have 
been troubled with scrofula, my little boy, 
three years old, being a terrible sufferer. 
Last spring be was one mass of sores from 
her d to feet. Wo all took Hood's Sarsaparilla, 
and all have been cured of the scrofula. My 
little boy is entirely free from sores, and all 
four of my children look bright and healthy." 
■W. B. Athebton, Passaic City, N. J. 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

Boldbyalldrnggistii. tfl ; six toi $r>. Preparedonl; 
by C. I. hood a CO., Apothecaries, LoweU, Mass. 

100 Doses One Dollar 



REAL ESTATE. 



SPECIAL LIST 



-of- 



BARGAINS 



offered by 



C. E. RICHARDSON. 



Acreage on the hill, Just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three iines of street railway. 
Undivided half interest in this forty 
acres can be had for $52,00O 

80 Acres at West End, near Brook, 
dale Division 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior 1 60 

1 Acres in the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 

The best bargain offered now Is stock In the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Duluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 

C. E. RICHARDSON, 

325 West Superior Street. 

coFFiii i mmi 

ao FARGDSSON BUKIK. 



80 Acres, sectiofi 9-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 33-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-50- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15. 

All below the market. 
COFFIN & WARNER. 



W. C. SHERWOOD & CO., 

REAL ESTATE, 

LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

BAVB GENUINE BAKaARlS IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

In difft. , parts of the city and 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 

All we ask Is fori., rtlestoexamineourllst and 

compare them rith other prices before 

buying. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood &. Co., 



J. D. & R. C. RAY, 

REAL ESTATE. 

ROOM "B," - HUNTER BLOCK. 



B. C. OHIDLBY. J. C. MISHLRK 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 
Real Estate Brokers 

Kuom 26, Bzohat\g« Building. 
List your property with usat 'That It Is worth 
and we will sell It. We lnvlt€ everybody to 
call In and se*; us, and solicit 0'>rre8pondence 



IWIONEY TO LOAN IN ALL 
'"' sums on Duluth Real 
Estate at 6 1-2, 7 and 8 per 
cent. No delay. 

JULIUS D. HOV'ARD, 
Room 3, - - Mil'«r Block. 




6REAT ENGLISH REMEDY! 

Murray's Specific. 

•' »»*.7oT?»At ^ g-uarantet cure for all ner 
vouB disease such as Weak 
Memory, Loss Brain Power, 

Hysteria, Headache, Pain In the 
Hack, Nervous Prostration, 
Ijfucorrhoea, Universal Lassi- 
tude, Seminal Weakness, Impo- 
lency and general loss of power 
of the Generative Organs;— Id 
- either sex, caused by Indiscre- 
fItllltTlkuiCi tton or over-exertloD, and which 
uitlmateu lead to Premature Tra4* 
Old Age. Insanity audCon8umi>- 
tlon. 11.00 or a box or six boxes 
for 16.00. Sent by mall on re- 
ceipt of.'urlce. Pull partlcalars 
In pamphlet, sent free to every 
applicant. W« Oaarantee Six 
Boxes to cure any case. For 
every 15.00 order received, we 
send six boxes, with a written . 
guarantee to refund the moneyi«»_-T^jji»— 
If our Specific does not effect a curiv Addrest 
sU (!ommunlcatlon6 to the sole manufacturers 
THR MUKHAY MEDICINKCO. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
«o«<l fr. II ninth br Mi»» Wlrth 





$8.00- 



Best Set 
"of Teeth. 



CULLUM 



Painleis Dentist. 

Koom 1-1, 40H West Superior Street, 
Psrgusson RImik. milutfc 



DAVID M. FORD, 

Houghton, L. S., Mich. 

DEALER IN 

Lake Superior Gold, Iron and Copper Ms 

Michigan Gold Company's Stocica Specialty. 

"The richest mines In tho world." 

CORRESPONDEMCE SOLICITED. 



WHITE BEAVER'S 



CUIiUE&PRIUDLE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 808 I HEALS DISEASED LUNGS. DRUGGISTS SELL n 

Duluth National Bank Building. | T. H. SPEHCE, LA CROSSE, WIS. \ 



wn jw yEAR. 

The Season of Grand 
Resolves and Sol- 
emn Vows. 



All of Which is Well in Its 

Way, but Practice is 

the Thing. 



You Can All "Get There" if 

You Try, so You hai 

Better Try 



THE NEW YEAR'S LEAF. 



rChicago Herald.J 
Just now Is the time when the average man 
llegins to prospectively mentally plan, 
.•\k the annual swearing off season draws near. 
< )f the leaf he'll turn over the tlret of the year. 
Everything that Is wrong from his life he'll 

efface. 
And naught that's unjust In bis thoughts have 

a place. 
He's sure he has power all evil to shun 
When he says so and so then tho business Is 

done. 
But, in order tt) have his new plan broken In, 
He'd bettor not tarry a day to begin. 
And 'tis best he should not use the leaves too 

fast. 
Why not employ this year the leaf turned for 

last? 

Here we are the first of a new 
year as bright and happy as 
children with new toys. You 
have just closed up the record 
of the year 1889, and we sin- 
cerely hope the balance is in 
your favor— "by a large major- 
ity," If your expectations 
were not fully realized, we are 
very sorry indeed, and trust 
you will not think us too famil- 
iar if we commiserate with you. 
Well, never mind, don't feel 
badly because you failed to 
make the most of your oppor- 
tunities, for it can't be helped 
now. Recollect that there is 
no teacher in the world whose 
lessons are so impressive as 
Old Mother Experience. It is 
an easy thing to look back and 
see where you massed it, and 
then, too, in looking back at 
these bad breaks it seems so 
strange that you didn't know 
better. "Why," you say to 
yourself, "anyone who is half 
witted ought to have known 
better." That is true, but 
again we suggest that it does 
no good to harrow up your feel- 
ings in that way. The new 
year is spread out before you 
like a new blank book, all un- 
written. As the days go by 
the pages will be filled, one by 
one, and when the year is end- 
ed the volume will be closed 
and put away in your archives, 
and you will commence again. 
Since you commenced making 
up the book just closed, we put 
one of the finest pieces of 
suburban property on the mar- 
ket anywhere about Duluth; 
and simply because we offered 
lots at extremely low prices 
and on the people's easy pay- 
ment plan, a good many inno- 
cent and honest persons sup- 
posed that it was all a humbug 
and a cheat. We can't much 
blame them for jumping at the 
conclusion that it was outside 
farm land, instead of fine resi- 
dence property, because our 
prices were so low and our 
terms so favorable. But that 
is where many of you made a 
BAD mistake. Had you inves- 
tigated, you would have invest- 
ed, and so made money. But 
you can make amends for that 
this year. Now, in strict confi- 
dence (which we beg of you 
not to repeat), we will tell you 
something: Water works, sew- 
ers and electric lights will be 
put in at Lakeside, Lester Park 
and Crosley Park, a system of 
parks and boulevards laid out, 
hundreds of fine new houses 
and comfortable homes built, 
suburban train service greatly 
improved— although it is ex 
cellent now— and the whole 
face of affairs changed. Lots 
that now sell for $125 each 
will then bring $260; lots that 
now sell for $200 will readily 
sell at $400, and so on. it is 
hard to understand how people 
who feel assured that all this 
great growth is so near at hand 
should wait. The wayto make 
money is to get ahead of the 
crowd and buy before the ma- 
jority of people do, and before 
the developments occur. Now, 
if you want to start out the new 
year right and make a record 
with which you will be satis- 
fied, take our advice and buy 
lots in Crosley Park, and buy 
NOW. If you wan't to make 
your money go as far as possi- 
ble, and thus make the utmost 
with it, buy what you can reach 
on the easy payment plan and 
keep up your weekly instal- 
ments, and you will be c^elight- 
ed with the results. Remem- 
ber, you will have no interest 
to pay, and that makes quite 
a difference. 

Hoping that you will do your- 
self a kindness by following 
our advice, and wishing you all 
a most happy and prosperous 
new year"-and many succeed- 
ing ones— we beg leave to sub- 
scribe ourselves 

Your real(ty) friends, 

C. E. LOe 4 CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. 



i 1 


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O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Rooms 510, \\\ and \\l Dylutb Onion National Bank Building. 




R. KROJANKER, 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 

Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing 
kinds of furs a specialty. *®»Good workm 
ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 



209 East Superior Street. 



Duluth, Minn. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 



DR. GEO. B. HATCOCK. 



Manager 



3 Perfornnances Only 



— OOMMBNCINO— 



MONDAY, JAN. 13 



THE GREAT 



JLLIA! LEWIS 

In the following repertoire: 

loQdayET'g, - As in a Looking Glass. 
Taesday EyenlDg, - - L'irtlcle 47. 
Wednesday Evening, • Nef Magdalen. 



Sjpportedby W. A. WHITECAR and her own 
c >mpany, with all th* original scenery, show- 
ii g the famous Monte Carlo by moonlight. 
New and gorgeous costumes. 



CiRAND SCENIC EFFECTS. 



PEOPLES THEATER. 



DULUTH. 



JOHN 8. BARNES. Mgr. 



This week, commencing JAN. 
Tlie Great Attraction, 



13. 



PRISON LIFE 

—AND— 

Ihe Best \m\] Show in the Horthwest 



ADMISSION: 



TEN CENTS ! TEN CENTS ! 



THREE 



ICREAGE 



Bargains 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 16 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



Room lo. 



HUGO & CO., 

I iT s -cr la .6. IT c E . 
- .Metropolitak Block. 

TELEPHONE 2*2. 



OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned. 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER.loe Second St. East. 



WANTS. FOB SALE. ETC 



ONE CENT A AORD IN ADVANCE. 



Advertibt'iuents under this head received at 
the lollowiug plaws, besides the business of- 
fice ol liie Herald: 

Kudion Pharmacy, 127 Tenth avenue east. 

Iloyce & Totman, corner Fourth avenue 
and Superior street west. 

J. W. NeiMtn, No. IHOl, corner Eighteenth 
avenue west and Superior street. 

D. Johnson, chief clerk Phillips hotel. West 
Duluth. 



Help Wanted. 

WANTED-A cook for a small family, 
quire, XJO East Second street. 



In 



WANTED— A first-class German nurse girl. 
Address Koom aiC, First National bank. 



I WISH to employ u few ladies on salarv to 
take charge of my business at their homes. 
Light, very fasiinaliug aud healthlul Wages 
»1U i>er week. Ketcrenoe given. Good pay for 
part time. Address with Btamp, Mrs. Marlon 
W alker, Louisville, K.y. 

ANTED at once, a good housekeeper, 
Skaodinavian. Call at 110 St. Croix ave- 



w 



XIT'ANTBD— Box maker at Duluth Trunk 
T» factory. Apply 215 West Superior 



ANTED— A girl for general bouse work 
Ninth avenue east, 



yV fdmily of three. Call in forenoon, 411 



«2£»/\ S ALA BY, »40 ei|»en8es in advance, 
i^\J\J allowed each month. Stead>' em- 
ployment at home or traveling. No soliciting. 
Duties delivering and making coUecllons. No 
postal Oiirds. Address with stamp, Uufer & 
Co., Piqua, Uhio. 



WANTED— Pastry cook, also other help, 
inquire Phillips hotel. 

WANTED— At the Womans Employment 
Bureau, ill t^uperior street east, tw- ' 



tor Kent. 

lOR RENT— Desirable room: 
steam, etc.; private familj'. 
Herald office. 



Y' 



W 



ANTED— A furnished house for the win 
ter. L. .1. Taussig, No. 9 Phoenix block 



If taken at once. 



D' 



Land situated near 





— THE- 



Greatest Snaps 



F YOU WISH TO SELL OK BUY DULL'TH 

J. or SuiHjrior bank stock, curporatiuu or In- 
vestmeut securities, call on or liddress B. Mur- 
ptiiu, btxtker, M Bauuiog block, Duluth, Minn. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



X. 



H. WILSON; ATTORNEY AND C»UN- 

. _ sellor at Law. Will practice in State 

and United States Courts. Ail business given 
prompt attention, 44 Fargusson Block. Duluth, 
Miuu. 

T3LASTERING. 

H, T. DmHAM. 

All kinds of plastering done. Jobbing 
promptly attended to. OOice, room D, Hun- 
ter block. 




/ 




/ 



second girls and a dozen girls tor general 
house work. Employment obtained free Of 
cost. Mrs. A. D. Ayers. 

For .Sale. 

FOR SALE— A heavy working team cheap 
at A. W. Eiler's S04 Lake avenue south. 

TT^OR SALE 

purchaser. 



My residence with oO or lUU feet 
tst Sooond street. Terms to suit 
E. A. Gilbert, XI Board of Trade. 



HEAVY HORSES tXJK SALE— 16 head of 
heavy horses, raised at Lake Park, on 
t'le Northern Pacific road, tor sale by C. W. 
Harv'ey. Can be seen at Howard baru, on the 
lake shore, Minnesota point. Residence. 'i!3 
West Fourth street. 



Lost. 

LOST— Part of a gold-link cuff button in 
shape of three rings. Lost in Sui>erior 
or Dululli. Finder will receive reward by 
leaving the same at my office. Robert G . Mc- 
Dowell, Sf7 West Suptrior street. 



I! W 

1 



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f 



LOST— The rocord and account book of the 
Friends in Council society. Contains 
about lOU pages and is eight or nine inches 
square. A liberal reward will be paid for it's 
return to Aiworth's abstract office, SJ7 Wc*t 
Superior street. 




bath, gas. 
Address S., 



i^ 



Financial. 

ULUTH MORTGAGE LOAN C»MPANY( 
loans money in any amount on f urniV 
lure, pianos, horses and wagons without re* 
moval from owner's possession ; also on war<y- 
house receipts, bank stocks, and any pro^ierty 
of value: notes diSLX>uute.i; partial paymen^..^ 
received and your own lime granted lor pay- 
s;>ent; no delay; money on hand and furnished 
immediately alter securitj- is approved. Wm. 
Horkau, Manager, Room H, Fargusson block, 
Duluth, Minn. 



/ 




M 



KS. J. 8. DINWOODIE, 



Teacher of Piano Forte, Voice and Sight Sinfl^ 
ing. Chorus and Choir Conductor. 

Music rooms at J. J. Wlggins's, 16 Bast Su 
perior street, and at residence. 121 Tenth ave. K 



M 



B. H. PAKKBK ROBINSON. 
VOCAL INSTRrCTlON, 
8 MILES BLOCK. 



In the market. 



ADDRESS 



•? 



BOX A A, DULUTH, MINN. 



CMILLEN at STKBBINS, 

per 

— , Exchange bulidiug 



MCMILLEN at STKBBINS, ARCrirTKCTS , 
and superliitendents. Office, room No., 



/ 



PAJLMER & 
r 



"ajJd 



HALL, ARCUITBCTS 

8uperlnt«udents.room 4e, Exchange build- 
ing. Dululh. Minn. K. S. Palmer. L. P. Hall. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. 



FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can t>e found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table is supplied, and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



/ 



Great French remedy. Da, LeDcc'8 per. 
lODiCAL ciij.,*, from Paris, France, act only on 
the generative organs in females and posi- 
tively cures suppression of menses (from what- 
ever cause), and all periodical troubles pectl- 
liar to women. A safe, reliable remedy, war- 
ranted to excite menstruation or money re- 
funded. Should not be used during pregnancy. 
The large proportion of the ills to whicn ladies 
are subject Is the direct result of a disordered 
and irregular menstruation. Bobt. Stevenson 
ftCo., Chicago, III., H. Boswarth & Co., Mll- 
waultee. Wholesale Agts. The genuloe only 
aupplled by Boyoe & xotmAn, Sole A«U., Du- 




mm 



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DUIiUTH EVENTNG TTPIRAIJI JANTJABY 14 1890. 



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A RIDE BEtlINO ii PLOW. 



A Successful invention Tried 

on Two of Duluth's 

Railways. 



The Snow Flanger of 
Mechanic Priest of 
Eastern. 



Master 
the 



Some Descriptions of the De- 
vice and Its Workings 
in Use. 



There are various kinds of snow plows 
in use on the clitTerent railroads in the 
country — rotaries, scrapers, Gangers, 
track-cleaners and any number of de- 
vioea, all of which are more or less prac- 
ticable. Until recently, however, no ap- 
pliance has been contrived to clear out 
the intervening; suow and ice between 
tracks, and the only effectual way has 
been by hand-shoveling. 

A new device in the form of a snow 
flanger, inventetl by A. F. Priest, an em- 
ploye in the mechanical department of 
the Eastern Minnesota railway, has 
solved the problem and bids fair to mark 
an important era in railroading. Yes- 
terday afternoon it was attached to 
the engine on the south-bound 
Eastern train for a practical test. R. O. 
t«azier and a Herald reporter climbed 
into the cab to inspect the working of 
the danger. Before starting out a casual 
glance over the contrivance developed 
the fact that it was an extremely simple 
piece of mechanism, differing very little 
in appearance from an ordinary small 
Bnow plow. It is not necessarj- to give 
any technical description of the danger, 
or the manner in which it is attached to 
the pilot. By an ingenious mechanical 
arrangement it is so suspended that it 
cannot touch the rail. At the same 
time the danger travels the same rela- 
tive distance below the top of the rail 
at all times when working, and 
is entirely independent of. any vertical 
or lateral motion of the engine. It is so 
nicely adjusted that it will not remove 
torpedoes placed on the track, bat leaves 
them in position to do their duty. 

About seven miles out the tirst snow 
of any consequence was encountered. 
Its depth was eight or t«in inches above 
the top of the rails and hard packed. It 
is here where the danger gets in its 
fine work. It shoveled out the snow, 
not only between the rails, but also 
8coop)ed out about eighteen inches on 
either side, this being done while travel- 
ing at the rate of thirty-five or forty 
miles an hour. The intervening snow 
was cleaned out to a sufficient depth to 
prevent any portion of the train or en- 
gine from dragging in it. A great ad- 
Tantage is that the flanger can be raised 
by the engineer to bring it to the height 
of the guards when passing over cross- 
ings or other obstructions. Another 
noteworthy feature is that on the out- 
side of the rail any desired width or depth 
of cut can be taken. * This is 
a decided advantage for engines with 
bad tires. The peculiar shear of the 
flanges throws the snow far out of the 
way. Robert Baird, the engineer in 
charge, handled the contrivance in a 
manner which showed a pierfect famil- 
iarity with its workings. He is an en- 
thusiastic admirer of its many e.xcellent 
points. For ease of handling, and ad- 
mirable work, he said it was far ahead of 
anything of the kind. 

At a stopping place the track in the 
rear was examined. The enow was 
thoroughly cleaned out between the 
rails, being scraped up to a slight ridge 
in the center of the track. Nest to the 
rails the snow was removed and was so 
scraped away as to preclude all possi- 
bility of its failing back on the rail, 
which is frequent, and makes hauling 
difficult. The inventor claims that his 
plow leaves the track in such a condition 
that it is possible to add from three to 
six more cars than is handled under 
the usual condition of track. The 
flanger was in use last winter on the 
road, but owing to the fact that there 
was but little snow to contend with, its 
usefulness was not so apparent as now, 
and its work has never been described 
except in one or two technical jour- 
nals. 

The Northern Pacific has just put 
several of the machines on its line. 
Prominent officials of both roads approve 
of the contrivance and speak highly of 
its value and utility. Snow in a wet or 
packed condition and solid ice is re- 
D'oved with apparently little effort. Its 
cheapness is another important consider- 
ation. It costing only §90 attached ready 
for business. Most appliances of this 
nature cost from five to six times as 
much. Another very important item is 
the utter impossibility of derailment or 
other accidents by reason of breakage. 
Even if not raised when passing over 
any obstruction, the worst than can 
happen is the breaking of one or more of 
the knives. These cost but forty cents 
each, and a whole set can be replaced by 
the engineer in ten minutes. 

The run was made to Hinkley in a 
few minutes over schedule time, not- 
withstanding the heaviness of the track 
on account of the snow. 



PROBLEM OF GO VERNMENT. 

Hon. S«th Low Coutinaes UIm Discoante 
on the iiuUiect, 
[The Herald publL-hes below a sixth 
installment of the address of Hon. Seth 
Low of Brooklyn, to the students of 
Johns Hopkins university. In view of 
the interest awakened in Duluth over 
municipal government and the future of 
this city, the matter will be of interest. 
It will be continued from day to day 
till completed.] 

The next element in efficient adminis- 
tration on the part of a city government 
is that it should work together. The 
police department, for example, touches 
in its daily duties the department of city 
works, the health department, the fire 
department, and the building depart- 
ment. The city ordinances affecting all 
these departments depend for their en- 
forcement upon the efficiency and co- 
operation of the police. It has not been 
uncommon in .\merican cities for public 
controversies between these different de- 
partments to be carried on in the news- 
papers, a situation manifestly incon- 
sistent with that measure of efficiency 
which springs from the harmonious 
working together of a city government. 
This failure to co-operate with one 
another, so frequently found in the ex- 
ecutive heads of department in our 
cities, springs in the main from the 
absence of any tie compelling them to 
realize a common responsibility. They 
are, indeed, oflicers of the same city, but 
that is all. Frequently they are elected 
by the people, and each one feels himself 
independent of all other authorities for 
that reason. His department is his 
business, and nobody else's. Or, if they 
are appointed by the mayor and con- 
firmed by the common council, such ap- 
pointments usually involve the feeling 
that they represent this or that political 
or personal interest. One faction may 
be placated by having the police depart- 
ment, another by being given tne board 
of health. 

The idea of a common responsibility 
to work together for the public interest 
never presents itself under such con- 
ditions. It happens, therefore, that city 
governments are often at loose ends, 
very much as the planets would be if the 
law of gravitation were suspended. Col- 
lisions in the heavens would not be more 
certain in the presence of such a sus- 
pension of the law of gravity, than con- 
flicts between departments and bureaus 
are certain in a city government which 
is held to no common responsibility. 
This element of responsibility to a com- 
mon head can only be effectively ob- 
tained through the appointment of all 
such officials by the mayor of the city. 
This relation gives to a city government 
precisely the element which is needed— 
a responsibility to a common head who 
is himself responsible to the people of 
the city. A" government so ordered, as 
compared with a government in which 
the heads of departments feel each one 
independent of all the others, would pre- 
sent precisely such a result as that which 
so frequently is seen on the baseball field, 
where a nine which is in the habit of 
playing together defeats a nine made up 
of better individual players who have 
not been in the habit of playing to- 
gether. 

The honesty of a city government de- 
pends upon the character of the men of 
which it is composed. These men must 
be not simply honest in the negative 
sense that they will not be dishonest, 
but they must be aggressively honest in 
the sense that they will not wink at dis- 
honesty in others. They must be 
men of strong parts, capable of resisting 
immense pressure from outside. 
"Wheresoever the carcass is, there the 
eagles will be gathered together," and 
so long as our cities are making immense 
disbursements, not only for current 
work but for permanent improvements, 
there it is certain the city officials will 
be surrounded by men who seek t« 
profit dishonestly at the expense of the 
city. Experience and common prudence 
demonstrate the importance of publicity 
and clearly-defined method as to all 
official acts involving the use or appro- 
priation of money, but back of all such 
safeguards must lie the sense of personal 
responsibility on the part of the official. 

Happily the same system wnich leads 
to the greatest efficiency and the greatest 
measure of popular control gives also 
the greatest security in the direction of 
honesty. When responsibility is per- 
sonal and cannot be shared with or put 
off upon others, an official is compelled 
to watch his steps with far moie care 
than when all action depends upon the 
result of so many officials that no single 
one is responsible. Again, when re- 
sponsibility is personal, the praise for 
well-doing is personal, as well as the fear 
of punishment. Sometimes it would 
seem as if too little account were made 
of the better side of human nature in our 
attitude toward city officials. The in- 
spiration to the beist work surely is 
found, on the part of officials as well as 
on the part of private citizens, in the 
recognition by others of work that de- 
serves recognition. Such recognition it 
is impossible to expect when responsi- 
bility and power are both divided and 
shared. 

[To be contlnued.l 



WEST END. 




A Beautiful Plat. 

Messrs Macfarlane & Austin of West 
Dul'-.th, and Harris Brothers of Duluth, 
ir't put on the market this week one of 

^e most l)eautiful platted and desirable 
piecee of property yet offered for aale in 
West Duluth. Oneota Park, as the new 
addition is called, is topographically 
platted and the lots are over 30 per cent, 
larger than those of other plats. The 
remarkably low prices and good terms 
offered insure this property a very ready 
sale. 

To I.and!i ot Sun. 

When old Boreas breathes on the 
lakes and rivers of the North, binding 
them in fetters of ice, there is a great 
deal of out-door sport to be enjoyed by 
those who are endowed with rugged 
constitutions. But there are many who 
dread the approach of winter, and 
would migrate to "lands of sun" if they 
could be sure of a comfortable journey 
and knew where to go. Among the 
lands that are sunny in winter are the 
Southern coast of the United States and 
California, the golden. There are 
numerous winter resorts in both sec- 
tions, but for those who have time for a 
longer ride nothing can equal a trip to 
Old Mexico. There one is in a country 
where people, climate, customs and pro- 
ductions are all wondrously different 
from anything in Uncle Sam's domain. 
"The Burlington" has two lines of its 
own southward — to Chicago and to St. 
Louis. For full information as to rates 
and routes write to W. J. C. Kenyon, 
Gen. Pass. Agent, C, B. & N. R. R., St. 
Paul, Minn. 



leiBUTE TO DULUTH PUSH 



Deserved Enconnium on the 
Enterprise of Du- 
luth Men. 



Four Steel Steamships 
Row; The Value of a 
Ship Yard. 



in 



The enterprising push of Duluth men 
is famous, as well as it should be. In a 
recent letter to The New York Times 
from Tacoma, the correspondent, Frank 
Wilkeson, pays them a deserved tribute 
as follows: 

"I have recently been at Duluth, and 
only the other day I was at Seattle. If 
the Duluth men, or men possessing the 
same qualities had settled at Tacoma, 
the supremacy of the Puget Sound 
towns would have been determined long 
ago. In 1873 Duluth was dead, and ap- 
parently was waiting for the arrival of 
an enterprising undertaker to cheaply 
bury the town. The Northern Pacific 
Railroad company couldn't stimulate 
Duluth into activity. Today Duluth, 
with a far lower valuation per front foot 
of business property than Tacoma, has 
twenty times the enterprise. Duluth's 
streets are paved, her sewers are laid, 
street cars are running, electric lights 
blaze throughout the city, cable roads 
are being laid, and, when her harbor is 
clear of ice, she does more 
business in a week than Tacoma 
does in a month. 

But these Duluth men seized 
every opportunity to develop 

their town andthe region which 
IS tributary to it. If an iron ore vein 
was discovered, they thrust their hands 
deeply into their pockets and developed 
the mine and began to ship ore. If they 
needed more ships and better ships, they 
boldly incurred indebtedness and built 
them. Time came when their hotel ac- 
commodation was not sufficient. They 
bnilt and furnished The Spalding house 
at a cost of $500,000. They needed steel 
and iron works; they built them. If 
these men were at Tacoma and were 
hemmed in by forests and by hills that 
are ribbed with coal and iron seams and 
with veins of gold and silver bearing ores 
and spotted with clay banks, and heard 
the vociferous call made by the whole 
Pacific coast for coal, coke, iron, bricks, 
pottery, and building material, they 
would speedily cause Tacoma's harbor 
to be crowded with ships, and Tacoma 
would contain 100,000 in.iabitants in less 
than two years. And her industries 
would furnish employment to thousands 
of workmen. Strangers would not get 
mired in her streets and bootblacking 
would not be one of the principal indus- 
tries of the town during the winter. 



FOUR IN A ROW. 



St 



The Minnesota Company')! New Ships 
Cleveland ; A New Superintendent. 

R. A. Webster, intimately connected 
with the marine trade of the lakes, and 
for many years a mechanical engineer 
employed by the great Globe Iron Works 
company of Cleveland, and the Hodge 
Engine and Machine works of Detroit, 
has just arrived m Duluth and will be 
superintendent of the Clyde Iron works. 
He is a man of wide experience in marine 
and foundry work, and has an acquaint- 
ance that will secure the works a great 
deal of marine trade. 

Speaking of new steamships, Mr. 
Webster last night said: "Four of the 
monster ships for the Minnesota are in 
the yard of the Globe Iron Works com- 
pany, placed one astern of the other, 
and they make a magnificent row. The 
four started a little over 12C0 feet or a 
quarter of a mile, and almost touch. 
One is soon to be launched, and all will 
be out by July. On these four ships 
and three more in the same yard, and in 
the machine and boiler shoi)s connected 
tnere are about 1300 men employed, and 
the shipbuilding industry is one of 
the great factors in Cleveland's prosper- 
ity. Besides the Globe there are several 
other large yards. 

"I dont believe that Duluth people 
realize how important to this city is the 
McDou?a]l shipyard. It seems 
to me one of the great- 
est manufacturing enterprises of 
the country. They are building the 
engines for one of the McDougall ships 
at the Hodge works at Detroit, where I 
used to work. It is either a fore-and-aft 
or a steeple compound and is a 
economical and powerful engine 
hope in time to be able to do that 
of work here. I have built three 
engines and have compounded a 
number of marine engines." 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Room D, Hunter 
Uock. 



Costa to be Peaceable; Personal Mention; 
Notes of the West End. 
A justice of peace from Herman town, 
who is not generally very peaceable 
when he comes down here, attempted to 
get into a fight with an old man named 
LeMargie in the employ of Alderman 
Kennedy Saturday night, but was 
thrown out of the place. He broke sev- 
eral windows, however, and generally 
tried to make trouble, so he was placed 
under arrest. It ooet him $16 at the 
municipal court yesterday for not being 
peaceable. 

Alexander & Hancock, the proprietors 
of The Paragrapher, dissolved partner- 
ship today. The business will be car- 
ried on by H. E. Alexander at the old 
stand. Mr. Hancock it is understood 
will connect himself with the new West 
Superior daily. 

Tomorrow is the day on which it is 
expected the gas works will be com- 
pleted, although gas will probably not 
be furnished from these works for some 
time. 

Miss Florence Wade, who has been 
visiting with her brother, policeman 
Wade, for some time, returned to her 
home in St. Paul yesterday afternoon. 

Scarlet fever is reported at the home 
of Frank Smithland, 1708 West Superior 
street. This is the first case this year at 
the West End. 

"Queen Mab," Miss Mabel Davidson 
will give an exhibition of fancy skating 
this evening at the Parlor skating rink. 
Rev. J. Jensen, of the Swedish Mission 
church, went to Minneapolis last night 
to visit with friends for a short time. 

Charles Maurer, the Garfield avenue 
barber, went to Prescott, Wis., to visit 
his mother who is ilL 

Rev. Aug. Peterson, of the Norwegian 
Methodist church, has gone to Sand- 
stone for a few days. 

Sleighing parties with cowbells con- 
trived to make the night hideous in the 
West End last night. 

E. B. Heiberg, who visted friends here 
for a few days, went to Chicago yester- 
day afternoon. 

J. A. Scott, of The News, is visiting 
with friends in the Twin Cities. 

A small dancing party was held in 
Svea hall last night. 



very 
We 
class 
large 
large 



TO CLEAN 



An 



SIDEWALKS. 

J udges of 



chief of police. The Eastern Minnesota 
road is notified that the retaining wall 
on Piedmont avenue west is fini6hed,and 
16,000 is due which the company had 
agreed to pa> as its share of the cost. 

SPORTING NOTES. 



The new grounds at Washington will 
have a pavilion after the style of the 
Philadelphia grounds. 

Toronto has forfeited its charter and 
its players are for sale. President Mc- 
Con n ell lost $"20,000 in three years. 

Van Haltren writes to Ed Hanlon 
from the Pacific coast that he will sign 
with the Pittsburg flayers League club. 

It is claimed that Foreman, the Balti- 
more pitcher, has accepted $800 advance 
money from his club, and $G00 from the 
Players league. 

Paul Hines is in Washington looking 
after a position in the congressional 
document room. Paul has been playing 
professionally since 1872, when he 
caught for Nick Youngs Washington 
club. 

Second Baseman Shannon of last year's 
Louisvilles has signed to play short stop 
for the Philadelphia club of the Players' 
league. Dunlap will be transferred from 
Pittsburg to play second for the same 
team. 

There is now no doubt that the Play- 
ers league's promised bomb is in the 
shape of wholesale suits against not 
only double contract signers but the 
players who signed the original Brother- 
hood contract and who have since signed 
with the League. 

A. R. Samuels, the champion sprinter 
of Australia, who won several big handi- 
caps in that country, is on the retired 
list and penniless. In one handicap he 
won over $'i.j,0(X) for his backers and got 
only a pony and saddle for a gift outside 
the prize money and his board. 

One hundred and eight loyal men are 
under contract to the Players league. 
Comiskey will be in Chicago and sign a 
contract Saturday. Thursday's injunc- 
tion case against Ward in New York set- 
tles nothing. In about nine cases out of 
every ten such applications are granted. 
Should it be in Ward's case no point is 
decided. The case will be tried upon its 
merits later. 



The Weather. 

At Bismarck this morning it was 30 
below zero, and the cold wave still re- 
tains its grip over the Northwest with 
predictions of more of it. The local fore- 
cast for the next twenty-four hours is 
colder, with fair weather. 

Looked Like Karly Days. 
A comical sight on Superior street 
this morning was a primitive sled drawn 
by a single ox and driven by a regular 
Rip Van Winkle. The yoke, sled and 
all the trappings were home-made and 
of the rudest description. Quite a crowd 
was attracted and considerable merri- 
ment caused by the strange outfit. 

Their New MUl. 

Soott & Holston are making prepara- 
tions for the erection of a factory on 
Rices Point for sash, door, blind and in- 
terior finish work in connection with the 
old Graff & Murray mill, which they 
will run. The mill building will cost 
$:37,000. 

AMUSEMbNT NOTES. 



Daniel Bandmann's Shakespearean 
company, now thoroughly organized, has 
Ijeen playing in Helena and Missoula, 
Montana, to very large business, and is 
now filling engagemeuLS at Tacoma, 
Seattle and other leading places in 
Washington. Miss Oliver, the leading 
lady, lost her voice temporarily while 
playing in Anaconda through a severe 
cold, but is now fully recovered. Miss 
Ellsworth, who played Ophelia in this 
city, is gaining favorable notices every- 
where for her sympathetic renderings 
and apt study. 

Dancing and Deportment. 

Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No. 113 
West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents', 
Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 

The Herald bindery has the best 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



Smoke the Endion cigar, the finest in 
the market W. A. Pootk & Co. 



The Herald binder}' can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptly. 



For Sale. 

Forty acres at a bargain, six miles out. 
A big snap in this. Come and see about 
it at once. Ekick.son, Stkom & Co., 
211 Pastoret-Stenson building. 



Moner to Loan. 

Mendenhall & Hoopes have money to 
loan in amounts to suit the borrower, at 
the lowest rate of interest. 



Ordinance to that KflTect; 
Klection Appointed. 

At the council meeting last night an 
ordinance was introduced by Alderman 
Long making it unlawful to allow snow 
and ice to accumulate on che sidt-walks 
in front of property by the owners of 
real estate on Superior and First streets 
from Eighth avenue east to Twenty 
fourth avenue west, under penalty of 
from $10 to $25 or imprisonment in the 
county jail. It was referred for revision 
so as to include non-residents, who are 
to be assessed. 

The following judges of election were 
appointed to act at the city election 
Feb. 4: First ward— James Campbell, 
Chas. Banks, C. C. Archer. Second 
ward— Theo. Macey, Geo. T. Neill, Thos. 
Cameron. Third ward, first precinct — 
T. M. Uelinski, N. J. MUler, Robert Os- 
born; second precinct— Colby Smith, C. 

C. Wieland, J. W. Miller; third precinct 
— Geo. F. Ash, C. A. Johnson, John 
Burns. Fourth ward, first precinct — 
H. C. Kendall, Alex. Frazer, Fred T. 
Little; second precinct— C. F. Johnson, 
Ed Patterson, F. J. Marsh; third pre- 
cinct—John Flood, J. M. McDonald, J. 
L. Pember. Fifth ward, first precinct — 

D. Cox, B. Summerfield, Francis Long; 
second precinct — .\. Swordling, G. Ben- 
nison, Geo. McAdams; third precinct — 
W. G. Cressy, John McNamara, Christo- 
pher Hanson. Sixth ward^H. E. Alex- 
ander, D. S. Nickay, Nels N. Oie. 

Considerable minor business was done. 
McArthur Bros, were given an estimate 
on First street of $1685. Property owners 
petitioned for an extension of the water 
mains on Second avenue east from Fifth 
to Sixth street, and along Sixth street 
between Second and Third avenues east. 
Owners wanted Fourth alley between 
Fifth^nd Seventh avenues east sewered 
and guttered. The Spalding charged 
$26.50 for entertainment of Montreal 
guests. City Attorney Smith ga\^ his 
opinion on the liquor license granted to 
L. B. Moore & Co. that it was not legal 
Poundmaster McLellan made report of 
$13.25 receipts for December. Esti- 
mates were ordered paid for. J. W. 
Leng, $141.05; Wolf & Truax, $3,076.66. 
Fire commissioners were instructed to 
sell four old hand hose trucks. The 
judgment of $116.80 against the city in 
favor of F. A. Roberts was ordered paid. 
Bills for the month of December were 
also ordered paid. 

Haskins and others applied to have 
the buildings between Twenty-sixth and 
Twenty-seventh avenues and Michigan 
and Huron streets removed, claiming 
they were a nuisance. Referred to the 



B 



R 




H 



E 



R 



S 



R 



O 



WN 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restauiants, 



-AND— 



TAKE NOTICE I 

We are agents for the celebrated 

Green Point China 



The Best In the World. 



Get our prices and vou will be per- 
fectly Batisfled . 



I 



18 West Superiof Street. 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY, 



MINNESOTA. 



First class In every way. Newly refitted. 
Finest sample room In town. Livery In 
eoanectlon. WILI lAM GRANT, Prop. 

Open November I . 



THE STORY OF A YEAR. 




rHOTOOKAPH 
FROM LIFE 

TAKEN 

ONE YEAIt 

AQO. 




rHOTOORAPH 

FROM LIFI 

AS SHI 

NOW 

AFFEARt. 



"Look on this picture and then on that." The 
aboTe faces are exact reproductions of photo- 
graphs taken from life of Mrs. Morton D. Har- 
lan, who resides at No. S5 West 25th Street, New 
York City. The first one was taken in Novem- 
ber, 1PR7, while in the last sta^ircs of consump- 
tion, abandoned by physicians and mourned by 
friends. The other was taken in I)eoeml)ef, 
1S88, when completely recovered, and entirely 
throuffh the use of Dr. Acker's KnRlish Remedy 
for Consumption. The above pictures are wood 
cuts, but they are true to life and the original 
photographs, taken from life, can be seen at all 
the (irujt stores. Mrs. Harlan's consumption 
be?an as consumption usually does, with a 
cough in the mornmf:, raisine of phlegm, tired 
and depressed feelinifs, a lack of appetite, the 
loss of flesh and pains throughout the body. 
She did not realize her extreme danger «iitil it 
beoamq, almost too late, but she is in perfect 
health to-day. Dr. Acker's English Kemedy 
for Consumption Is sohl by all refutable dru(} 
gists. You can't afford to be tcithout it. 

For Sale in Duluth by Boyce & Totman 



CHICHCSTCR-S ENGLISH 

PENNYROYAL PILLS 




RED CROSS DIAMOND BRAND, 

H«fe ktij alwav-i r<.-)i&hle. l.»dle«, 

aak PruKzi'*C f>'r IHamond Brand, In 
re«i« nirikllio tK)X<-!i, >i(-ftlM with blue 

rlbtK>o. Take no other. All pillt 
io pftat«boani tKixiM, pink wrftpi«"* <^r« 
4«Bc«roa« couBterfeltA. Kend 4«. 
(fltftoips) for p»rclaulftrs, UsUmoalals 
**U«U«r for Ltt4l««»'> in Istter, bj 
mall* Same Paper. 



Mortgages Negotiated, 

6 AND 7 HER CENT. 



Lowest rates for all sizes and grades of 
security. Before borrowing elsewhere In- 
quire of 

N. J. UPHAM, 



Under First Nat. Bank. 
NATIONAL BANK BUIl.DINQ. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



NEW HOTEL. 

^THE 

METHOPOLITAN 



St. Paul, Minn., 

Cor. 4tli and \rRBblii«U»n S«a. 

On Cable Car Line. Best Table in the Norlu 
west. Kates KUW and I'pwards. 

W U. Bakkxs. Mauager. 



Certificate ol Hmended 



ARTICLES OF INCORPORAIION 



OF LAKESIDE LAND COMPANY. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA. ( „ 
County or St. Louis, (■"" 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, 
That wo. Ozora P. Stearns, president, 
aud Wm. C Sartfeut, secretary, of Lakuside 
Land company, a corporation ortranlzed and 
doing liusinese under the laws ol" Minnesota, 
being duly and "overally sworn, do horeljy lor- 
tify and depose that at a regular int-ctlogof 
the shareholders of the said Lakeside Land 
compuny. duly called aud held at the offices of 
said company at Duluth. Minnesota, on the 
fourth day of Jamiury, I«IO, at two o'clock in 
the afternoon of said day, the articles uf Incor- 
l)oration of sai,'. coriHjration wore amended so 
na to Increase the capital stock of said corpor- 
ation from one hundred and twcuty-flve thou- 
sand dollars, to Ave hundred thousand dol- 
lars and so as to Increase the number 
of shanks in the capital stock of said corpor- 
ation from twelve hundred and fifty to five 
thoasand, by amending Article 3 of said 
i>riginal articles of Incorporation, which fixes 
the amount of the capital stock of said cor- 
lx)ratiou at one hundred and twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars, so as to read as follows, to-wlt: 

ARTICLE 3. 

"The amount of the capital stock of the cor- 
poration 8.hall be five hundred thousand dol- 
lars, (*500,t)UU.OO) ; to be paid In on call of the 
board of directors." 

And by amending Article 7 of said original 
articles of incoriK>ratlon, which fixes the num- 
ber of shares In the capital stock of said cor- 
porpation at twelve hundred aud fifty, so as 
to road as follows, to-wlt : 

ARTICLE 1. 

"The number of shares in the capital stock 
of the corporation shall be five thousand (6,000), 
each of the par value of one hundred dollars 
(*100 00), which shares when fully paid up 
shall be nou-asst«8ablo." 

That there were present at said meeting, 
who voted In favor of said amendments a 
majority la number of the shareholders of 
said corporation, who held a majority in 
amount of the shares of stock of the same. 

OZOKA P. Stb.\rns, 
Wm, C, Sargent. President. 

Secretary. 



OFriCE OF REOI.STER OF DKED8. 



L 








FOR SALE 



50-14--ln Hcreage, - 
49-15--lri Hcreaje, 
Superior Street 
Dock Propertj, - 



1. 



|UUU| 



Lots for sale as low 
as $25 each. 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



NOTICE. 



The regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of the First National Bank of Tower 
will be held at its office In Tower, Minnesota. 
OD Tuesday, January 14tli, 1H90, between the 
hours of 10 o'clock a, m. and 4 o'clock p. m., 
for the election of directors and for such other 
business as may come before the meeting. 
G. W. Hkktges, 

Tower, Minn., Cashier. 

December 13th. 1889. 



HARWOOD'S 

Citj Transportation Freight and Express, 

DRAYS. 

Office, 17 First Aveaue Weet. 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFiCE 

17 Pirat Avenue West. 



FOR SALE 



Forty Acres 



ADJOINING 



WANTED ! 




Purchasers for 



]k\] Valuable and Nice-Lying Lots 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



-:- WILL BE SOLO VEBY CHEAP -:- 



e= 



-ALSO- 



Three Goorl Building Lots on 




Near Third avenue east 




All these are well located and very acce'^sible. 
Good schools and graded streets close jy. 



Apply by letter or in person to 



" E D ," 



C^fL.IBE :E3::E]ie.i^ILID. 



CAUTION 





-AT A- 



Bargain 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this 'th 
day of January. 1890. W . E Pbrrv. 

Notary Public, 
St. Louis county, Slinnesota. 
Notarial Seal, 
St. Louis Co.. Minn. 



r 



STATE OF MINNESOTA. 

County of St. Louis. 

I hereby certify that the wiihin articles were 

flle<] in this office for record on the Mb day of 

January, A. D. IHW), at 3:10 i/clock p. m., and 

was duly recorded in IJookG of Miscellaneous 

paire 6. 

Amos Shephard, 
Kotfisterof Deeds. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, ( 
Department or State, f 
1 hciptiy certify that the within Instrumen t 
was tiled for reconl in this office on the 11th 
day of January A. D. 1890, at H o'clock a. 
m , aud was duly recorded in book Y of Incor- 
porations on page 270. 

H. Mattson, 
Secretary of State. 

Jan. 13, U. 15, 16. 17, 18, 30. 



DiLE.C. Wests 



"W. Li. Dougias' name and the pri 
> H H H HH HH^M are st.imp.d on the lx)ttom of all Shoe? 
i\^ I 1%^!^ advertised by him before tearing hu 
factory; th s protects the wearers against high prices and inferior gOOds 
If your dea er does not keep the style or kind you watit, or ofl'ers you shoes withon 
W. Li. Douglas* name and price stamped on them, ai\d says they are just a 
good, do not be deceived thereby, but send direct to the F'actory for you can ge 
what you V ant by return mail, postage paid. Dealers make more profit on un- 
known shoss that are not warranted by anybody ; therefore do not be induced to 
buy shoes that have no reputation. Buy only those that have "W. Li. Doufirls^ 
name and the price stamped on the bottom, and you are sure to get full value for 
yourmone>'. Thousands of dollars are saved annually in this country by the 
wearers of W . L. Douglas' Shoes. In ordering by mail state whether you 
want Congress, Button or Lace, London cap, toe, plain French toe, or narrow cap 
toe, and be sure to give size and width you wear. I can fit any foot that is not de- 
formed, as my shoes are made in a great variety of widths, sizes and half sizes, I 
guarantee i fit, prompt delivery and perfect satisfaction or money refunded upon 
return of the shoes in good condition. W. x.. DOUGI.AS, Brockton, Maaa. 

W. L. DOUGLAS 
$ 3 SHOE cen^t'LImen. 

Is a fine eeaiuless calf shoe, with Dongola 
tops and Oak l.e4»ther bottoms. Tliey are 
made iu Congress, Uutton and Lace on I<oii- 
don Cap Toe, Narrow Cap Toe, and Plain 
French Toe LastK, in sizes fron> 5 to 11, in- 
cluding half ftiZfS and in all wifltb-. If you 
have been paviuR from S5 to 06 for ahoee 
ofthis fiuality do notdo ao longer. One pair 
will wear tin long as two pairs of oommon 
•hoes sold by dealers that are not warranted 
bjr the nianii'facturer. 

Our claims for this shoe aver all other SS 
»es advertised, are : 
lit. It <'ontain8 better materlaL 

It is more styUah, better flttloK an<2 

durable. 

It gives better general satisfaction. 

It costs more money to make. 

It saves more money~forthe consnmer. 

It is sold by more dealers throoshoot 

theC. S. 

It's great snccess is dne to merit. 

It cannot be duplicated by any other 

manufarturtor. 

It is the best in the woridt and has a 

larger demand than any other SS 

shoe advertised. 




I 



Sd. 

8d. 
4th. 
6tli. 
6th. 

7th. 
8th. 

9t1i. 



00 QQQ X, ill be paid to any pt>n«on wlio will prove the above statements to be ' 
The Fo [lowing Unes will be found to be of the Same Quality of Ezoellenea. 

- GtNrJNE HAND-SEWED, which takes the plaoe ci cus- 
tom-ma le shoes that cost from $7 to t<^ 

THE OKIGINAL A>'D OTiJJV HAND-SKWED VTELT 
Si SHOK. Equals custom-made shoes costing from <6 to *8. 
FOR POI-ICEMEN. Railroad Men and Letter Cvrim aH 
wc.ir thci-,. Smooth inside as a Hand-Sewed Shoe. NoTacks 

.)r Wax Tliread to hurt the feet. 

IS UNEXCEU-ED FOR HEATT WEAK, heat Calf Shot 

for tl'e price. 

WORKINOIWAN'S. Is the best in the worid for rough wears 

one pair o'-.^iit tc weai a man a year. 

IS EQl'.VI^ TO SHOES THAT COST FROM S3 TO 93 JM. 

One pair will wear longer than any shoe ever sold at the pcice. 

FOR BOYS is the best School Shoe in the world. 



$5.00 SHOE 
S4.00 SHOE 
$3.50 SHOE 

$2.50 SHOE 
$2.25 SHOE 
$2.00 SHOE 
$2.0OSHOE ^ ^,^ ^ ^ 

--. ,_,_ ^|_|^%P TOUTH'S SCHOOL, gives the small Boys a chance to 
JHI a 7 « ) W M W tL the best shoes in th? world. 



JOl mad ! in Congress, Button and Lace 



Inquire of 



SCHILLING'S OHCHESTRft 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished. 



ROOM 4U PUSTOREUIEIISOII BLOCK, 

DULUTH, - MINN. 



NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT 

Speoiflc f(ir Hyst.ria, Plzzine.-^', Fitsi. NcuraltriK, Wake 
Illinois, Montnl D<pi-..».sioii. Soiteninp of the liraiii, re- 
>ultin|t In in»niiity iiiul Icri.lirnf to misery 'lecav and 
ile.ith. Prtm.iiurt' Old Agre. Ilnrrt-nncS'*. Loss oi rower 
inc-ilbcr isei. iHvoluiilnry I.os>es, and Stiernmtorihuea 
■aiised liv over-exertion of the brain, Kelf-ntuse or 
ovor-lidnlpreiice. Each box contains one monlhV treat- 
ment. $1 alM>t. or six for t^, hent by mail prt-iKHid. 
With each order for hix boxes, will hend pun haser 
guarantee to refund momy If the treatment faiis to 
eure. Guarantees issaetl aud gouulno sold uoiy by 

Boyce & Totman. Phoenix Drug Store, and 
7 West SuiHsrlor street, sole agents, Duluth, 
Mlna. 



L. ^., 



W. L. DOUGLAS $3 AND $2 SHOES 



FOR 

^,^_, ^ww^ — -- ^ ^— LADIES. 

Both Ladie: ' Shoes are made in sizes from i to 7, including half sizes, and B. C, D, E and EE width*. 

STYLES OF LADIES' SHOES. 
••Th- iVfiK-h Ooera." "The Spanish Arth Opera," "The American Commop. 
Sens?" ? The Meil^m* Common-sense." AH n.ade in Bntton In the Lateat Stylea. 
Al»'> French Opera in Front Laoe, on 93 Shoe only. 

""^ FOR SALE BY SUFFEL&CO. 



Postoffice Box A A. 



MEMBERS OF THE 

DDLDTH CLEARIH6 HOUSE ASSOCIATIOM. 



American Exchange Bank 
Bell &. lEyster's Bank 
First Niitional Bank 
Security Bank of Duluth 
State Bmk of Duluth 
National Bank of Connmerce 
Marine Bank 



CAPITAL. 

$300,000 
100,000 

1 ,000,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
260,000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

1 0,000 

1 00,000 

26,000 



/ 



*« i^ " ■ ' ■ ■ <— J 



m. i.rt " i .1, jL i L.i Ml m ■! 



k 



' 



>yi w^ a<r»*"» ' ^<c )*i>M 



-h 



\\ 



BALANCE. 

County Auditor and 



Books of the 

treasurer Examined. 

Pursuant to the legal requirements 
the county commissioners appointed two 
committee to examine the books and ac- 
oountss of the county auditor and treas- 
urer. The following is the county audi- 
eor's semi-annual trial balance on Janu- 
ary 11, with the committee's report : 

DEBIT ACCOCNT. 

State school text books » *?J fS 

Refunded q o-^ Yi 

County poor ■••■• "^ o^ 

C.iuutj' special road fund isswoS 



. P, jobusoo, county ireaaurer. 



There is very little to write of today's 
wheat market. The visible supply de- 
crease, large as it was, had no influence 
on prices. There were no public cables, 
but private ones reported the markets 
on the other side as dull and weak. 
Other markets dropped during the day 
from I4 to ;'8, but there was a firmness 
here that held values up to yesterday's 
figures. 

Cash No. 1 hard closed at 79 for regu- 
lar and 79 ^4 for fresh receipts^ No. 1 
northern, 7d for regular and ~Q% for 
fresh receipts, and No. 2 northern at 72 
for regular and 74 for fresh receipts. 
January closed at 79 for 1 hard and 7(3 
for 1 northern; May 
closed at 84 '2; May 
closed at Sl;^4. 

The Daily .Hovement. 

Cars on track: Wheat, 15. 
tion: WUeat, No. 1 hard 5, No, 
em 12. No. 2 northern 3; corn, 6; oats, 5. 
Rdjjipii: vV jdtc, 2,4U bu; corn, 17,093 
bu; oats, 23,759 bu. Shipments: Wheat, 

Minneapolis reported 2'J 
on track an. I Chicago 72. Minneapolis 
re\;eiptii for the day were 128,7(30 bu and 
shipments 27,260 bu. The visible sup- 
ply of wheat decreased 578,000 bu. 

New Yorii stocks*. 
The following are closing prices on the 
New York stock exchange as reported by 
W. W. BUI Jt Co.: 

Today 



Total »1».815 85 

CREDIT ACCOCNT. 

County school fund • • • • • • ^^ . W-iw 

School district Park Point •l'?55;*> 

" No. 1 •iio.lO 

•• No. a 277.82 

" No. 3 2M.M 

•• No. 7 !».» 

No. 8 174.07 

•• No. 10 9».B0 

" No. 11 69.91 



Village of Duluth, bond Interest 

sinking fund 

TownofGneser *13m 

" Breiiuntr ww,o» 



3,178.5? 
i.fAi. 10 
6,»ie.9tt 




F 




liUJ^UTH EVKNEPfG HEEAIiD: JANUARY 14 1890 




1 hard 
No. 1 



sold and 
northern 



Inspec- 
1 North- 



Chloatro, Burllnsrtt>n & Qulncy. 106H 
AmeriL-an < ottou Oil *>3i 



Mi-soun Pacirt 



Nort Hern P<iciac preferred "'i\\ 

Chiiafe'o. .MUwiiuKee Jc St. Paul.. BC)* 

Suirar I'rual oS^ij 

Gas rrast «6H 

touisviile Je Nashville 86?» 

Chicagt><S( Northwestern 1104 

Bock Island W^ 

Lake Shore lOtH 

Headiug 36:Sii 

Kiclimoud Terminal ~V% 

Atchison *>*» 

Delaware & ^.ackawanaa 135Si 

Wfsiern ' nion..... »3^ 

Loud Trust a) 

Union Pacillc •7)4 

OU lot*. 

>'ew York Visible. 

New York, Jan. U.— Produce exchauKe 
Statement ot visible suppl> : Whett, 33,17t>.421; 
decrease, 5TT.5"i3; corn. 10,8S{.btf5; iucrease, 
l,»44,ai3; oats, i,y6,Jti!», decrease, lSo,7iJ2; rye, 
l.:4»i.«);; increase, ol.mi; barley, 2,Us3,a34; de- 
crease, 101, sa. 



Yester- 
day. 
107 
31 

7SH 
73H 
t»<\ 
MS 

♦es 

86^4 
110^ 

97 
104^, 

36*. 

21 S 

3BS 
13U^ 

«'•* 



The Minneapolis Close. 

MisMEAPOLis, Jan. U. — Cloeing- quotations — 
No. 1 hard, January, 79: February, 79; 
Mav. SJi*. on tiatk, 19' t. No. 1 northern, 
Jatiu-'y. 77; Feb. 77; May, til: ou 
trttck. 77'2'5,'». No. 2 northern, January, 74: 
February 74; May. 78: on tracs, 74<a7t5. 



Chicago Close. 

Chic Jtoo, Jan. 14 —1:15 p. m. 
flrtner; January, 77; May, 81^. 
January, A>: May, 31^. 



olaee— Wheat 
Corn. &rm : 



High Dignitaries. 
The Father Mathew society held its 
weekly meeting last evening. Arch- 
bishop Ireland, accompanied Bishop 
Cotter, of Winona, and bishop McGol- 
rick of this city entered nnd listened to 
an address of welcome by president 
MaGinnis. The archbishop and bishops 
8p>oke hnef ly to to the society on tem- 
perance. Following program was car- 
ried out: 

Piano solo Miss Costello 

Reading Mrs i'iielao 

Song Mies Poirler 

Kecitation Master Franli MaGinnis 

Pi mo solo MIm Lucia Judd 

Baiiju an I piana solo Mr. and .Yliss Judd 

Temperance song ... The Society 

The Courts, 

Chas. Seburg paid $5 tine this morn- 
ing for being drunk yesterday. Pat 
Keogh was given seven days for a simi- 
lar privilege. Chas. Lund.ren for dis- 
orderly conduct, fighting on the street 
and raising hades generally was hned $5 
and coitfi, and John England for con- 
ducting himself in an unseemly and ob- 
streperous manner generally on the 
streets, paid i~ for his fun. A couple 
more drunks were sent up for the usual 
recreation. 



Surplus fund 

Uedemption fund 

County revenue fund .... 
•• jail fund 

bond interest 

siuliiug fund 

i-oad and bridge 

interest 

Tax collections 



bond 



882.90 

497.81 

3,009.11 

20,ts>3 7ti 

32,402.69 

3,799.(>9 

13,39163 

777.09 
$45,042.Ki 

Total «132,815.86 

To the Board of County Commissioners : We, 
appointed to examine the boolts and accounts 
otthecouuty auditor, report that wo have 
exauiinod the same aud find them correct. 

Committee. 

The following is the county treasurer's 
trial balance, on the same day, with the 
committee's report: 

DEBIT ACCOCNT. 

County poor fund • 3,234 13 

Cou u ty special road fund 

Kelundcu 

Statetest books ■ 

Cash 



929 97 

59 67 

601 »6 

138,090 33 



Total «l3a.815 86 

CREDIT .4.CC008T. 

County gPL.eral fund •^•**?"" 



Cmnty jaltfimdr..'.' 33,402 69 

Town ot Breilung $8»» 38 

Town of Gnesen 13 6:. 



883 90 
3,178 5» 
2.643 lU 
2,000 11 
3,799 69 
45,042 83 



School districts 

Village of Duluth bonds. Interest. 

Kedeuiplion fund 

New county bonds 

Tax c-olltctioiis ,., ,< i --i 

County siuliiug fund ."i^Ti li' 

Village smiting fund 

County school fund 

Surplus fund 

County bridge and road bonds — 



6,916 96 
421 00 
497 81 
777 09 



Total *1SJ,815 85 

The following was the disposition of 

county funds on Jan. 11, 1890: 

Am. National Ex hange bank, N. Y. tl3.463 10 

first National, Ouluth 16,959 45 

Bell & Eystcrs. Uuluth 43,678 73 

American Exchange, Dululh 24,756 78 

stale Bank, Uuluth 16,901 lO 

Advaiit-ed to city treasvrer 10,«X1 (X) 

Cash on hand *.3*I 18 

Total *128,090 33 



A SUCCE SSFUL AFFAIR. 

Encampineut Installation Last Night : 
Those put iu Positions. 

The public installation of officers of 
Duluth encampment No. 36, I. O. O. F., 
took place last night at Odd Fellows 
hall. There was a large attendance, 
both of members of the order and ladies. 
The occasion was an extremely enjoyable 
one, rendered more so by the playing of 
some choice music by Schilling's or- 
chestra. 

The installing officer was D. E. Estis 
ot Lake City. The officers installed 
■sere: T. W. Hugo, chief patriarch; E. 
Ix Winge, senior warden; H. McLeod, 
high priest; R. E. Patterson, junior 
warden; C. Schiller, treasurer; 
James Sampson, recording scribe; Wil- 
liam Stephens, financial scribe. After 
the installation Mr. Estes delivered a 
very interesting and humorous lecture. 
Kev. J. E. Lathrop of West Duluth, also 
made a very interesting speech. Mr. 
Jones, a St. Paul brother, also made 
some good remarks which were favor- 
ably received. The affair was a very in- 
teresting and pleasant one to all con- 
cerned. 

The installation of officers of Zenith 
City Odd Fellows lodge did not take 
place last Monday as arranged on ac- 
count of several of the officers el< ct 
being laid up with the grip. The instal- 
lation will be held nex Monday with un- 
usual attendant ceremonies, a banquet 
being one of the attractions. 



010 SOME mm\%. 



The 



Chamber of Commerce 
Has a Lively Business 
Session. 



Sault Canal and the Public 

Building Take Up Much 

Time. 



Today's session of the Chamber of 
Commerce was mostly taken up with 
matters pertaining to the improvement 
of the Sault canal and the other lake 
ways. A letter was read from George 
Ely, urging the Chamber to send rep 



H 



REAL ESTATE. 



K Record of the Keal Instate Transfers for 
•i\ Hoars Ending at Xoon. 

Joseph Dodge to Annie Keen, lots 5 and 
block 12, and lots 6 and 6, block 19, 



i 4,000 



3,200 



250 



250 



Haze.w<x)d addition to Oneota 

Willis. I Hoiines U) Elinor M Smith, lot 
7. block 12, Kirst division. West Du- 
luth 

Levi M Wilicutts to A«a Dailey, uo'dl- 
vide<l 'i of lot 42. Minnesota avenue. 
L'pt>.T Duluth 

Hertcrt K -pencer to Asa Dailey, undi- 
vided I, of lot 42, Minnesota avenue, 
L pi)- r Duluth 

Elr*ridge F Dodge to Sarah P Harley, 
loi.^ 5 :ind 6, block 7, Dodges aildliion 
to Duluth 

Elbridge F Dodge to Jo^ph H Hariey, 
lots i and 4, block 7, Dodges addition 
to Duluth 

M F Hantion to K H Palmer, the s^ of 
the seSi. and the s'i of the swk, 33- 
69-1' 

Ho-»a Fiedler to M Wheeler, the eH of 
the nw;4, 3-49-15 a OOO 



700 



00 



4,000 



8 transfers ; consideration 119,100 



CITY BRIEFS. 



will 



give an 



for 



The Mozart Association 
entertainment next week. 

A Malone, N. i'., business man is look- 
ing for a location in Duluth for a car- 
riage repository. 

"Zig-Zag" is the next attraction 
booked at Temple Opera. It comes Jan 
27 and 28, 

There is a considerable demand 
East End acreage. 

The Lillian Lewis company goes from 
Duluth to Tower, where it will play for 
one night, opening the Mclnnis opera 
house. 

The assessment rolls for the construc- 
tion of a sewer on Michigan street 
between Seventh and Eeighth avenues 
west is at the city treasurer's office. 
Also for a stone gutter between Nine- 
teenth and Twentieth avenues west. 
This 18 the last day of grace to pay the 
assessments before the ten per cent pen- 
alty is added. The amount for the 
sewer is 111.56.76; for the gutter, 1228.09. 
The assessments are about half paid in. 

A son of Col. Fred Eaton of this city 
won the 11000 prize offered by Youth's 
Companion for the best serial story. 
There were over 200 competitors for the 
prize. 

Register Kesume. 

At The Spalding: J. F. Jackson, C 
T. Cushrnan, W. A. Morse, Boston; 
George W. Hall. Indianapolis; Silas B. 
Walsh, R. W. Stevens, A. B. Driscoll 
William Ryan, St. Paul; C. L. Foster, 
Milwaukee; George W. G. Ferris, Pitts-' 
burg; W. E. Watson, Dawson Springs, 
Ky., W. A. Wade, New York;T. W^. 
Graves, Minneapolis; E. J. Owens, 
Chicago. 

At the St. Louis: W. W. McFarlane, 
Henry Hosmer, C. H. Anderson, John 
Megins. St. Paul; C. R Kelly, Augusta; 
W. B. Mills. Madison, Wis., T. C. Weeks, 
Souix City; John Wisdon, Willow River; 
S. S. Johnson, Barnum. 



JACK FRO ST VS . JUSTICE. 

Freeze Oat at the Court House; Murderer 
Sinimon.s in Court. 

"Where is the janitor?" thundered the 
entire list of officials at the courthouse 
this morning, and the janitor appeared. 
"Give us more steam," vociferated the 
freezers. "You can't have it — the water 
supply is shut off" — was the janitor's 
reply, and he carried the day. 

Judge Ensign s court adjourned to his 
office early in the morning, but Judge 
Stearns got through with a small amount 
of business. The Italian fruit store case 
was given to the jury, and Louis Mur- 
ray, indicted for gambling, demurred. 
The motion was over-ruled and a plea of 
not guilty entered. The continued case 
of the State vs. Anton Schulte was called. 
The defendant being charged with keep 
ing his saloon open on election day. R. 
P. Edson, his attorney, moved to quash 
the indictment, and the court sustained 
the motion. The continued case of the 
State vs. Joseph Gorseline came up and 
the defendant moved to continue, but 
the court passed it. It will come up 
again in a few days. 

At this juncture the Tower murderer, 
John Simmons, came in and asked for 
counsel. The court appointed R. P. 
Edson. 

The civil calendar was resumed and 
No. 127, Thoe. B. Perry vs. H. C. Nelson, 
receiver, was called and is on trial. The 
criminal calendar will be resumed next 
Monday. The court room presented a 
peculiar appearance, the judge, officers, 
jury counsel and spectators all being 
buttoned up in overcoats, and in some 
instances a hat or cap appeared. 



resentatives to do missionary work with 
congress, before which the Sault appro- 
priation bill will soon come. Mr. Ely 
also sent the following telegram: "The 
Sault canal bill will come before the 
senate Thursday. It should be seen to 
that Duluth, St. Paul and Minneapolis 
have representatives on the ground." 

Senator C. K. Davis also communicat- 
ed with the Chamber as follows: "Sen- 
ator Frye tells me he proposes to take 
up the Sault bill Thursday." 

The Boston chamber of com- 
merce sent the Duluth Chamber 
resolutions endorsing the legislative 
measure for the improvement of the 
waterways of the great lakes. Secretary 
Phelps urged upon the Chamber the 
necessity ot sending representatives to 
Washington to fight for the Sault bill. 
The bill, so the secretary thought, 
would pass the senate. Where Duluth 
would have to do some good work would 
be with the house. 

Hon. John C. Sargent sent correspond- 
ence with Senator Spooner, in which 
Mr. Spooner denies having introduced 
or possessing any intention of 
putting before the senate any 
measure against bridging the 
Minnesota Point canal. A draft of 
Mr. Comstock's Duluth public building 
appropriation bill, was received and filed. 
William Gale communicated with the 
Chamber on the Lind bill, that provides 
for 'he division of Minnesota into judi- 
cial districts. The matter was referred. 

A resolution endorsing the national 
board of trade and favorably considering 
the invitation to send delegates to Wash- 
ington at the meeting of the board next 
spring was passed. The secretary of the 
National Educational association wrote 
the Chamber, that the annual meeting 
of the organization would be held 
at St. Paul next summer. It 
was expected that fully 20,000 
people would be in attendance. It was 
requested that Duluth make prepar- 
ations for entertaining the visitors, as 
many of them will come to this city. 

The committee on Ontario assest.ments 
and the committee to discuss with old 
Superior people the harbor improve- 
ments at the head of the lakes asked for 
further time in which to report. Meesrs. 
A. S. Coffin, T. Q. Hall, John McGol-ick 
and C. C. Hartman were admitted to 
membership. 

k resolution was introduced, author- 
izing the appointment of a committee 
to formulate plans for the proper ob- 
servance and celebration of the event of 
the introduction of the Chanil)er into its 
new quarters March 1st. A banquet 
will probably be part of the program. 



Who'll Get It ? 

The J. F. Erickson stock of drugs 
seized under a chattel mortgage fore- 
closure, and which was to have been 
sold today will not be sold until tomor- 
row, and probably not then. A firm of 
West End attorneys secured entrance to 
the building at the lime the sale was to 
have taken place, levied on the stock 
and demanded the keys of the building, 
which the custodian refused to give up. 
They thereupon placed another man in 
the building to watch, and the sale was 
postponed until tomorrow. There are 
several chattel mortgages, some covering 
stock and fixtures, others on stock and 
others on fixtures, while Tuft, the Bos- 
ton soda-water fountain man, claims the 
fountain. Affairs are muddled, and un- 
less an amicable settlement is reached 
outside the courts creditors will realize 
but little. 




POWDER 

Absolutely Pure. 



This powder never varies A marvel of pur- 
ity, strength and wholesoraenosB. More eco- 
nomical than the ordinary kinds, and 
cannot be sold in competition with the multi- 
tude of low test, short weight, alum or phos- 
phate powders. Sold only In cans. Boyai 
Baking Powdkb Co.. 106 WaU street, N. Y. 



PIONtER FUEL CO., 



Jan. 



WKATHKR FORECAST. 

14. —Forecast for Duluth and 



vicinity for 24 hours cummencino 10 a.m. 
today: Fair weather; stationary tem- 
perature. 

Observer, Signal Office. 



COAL 



CROSS ma lehigh, 

FR[E BUmilNG, 
mmii L BIIUMINOUS. 



e 



WOOD 



CONIELLSVILLE 
y GAS HOUSE. 



Dry Maple, 

Hard Mixed, 

Slabs, 

Ckigiugs. 



COKE 



mm PBOMPTiy oelivebed 



TO ANY PART CF THE CITY 



Office: Hotel St. Louis, 326 W. Saperior St. 



YARD: 
Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Qarfield Avenur 
Rices Point. 



w 



ANTEI>— Two kitchen girls at Hotel St. 
Louis. 



Mortgage Sale. 



THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON, Proprietor. 



Strictly First-Class in all Appointments. 



DULUTH. 



MINN. 



A. FITGER & GO'S 



Lake Superior Brewery 



(b the largest In the State if MId lesota ou aide 
of the Twli CItlci , 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 



—AND— 



INSURANCE 



Rooms 
DULUTH, 



I. 2, 



Exchange BIdg. 

MINN. 



Notice to ConlfactoFS. 



Sealed proposals will be received at the of- 
fice of the undersigned until the 36lh day of 
January, IHWI, for the erection and completion 
of IW) dwelling houses, more or loss, at West 
Duluth, Minn., for the Minnesota Iron Car 
company, according to plans and speciUcitions 
pre|>ared by the undersigned and now on file 
at his office. Each contractor estimatiog on 
this work will be rtniuirod to submit with his 
proposal, a prot)erly executed bond of two 
re.si>oii»il)le Rnr»'tics In the sum of $.">H0 as a 
guarantee that In ca.s(> the contract i^i awarded, 
lie will within a reasonable time execute acon- 
iract and bond satisfactory to the owners. 

The owners reserve the right to reject any 
or all bids. 

O. G. Tkaphagen, 
Architect, 
Rooms 510, 611, 512 and 613 First National bank 

building, Duluth, Minn. 




o 
o 

cc 

LU 

o 
q: 
O 

O 

I- 

co 

h 
z 
< 

Q. 



GBEftT SACRIFICE SIILE 




/ 





< 



UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



Northern PMclflcShort Line. 

DDLCTH TO srPEBIOa. 



With Blood in Their Kjm. 

Ed Ingalls telegraphed today to St. 
Paul to learn whether the committee 
appointed to investigate the .Vmerican 
Building & Loan association could have 
audience with the governor tomorrow. 

No reply has yet been received but it 
is understood the kovernor intends to 
push the matter to the end. A private 
conference will probably be had with the 
officers by the governor and attorney 
general before the committee goes down, 
though it may be required to be present 
at the conference. As soon as the status 
of the company is ascertained the exam 
iner will wire the committee as to what 
action to take. 



WEST DULUTH. 



Another Sudden Heath Frona Fneamonia; 
General News Notes. 

The grip has fastened its death deal- 
ing talons around another ot our citi- 
zens, Mr. O. C. King, generally known as 
Dick. He was taken sick Friday morn- 
ing and passed away last night at IL 
Dick was 39 years of age, married and 
leaves a wife to mourn his sudden and 
untimely death. Mrs. King has the 
sympathies of all the community and the 
good wishes of everyone. Grand Rapids, 
Mich., papers please copy. 

The lecture in the Congregational 
church last night was very interesting, 
and enjoyed by a fair size<l audience. 

M. L. McMmn is attacked with the 
grip and was unable to attend to his 
duties last night as secretary of the 
West Duluth Building and Loan associ- 
ation. 

Union services are being held each 
night this week in the Baptist and 
Presbyterian chnrch respectively. 



Prepare for the grand skating carnival 
at the West End Parlor skating rink, 
Twenty-tirst avenue west and Superior 
street, Kriday evening, Jan. 17. Three 
good prizes to be given away, one for the 
tinest ladies suit, and one to the gentle- 
man with finest suit, also one to the per- 
son wearing the most comical suit. 
Come and have a good time. Walker's 
military band will furnish music. 

r. M. Erick.son, Proprietor. 
Capt. S. G. Johnson, Manager. 



METROPOLITAN GROCERY STORE. 

Knlarged. Kemodeie<i and Refltted ; A 

Fine Establishment. 

The above store which has always 
held the lead in the fine grocery trade 
has found larger quarters necessary, and 
seventy feet has been added to the 
original store, exactly doubling the floor 
surface and giving a total area of 140x25 
feet. Simon Clark, the proprietor, now 
carries the largest retail stock of family 
groceries in the Northwest, and while 
giving his customers the benefit of the 
wide and choice assortment to select 
from, makes a specialty of furnishing 
goods in unbroken packages to families 
at wholesale rates. Every article in 
stock is bought from first hands, thus 
saving the intermediate profit of the 
middlemen who often claim the lion's 
share. It will be useless to quote prices 
as they are entirely governed by quality, 
and the cheapest goods are often the 
dearest in the long run. The goods are 
all of the finest grades the market 
affords and consistent with quality, will 
be sold at orices which will compare 
favorably with leading Northwestern 
dealers. Families desirous of saving 
money in their purchasing of supplies 
would do well to call at the Metropoli- 
grocery store 113 West Superior 



Default having been made In the payment 
ofthesumof three hundied and sixty 50-100 
dollars, ($360 60-100) principal and interest which 
Is claimed to be due at the dat** of this notice 
upon a certain mortgage duly executed and 
dtiivered by Frank Doyle, a bachelor,to.)am c 
B. Howard and Alexander H. Davis, bearing 
date the tenth day of November, A. D. 18«f, 
and duly recorded in the office of the register 
of deo<ls in and for the county of Salut Louis 
and state of Minnesota, ou the 12ih day of 
November A. D. 18M<, at 9 o'clock a. m.. In 
book '"M" of mortgagres, on page 2tiS; and no 
action or proceeding ai law or otherwlne hav- 
ing been instituted to recover the debt se- 
cured by said mortgage, or any part thereof: 

Now, therefore, notice is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale C4)ntalned in said 
miirtgage, and pursuant to the statute in sucli 
case made ami provided, the said mortgage 
will be foreclos«Hl. and the premises descrll>ed 
In and covered by said mortgage, viz: Lots 
numl>ered six (6\ seven (T) and eight (Si aud 
tlie northeast quarter (ne"*) of the southeast 
Huarter (se!*) of section numbcre<l twenty -two 
i'£i), all in township No slxtjHine (till north ot 
range No. twelve (12j west of the fourth (4th) 
principal meridian. In St. I»ui8 county, and 
slate of .Minnesota, with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances, will !)<■ sold at public auction, 
to the highest bidder for casii, to pay said debt 
and interest, and the taxes (if any )()u said prom- 
ises, ^nd twenty-flve dollars, attorney's fees, 
a.s stipulated in and by said mortgage In case 
of foreclosure, and the disbursements allowed 
by law; which sale will oe ma<le by the shertlT 
of said St. Louis county, at the front door of 
the court house. In the city of Duluth. in said 
ct)unty aud state, on the Stth day 
of January, A. D. ISK). at I0:»' o'clock a m. on 
that day. subject to redemution at any time 
within one year from the day of sale, aa pro- 
vided by law. 

Dated December 13th, A. D. 1889. 

J.\MEs n. Howard, 

and 
Alexandkb H. Davis, 
R. N. Marble, Mortgagees. 

Attorney. 

Dec. 14-21-28. Jan. 4-11-18-25. 



Notice to Contractofs. 



Except Sunday. ., 
Except Sunday. .. 
Except Sunday. .. 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 

Daily , 

Daily 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday... 

nally 

Ually 

Dally 

Except Sunday. . . 



Leave 
Duluth 



6 30 am 

7 36 am 

8 65 am 
10 W) am 
1136 am 

1 10 pm 

2 15 pm 

8 25 pm 
330 pm 
4 00 pm 
4 35 pm 
6 40 pm 

6 46 pm 

7 15 pm 

9 2&pm 
11 10 pm 



Leave 
W. Sup'r 



U 45 am 
7 K) am 
9 10 am 

10 15 am 
1160 am 

128 pm 

2 30 pm 

3 40 pm 

3 46 pm 

4 15 pm 

4 50 pm 

5 56 pm 
7 00 pm 
7 30 pm 
9 46 pm 

11 27 pm 



Arrive 
Superior 



t! 62 am 

8 02 am 

9 17 am 

10 22 am 

11 67 am 

1 35 pm 

2 37 pm 

3 47 pm 

4 25 pm 
4 67 pm 
(!02 pm 
7 07 pm 



115.3 pm 



StrPKRIOR TO DDTiCTH. 



Leave Leave ] 
Superior W. Sup'r! 



Dally 

Except Sunday... 

Dally 

Except Sunday... 
Except Sunday. .. 

Dally 

Daily 

Dailv 

Except Sunday. .. 

Daily 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday. .. 

Daily 

Except Sunday. . . 



33 am' 7 



8 10 am' 

9 26 am 
10 4-") am 
llU5am 
12 3&pm 

1 45 pm 
260 pm 
4 05pmj 
6 06 pm. 



610 pm 

7 20 pm 

1146pml 



6 45 am 
07 am 

7 40 am 

8 17 am 

9 32 am 

10 55 am 

11 16 am 

12 42 pm 
1 52 pm 

3 00 pm 

4 16 pm 
512 pm 
610 pm 

6 17 pm 

7 30 pm 
1152 pm 




Will continie Fifteen Da} s— until stock is re- 
duced. Cos:; or worth cuts no figure. WE 
MUST RE:DUCE, even at a great loss. 
Our low prices have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Busimjss Existence." Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock; besides 
you would not stop to read them, but will quote 
a few to givt; you an idea. 

$7.49 buys an elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at lea:jt $ I 5. 

$9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at lea:>t $ I 8. 

The same reductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear. 
Furnishing CJoods. No reserve. We must reduce 
our stock at le^st $1 5,000 (thirty-five thousand 
dollars.) Mid weather leaves us overstocked 
and compels us to take the loss. Call and see 
our prices. 



M. S. BURROWS & CO. 



o 
q 

id 
t» 

(£ 
ui 

Q 
O 

o 

I- 

CO 

D 
CO 




1 

1 


' i 


1 

! 


1 




For Sale 



PORiy ACRES 



-IN THE- 



Arrive 
Duluth 

7 06 am 
7 23 am 

7 66 am 

8 36 am I 

9 4« am 

11 10 am 
U 30 am 

100 pm 

2 07 pm 

3 16 pm 

4 30 pm 
6 30 pm 
6 26 pm 

6 35 pm 

7 45 pn. 

12 10 am 



St. Paul * Duluth Short Line. 

Duluth to West 

Superior •835+800 8 46 »10 30 M8 00 am 

Ouluth to West 

Superior •2 40 445*+630 •650*+1000pm 

West Superior 

to Duluth +»610 •7 56 9 30^+10 16 •1116 am 

West Superior 

to Duluth •2 00 +240 3 50 •5 45 •te 10 •g 10 pm 

•Daily. +WeRt Duluth only. 

Leave Duluth daily for Spirit Lake— 9:00 am, 
J^3U p m; returning at 10:05 am and pm. 



St. Paul ft Duluth Railroad. 



Leave Duluth... 
Arrive St. Paul.. 
Ar Minneapolis. 

Ar Stillwater 

Ar Milwaukee... 

Ar Chicago 

ArSt. Louis 

Ar K ansa s Olty. . 



05 I" 

Ban 



8 00 am 
2.10 pm 

2 nh pui 

3 30 pm 

4 15 am 
7 CO am 

5 05 pm 
4 45 pm 



r 
i" 

si 



210 pm 

6 66 pm 

7 "JO pm 
7 05 pm 
6 45 am 
9 30 am 
5 05 pm 
4 46 pm 



25 

: H 
: M 



looopm 

6 66 am 

7 15 am 

7 00 am 
+7 05 pm 
■+7 00 pm 

am 

8 45 am 



EAST END 



-AT A- 



Bargain. 



LOUIS LENA 



Formerly clerk with Chas. Schiller, at his old stand, 
West Superior street, has opened at 



26 



28 WEST SUPERIOR ST., 



With a complete stock of 




orted aod Domestic Cigars 



/ 



/ 




SMOKERS' ARTICLES, 



ifine Cot and Plug lobaccos, Etc. 



Sealed proposals will be received until 2 
o'clock p. m., January 30th, 1890, by B. R. Jef- 
ferson, chairman of committee on court house 
and county jail, for the cell work in the new 
county jail. In accordance with plans, specifi- 
cations drawn by O. G. Traphagren, architect, 
on file at the office of the county auditor. 

Bidders will specify what quality and 
-streujrth of chrame steel they propose to use, 
and submit sample of same. They will also 
submit drawing or samples of locks and bars 
they propose to use, and all mechanical de- 
vices connected with the cells. 

Ea<'h proposal must be accompanied with a 
check for five hundred dollars to be forfeited 
to St Ix>uis county. In the event that the pro- 
posal which said check accompanies 6hi.ll be 
accepted by the county commissioners, aud 
that the person making the proposal shall fail 
to comply with its terms 

Address all proposals to E. R. Jefferson, In 
care of county auditor, Duluth, Minn. For 
further Information apply to 

JOHH F. SCHLBCNXS, 

Superintendent, Duluth. Minn. 
The commissioners reserve the right to re- 
ject any and all proposals. 
Dec 14-18-21-24-2hJan 1-4-8-11-15-18-28. 



+Except Sunday— to other points dallr. 



V rthern Pacific Kailroad. 



Dining Cars on Pacific 
Express Trains. 



1 Leave Arrive 
Duluth Duluth 
Dally. Dally 



Pacific Express (limited) for 
Fargo, Helena, Butte, Ta- 
coma, Seattle and Portland, 
Grand Forks, Grafton, Win- 
nipeg 

Dakota Express, for Fergus 
Falls, Wahpeton, '"argo, 
Jamestown and Intermediate 
points 

Chicago Express, for Ashland, 
Milwaukee, Chicago and all 
Wisconsin Central and Mil- 
waukee, Lake Shore & West- 
ern points. 



3.30 pm 



7.15 pm 



4.00 pm 



6.26 pm 



7.65 am 



Terms - Very - Advantageous. 



10.30aiB 



NOTES 



tan 
street 



NQTICm STEAM PITKRS 



from the diary of tourists, com- 
mercial travelers, business 
men and others has revealed: 

That the Wisconsin Ckntrai. have the un 
qualified endorsement of all: 



Sealed proposals will be received until 2 
o'cUxjk p. m , January 3)th, 1890. by E. R. Jeffer- 
son, chairman of cominliteeon court house 
and county Jail, for the steam-heating appara- 
tus in the new county jail. In accordance with 
plans aud specitlcatioiis drawn by O. G. Tra- 
phagen, archiu-ct, on file at the office of the 
county auditor. 

Each proi>08al must be accompanied with a 
ccr1ifle<i check lor two hundred dollars, to be 
rorfeiled to St. L<jui8 County in the exent that 
the proposal which said chct^k accotn aniea 
shall t)e accepted by the county commissioners, 
and that the person making the proporui shall 
fail to comply with its terms. 

Address all proixjsals to E. R. Jefferson 
careof county auditor, Duluth, Minn. 

For further information apply to John F 
Schlenues, suiMTlnU'udent, Duluth, Minn 

The commissi. mers reserve the right to reject 
any and all proposals. 

Deo 14-18-2l-24-28Jan l-4-»-ll-15-18-22. 



in 



That the Wisconsin Centrai. has to-day the 
most popular line between Minneapolis, 
ST. Paul, DUI.DTH. Ashland and Milwao- 
KBE. and Chicago : 



That the n isconsin c'entral is dally w 
totts admlrerd as the recognized Pullman 
line between Minnaepolis, St. Padi-, Du 
LCTH, Ashland, and Milwauilee and Chi- 
CAOo: 

That the Wisconsin Central touches the 
most prtjminent points in Wisconsin, and 
and that it has more important busiu .ss cen- 
ters on its through line than any other rail- 
way In the Northwest: 



That the Wisconsin Ccntral has made envi- 
able reputation with Its peerless Dining Cab 
Service: 



That the Wisconsin Central runs fast trains 
on which all classes of passengers are carried 
with commodious and distinct accomodations 
for all: 



That the Wisconsin Central has representa- 
tives di.sirlbuted throughout the country, 
who will cheerfully give any information 
that may be desired and that its terminal 
Agents art) specially Instructed to look after 
the comfort of passengers who may be routr 
cd via its line. 

For detailed Information, apply to your near 
cs' lieaet Agint or to representatives of th 
road. 

8, R. AiNSLie, H. C. Bahlow 

General Manager. Genl. Traffic Manager. 
Louis Eckstein, Asst. Qenl. Passr. and T'kt 

Agt., Milwaukee. WU. 



All trains daily. Through sleeper Iron 
Duluth on Dakota exi>res8 leaving at 7:15 p 
m. Free Colonist Sleepers are run on Paclfi* 
Express leaving Duluth at 3:30 p. m. 

JNO. C. ROBINSON, 
Ticket Agent, Union Depot. 



Eastern Minnesota Railway. 

To St. Paul and Minneapolis. Buffet 
cars. Buffet sleeping cars. 

south BOtTND. 

Except Sunday. 

Leave Duluth xl3:20 p m 

Arrive Minneapolis 5:50 pm 

Arrive St Paul 6:20 p m 

Arrive Chicago 0:30 am 

Arrive St. Ixjuls 6:06 pm 

Arrive Kansas City.. 4:46 pm 
X Dinner served. 

north bound. 

Except Sunday. Dally. 

Leave St. Paul x4 :00 p m 10::50 p m 

Leave Minneapolis.... 4:20 pm 11:16 pm 

Arrive Duluth 10:00 pm 7:30 am 

I Supper served. 

Secure sleenlna- berths and tickets at Union 
ticket oftice. 402 West Superior street, or depot, 
corner Sixth ave. west and Michigan street. 



parlor 



Dally. 

10:45 p m 
6:40 am 
7:10 a m 

10:00 p m 
9:20 am 
8:46 am 



li^Acreage near the city 
limits at below market prices. 



ADDRESS 



Don't Forget the number, 




28 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



/ 



V, Gr., 



Careof Herald, Duluth. 



ONEOTA PARK! 



ON THE MARKET JAN. 15. 



This beautiful property lies just above Oneota, and is about three-quarters 
of a mile from Short Line depot. It is platted topographically; large sized 
lots, 33x125 feet; the view from it splendid; the prices are low, and the 
terms are the very best. So situated that all city improve nnents must enhance 
its values. < 



Call at Our Office and Examine Plat. 



& 



WEST DULUTH. 



DULUTH. 



LOUIS LENA.' 
PORTRAITS! 

FREE! FREE! FREE! 

A LIfE-SIZE PORTeHIT GIVEN M] WITH EVEB! PURCHASE 

OF $ I 5 OR OVER. 

(Commencing Monday, JAN. I 3, and continuing for a short 
time only, we will give away to every customer buying goods 
amounting to $ I 5 or over, a lite-size Portrait of himself or any 
other person whom he may wish, guaranteeing the work to be 
perfect in every respect, as samples in our window will prove. 
This in connection with our 

Red Figure Mark -Down Sale 




/ 

/ 




/ 



/ 




Giveij you more than all the profit, but, as in the past, we are 
BOUND to be FOREMOST and LIBERAL, always giving you 
the ElEST goods at the LOWEST prices, and something well 
wort 1 having to remember us by besides. 




^iwiJm 




WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



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5linn 



Ulstor 



•a\ Society 



t' 



.V 





ACRES 


Near 


Short Line Park on railroad. 


E. 


C. HOLLIDAY, 




326 IWest Superior Streot. 



DULUTH E VBNING HERALD. 




VOL. 7; NO. 242. 



DULUTH, MINN., VVEDJ^ESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1890. 



PiilCE THKEIE CENTS. 



rf 



Do you Want to BoFfow Mooey? 



\ We can let you have it and without delay. 

MONEY ON HAND 

Provided you have sufficient security. 



I 



Ouf Rates are the Lowest 




» '< t» a 



Applications for loans wanted at once in 

eULUIH. WEST DULUTH Ofi WEST SUPERIOR 



Improved or Unimproved Property taken. 



L.-_ 




URGE - OR - SIIULL - 

We have on hand $800, $ I 600 or $2400 

for a 

SNAP IN REAL ESTATE 

All cash. 



« <*—*^ 



Real Estate, Acfes aod Business Property a Specialty. 

Call and see what we have. 



h^ 



FIRE 



INSURANCE. 



i 



The best Foreign and American Companies rep- 
resented. Policies correctly written. 



1-^' 



k 



Stryker, Manley & Buck. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



< . 



LOUIS LENA 



Formerly clerk with Chas. Schiller, at his old stand, 26 
West Superior street, has opened at 



28 WEST SUPERIOR ST., 



With a complete stock of 



" I 




\mM aod Domestic Cigars 



SMOKERS' ARTICLES, 



Fine Cut aod Plug Tobaccos, Etc. 



Don't forget the number, 



28 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



*-r-. I 



In 



\ 



LOUIS LENA. 



LAST EDITIDN, 



m MILLS SHOT DDWK 



All but One of Minneapolis' 

Mills Close Because of 

Poor Trade. 



Cyclone Charlie Looks Out 

That That One is His 

Biggest. 



The Effect on the Imperial 

Here; Manager Church 

Talks. 



MiNNE.'U'OLJs, Jan. 15. — The St. Paul 
Globe says: The flour combine has 
played its trump card, and durint; the 
present week all the mills at the falls, 
with the exception of the Pillebury A, 
will shut down. Just bow long they 
will remain idle no one can tell, but it is 
admitted that the output of Hour in the 
United States will be materially re- 
duced in the next six months, and, con- 
sequently, higher prices will prevail. 
Just how extensive the combine is, and 
what mills outside of Minneapolis have 
entered into the agreement, is not 
known, but the recent trip made by C. 
A. Pillsbury to the East is said to have 
had considerable to do with the resolu- 
tion of the millers to curtail their flour 
output. 

The condition of the flour market has 
been anxiously noted by Minneapolis 
millers for the past few months. Owing 
to the low prices at which flour has 
ruled there has been practically little 
or no profit in milling, and yesterday the 
Columbia mill took initial steps in what 
is believed will be a general reduction of 
the output, ^f Ibte the supply has ex- 
ceeded the demand, and now local store- 
houses are full and Ihere is little or no 
demand for export. The Eastern and 
European markets hav« a large supply 
on hand, and naturally the price of flour 
iias declined. 

This state of aflFairs is viewed by the 
millers with alarm, and while some of 
them deny any knowledge of an agree- 
ment or combine, it is generally under 
stood that all the large mills in the 
country will shut down oefore the Ist of 
February, and that they will remain 
closed until such a time as they can dic- 
tate the price at which their products 
will be sold. 



THE IMPERIAL 



Mill /.'jt !4hnt Down, itad is in no Flour 
Combination. 

General Manager B. C. Church of the 
Duluth Imperial mill, was shown the 
above dispatch. Said he: "We have no 
intention of closing our mill, though the 
state of the flour market at present 
would almost justify us in doing it. I 
don't wonder that these Minneapolis 
fellows are closing for a while, eis the 
trade is generally demoralized, and the 
state of th»ir water power would be an 
inducement to close. I do not doubt 
that this will be beneficial to the flour 
market in general, but it's rather a 

strong dose of medicine. 

"As to a trust or combination of all 
the larger mills in the country, I have 
heard nothing of it," and Mr. Church 
spoke as though he did not believe there 
was such a thing. "If there was I 
should have likely heard of it, especially 
as the Imperial is the largest mill built 
in 1889. No, we shall not shut down at 
aU." 



A BIG DEFICIT. 



A. Sensation Promixetl in ttae AfTairs of 
Yoans Men'it Club 

Minneapolis, Jan. 15. — [Special.]— A 
gentleman now in the city, who is on the 
inside in national republican politics, 
says that a deficit of $12,000 has been 
discovered in the funds of the National 
Lieague of republican clubs. He says 
that a receiver has been asked for and 
that very sensational developments are 
inevitable. 



The Prassian Piet. 



Beklin, Jan. 15. — The Prussian diet 
was opened today. In his speech at the 
opening of the session William said it 
afforded the emperor-king much pleas- 
ure to state that the relations with Ger- 
many were good in every quarter. The 
speech was chiefly devoted to matters of 
international reform; the income tax, 
acquirement of private railways, and the 
tstablishment of lease-hold States for 
small farmers. The emperor also ex- 
pressed the hope that lasting peace 
would be established between the own- 
ers and their employes. 

Enslixh Train Kobbery. 
London, Jan. 15. — An extensive rob- 
bery of Turkish priorty bonds and Mexi 
can National bank shares has occurred. 
The securities were stolen while in tran- 
sit from Paris to Liondon, and probably 
on this side the Channel. 



FOREI GN AF FAIRS. 

Still the War Spirit; Uon Carloti Plota for 
an I' prising. 

Lisbon, Jan. 15. — This morning the 
police arrested seventy persons who were 
parading the streets and shouting: 
"Down with England." 

Pabi-s, Jan. 15. — Intelligence has been 
received here that Don Carlos, the 
Spanish pretender, who is now at Gratz, 
Austria, is plotting an uprising in 
Spain. 

Gkatz, Jan. 15. -Don Carlos has had 
an interview with his brother, Don 
Alfonso, in this city, for the purpose of 
settling upon a policy to be followed in 
the event of the death of the little King 
of Spain. 

Two Black Beam. 

Bell, the butcher, has two 3-year-old 
black bears in front of his establishment. 
They were secured by hina- two years 
ago, and have been kept at the slaughter 
house since, and were killed yesterday. 
They are very fat, and their black coats 
are very glossy. 



I can sell a few choice properties on 
Central and Grand avenues on small cash 
payments to good parties. 

John D. Gill., 
QT«r Postoflioe, Duluth. 



NO HI PPODR OME. 

The Fight between Myers and Glliuore to 
Taltf Plare Tonight. 

Chicago, Jan. l.j. -The sporting men 
from half a dozen states are here today 
for the purpoee of witnessing the glove 
contest between Billy Myers, the light 
weight champion of the world, and 
Harry Gilmore, ex-holder of the title; 
and the affair which takes place in Bat- 
tery D tonight promises to bring out the 
largest crowd that has participated in a 
sporting event for many years. Both 
men have met twice before and each 
time the Canadian has been defeated; 
the first time in a battle that lasted five 
rounds and the next in a fighl that lasted 
but one-third of one. Gilmore is smart- 
ing under his two defeats and proposes 
to do his best, while the bitter feeling 
that exists Ijetween the two men pre- 
cludes any possibility of a liippodrome. 
Small gloves will be used and eight 
rounds are to be fought, wliioh means 
that one or another of the contestants 
will be prostrate on the flo<r before a 
decision is rendere<l. 



For Taliiug Part in a r'ight. 

New Yokk, Jan. 15.— The "ullowing ar- 
rested for participation in the Sullivan - 
Kilrain fight at Richburg, Miss., were 
brought before the (Hstr. ^* ♦t.orney to- 
day. William Harding, Jim Waiibiey, 
William Muldoon, Mike t)onovan and 
Mike Cleary. Inspector Byrnes re- 
ceived extradition papers from Albany 
this morning. The party were after 
wards brought before liecorder Smythe 
to argue the question of admittanoe to 
bail. Pending agreement on the ques- 
tion the men were taken back to police 
heaadquarters. 

The Colored Piigillitt KetnrntT 
London, Jan. 15. — Peter Jackson and 
Charles E. (Parson) Davies of Chicago, 
sailed for home today. Both have well- 
filled purses and presents ad galore to 
remind them of the successful intro- 
duction of the colored pugilist to English 
"society.'' 

The .Stakes Closed. 
Memphis, Tenn., Jan. 15. The stakes 
of the spring meeting of the Memphis 
.Jockey club, which opens in April, were 
closed today. The entries are more 
numerous than ever hfcfore, and over 500 
horses will be quartered at the Park by 
March. El Itio liey and Spokane will 
be among the starters. 

BADLY BROK EN UP. 

The Croitiii Trio, Kspeciuily Cuuglilin. 
Realize tlie Last Hope Is Gone. 

Joliet, 111., Jan. 15. -When theCronin 
prisoners. Coughlin, Burke and O'Sul- 
livan arrived at the penitentiary last 
night, they all tried to brace up and 
make a strong effort to keep from show- 
ing signs of weakness. They managed 
to succeed very well, except Coughlin, 
who when spoken to could not reply, 
but finally managed to stammer out. 

"Boys, don't talk to me: I am all broke 
up." 

Deputy Speers said he never saw a 
man so affected as Coughlin, and when 
the Chicago otticers bade them good bye, 
Burke and O'Sullivan managed to stam- 
mer out an almost inaudible reply, but 
Coughlin was silent. 

.\ correspondent tried to talk to them 
all, but Coughlin said: "Please do not 
talk to Die." O'Sullivan said: "lean 
not speak tonig'.it," and Burke said, 
without any visible signs of emotion: 
'•V.'ell, we are in for it and must take 
our medicine, but it is not over with ns 
yet." 

SIOUX CIT Y & NORTHERN. 

A New Outlet to the N«rlliwe»t Furnished 
.Sioux City. 

Sioux City, Iowa, Jan. 15. — .\t noon 
today the tracklayers of the Sioux City 
& Northern railroad reached this city. 
The contract for the road, which is 
ninety-eight miles long, was let July 17 
and work was begun July 24. • All the 
depots, side tracks, tanks, stock yards, 
etc., necessary for the operation of the 
line are completed except at this point. 
The road extends to Garretson, S. D., 
where connection is made with the 
Sioux Falls branch of the Manitoba and 
Feb. 1 connection will be made by reg- 
ular trains with trains on that road. 
This gives Sioux City a new outlet to 
Duluth. The road has been built and is 
owned by Sioux City men. 

That Consolidation. 
Minneapolis, Minn., Jan. 15. — It is 
anuounced here that Charles L. Colby, 
president of the Wisconsin Central, has 
been elected president of the St. Paul ,Jc 
Northern Pacific. This is the portion of 
the Northern Pacific from St. Paul to 
Brainerd, and the election is said to be 
another step towards the consolidation 
of the Wisconsin Central and the North- 
ern Pacific. 



Bufl'alo Insurance .Hen OI>Je<-t. 
Buffalo, Jan. 15. — Whether the In- 
land Lloyd's headquarters shall be trans- 
ferred to Chicago will tie decided at a 
meeting of the managers to be held here 
this afternoon. Local insurance men 
are greatly excited over Chicago's effort 
to obtain the headquarters and the pub- 
lication of The liegister in that city, And 
will make a vigorous resistance. The 
probabilities are, however, that the re- 
moval will be decided upon. 

'Twas Fiction. 

Ottawa, Ont., Jan. 15.— The minister 
of justice says that the story telegraphed 
from Ottawa regarding the Dofninion 
government having just received from 
Lord Salisbury a copy of the proposed 
extradition treaty with the United 
States, and outlining the text of offenses 
in the treaty, is a piece of fiction 
throughout. 

.Big Britlsli Bankers Burst. 

London, Jan. 15. - Artola Bros., for- 
eign bankers, with houses in London, 
Paris and Madrid, have been declared 
bankrupts. Liabilities, £iOO,000. 

Victim of Grip. 

Boston, Jan. 15.— Chas. B. Danforth, 
for over twenty-five y^rs city editor of 
Boston Herald, died of pneumonia this 
morning, aged 47. 

TELEGRAPH BRIEFS. 



A farmer's wife at May ville, Dak., hav- 
ing learned that the proceeds of a mort- 
gage on her husband's farm had gone to 
defray a whiskey bill at a blind pig, col- 
lected beven more women and they sal- 
lied forth. Before noon they had broken 
upseveral blind pigs and utterly destroy- 
ed their fixtures and furniture. The pro- 
prietors offereil but feeble resistance. 

Carter W. Damar, a prominent and 
wealthy citizen of Lexington, Ky., has 
just overhauled his daughter Nina, who 
eloped from a Chicago Michigan avenue 
mansion last Friday. He found her at 
the Windsor, St. Paul, married. 

William H. Schmidt &, Co., extensive 
sash and door manufacturers of Mil- 
waukee, who made an assignment, have 
aasets of $188,000 and liabilities of 1112,- 
000. Every creditor is promised dollar 
tor dollar. 

The high school building at Colorado 
Springs burned last night. Loss about 
830,000, insurance *1],000. Cauae of fire 
unknown. 



HFFAIRS OF POLITICS. 



Windom Silver Bill Introduces 

Next Week; Regard to 

Brazil. 



The Tariff; Deadlock in Iowa; 

They Formally Name 

Brice. 



Wa.shinoton, Jan. 15.- The house 
committee on coinage, weights and 
measures called upon Secretary W^indom 
this morning and discussed informally 
the question of silver cj^inage. The sec- 
retary informed the committee that he 
was preparing a bill on that subject, em- 
bodying the features of the plan out- 
lined iu his annual report, which he ex- 
pected to have ready for submission to 
congress next Monday. It is understood 
that Mr. Conger of Iowa, will introduce 
the bill in the house. 

The senate to<lay t<x)k up Mr. Mor- 
gan's resolution recognizing the United 
States of Brazil, as a free, independent 
and sovereign state: and Mr. Turpie pro- 
ceeded to make a speech in support of it. 

A Philadelphia manufacturer of sur- 
gical instruments was the first witness 
before the ways and means committee 
this morning. He advocated the im- 
position of a duty of iO per cent on 
catheters and bouges. 

Bernard Baron, a cigar manufacturer 
of Baltimore, advocated the entire aboli- 
tion of the internal revenue tax so far as 
it pertains to cigars and tobacco. He 
considered it unjust to raise duty on 
Sumatra tobacco. If congress protected 
the farmer by placing a duty of fifty 
cents on Sumatra tobacco, it was all he 
could demand. Why should he be more 
protected than the farmer who raises 
vegetables? 

Nortli westerns (»ick. 
The Minneap<jlis Journal's Washing- 
ton special says: Congressional repre- 
sentatives from Northwestern states 
liave nearly all had severe tussles with 
the grip. It is the fashion in Washing- 
ton to let the strange malady toy with 
you. Some of the Northwestern petiple 
have been dangerously ill. Congress- 
man llinider was about the first to suc- 
cumb. He was in bed a couple of weeks, 
and although he has l>een attending to 
his duties for the past ten diiys, he kas 
by no means been well. About the 
time that he arose from his sick bed 
Mrs. Snider became a victim. She has 
been dangerously ill at times, but is now 
considered out of danger. Congressman 
Hansbrough of North Dakota had a 
severe siege. He was confined to his 
apartments for nearly two weeks. He is 
still weak. Senator Washburn had a 
slight attack of the influenza, but has 
not yet taken to his bed. 

Deadlock in Iowa, 

Dfjj MoiNr.s, .Tan. I.5.- The senate 
held a short session this morning. .\ 
number of resolutions were introduced 
providing for the appointment of com- 
mitlees on mileage, bouse organization, 
inaugural, journal, etc. The senate then 
adjourned till 2 p. m. tomorrow. 

In the house filibustering was the 
first thing in order. The number of 
sick republicans increased during the 
night, and this morning three were al- 
most disabled. After filibustering for 
half an hour the first roll call took 
place, the vote resulting 50 to 50. After 
taking another ballot it. was apparent 
nothing could be done to break the 
deadlock. A resolution was adopted 
provided for pairing. The house then 
adjourned till 10 o'clock tomorrow 
morning. 

To Klect a tiovernor. 

Charlf-ston, W. Va., Jan. Ii5.— The 
legislature has convened to decide the 
gubernatorial contest.'* Judge Fleming 
and (Jeneral Goff are both here and de- 
cline to be interviewed, and both seem 
hopeful. Three republican senators and 
one representative are absent on account 
of sickness, and two democratic mem- 
bers have not arrived, leaving a demo- 
cratic majority of three on a joint ballot, 
but the democrats are not disposed to 
push the matter. No definite plan of 
action has been decided upon. The gen- 
eral impression is that the session will 
result in the seating of Fleming. 

Result of Klection Frauds. 

Washington, Jan. 15. — Attorney -Gen- 
eral Miller will today examine the bill 
prepared by the United States district 
attorney at St. Louis; in relation to the 
naturalization of aliens and which it is 
proposed to introduce into the llouse 
without delay. The bill has grown out 
of the election frauds litigation in that 
city traceable to defects in the present 
laws, and is intende<I to prevent a repe- 
tition of euch frauds in the future. Its 
provisions have not yet been made pub- 
lic. 

Maryland's Senator. 

Annapolis, Md.. Jan. 14.— The senate 
and house met in joint session today and 
re-elected Ephraim K. Wilson, (dera.) 
United States senator for the term of 
six years beginning March 4, 1891. Rep- 
resentative members cast their votes for 
Hon. Thos. I). Hodson of Somerset 
county. Mr. Wilson is the particular 
representative of the Eastern share in 
the upper house of congress, a peculiar 
state law requiring that one of the two 
United States senators shall be an East- 
ern shore man. 



The Poi>e on Politics. 

Rome, Jan. 15. — The pope has issued 
ao encyclical which sets forth the prin- 
ciples which shall guide Catholics in 
their relations toward the state, which, 
the encyclical says, they must obey 
when such a course does not entail dis- 
oljedience to divine law. In countries 
where the state opposes Roman Catho- 
licism, Catholics must combat the 
enemy, but must not tie the church to 
any political party. 

Brice Formally. 

Columbus, Ohio, Jan. 15. —The house 
and senate met in joint session today at 
noon and formally declared Calvin S. 
Brice elected to the United States 
senate. Brice made a brief speech of 
acknowledgment, and was presented to 
the members in person. The result was 
declared among much enthusiam. The 
hall was crowded, many ladies being 
present, among them Mrs. Brice. 

Young Blaine Has it Bad. 
Washington, Jan. 15.— Walker Blaine, 
solicitor of state department, is reported 
to be seriously ill this morning. He took 
a severe cold several days ago, and it has 
developed into pneumonia. His family 
and friends are very much alarmed at 
his condition. 

The Dally Grist. 

Washington, Jan. 15.— The President 
today sent to the senate the following 



appointments: Postmasters, John B 
Harlow, St. Louis; William H. Whelan, 
Dead wood, S. D. 



A Fine Minneapolis Kesldeoce Burned. 

MiNNKAPOns, Jan. 15. — [Special.]- An- 
other large tire occurred in Minneapolis 
early this morning. The tine large stone 
residence of attorney A. M. Merrick at 
the corner of Nicollect avenue and Nine- 
teenth street was almost completely des- 
troyed. The building was erected in 
1873 by R. J. Mendenhall at a cost of 
8GO,0(X). It was at that time considered 
the most beautiful residence in the city. 
The finishings were oriental and of a 
most artistic character. The Merricks 
valuable library was nearly a total loss. 
The books which were saved were seri- 
ously damaged by smoke and tire. The 
building was insured for 810,000. 

THAT POLI TICAL MEETING. 

Was it Called in Mr. Hall's Interest?— Not 
According to Testimony. 

The Scandinavian political meeting 
held Monday night seems to have stirred 
a certain morning publication to an 
alarming extent, and the paper referred 
to is in the wrong. The meeting was an 
informal one, called principally by M. 
Wesenberg who is not noted for the 
brotherly love he be-irs M. O. Hall. The 
following from the chairman of the 
meeting seems to gently hint that the 
morning paper is mistaken: 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

When The News this morning tells us 
that the meeting in No. 730 East Third 
street, Monday night was called in the 
interest of Mr. M. O. Hall, it is very 
much mistaken. As one of those who 
called, and as the chairman of the meet- 
ing, I can state that it was held to tind 
out who would be the right man to sup- 
port for mayor at the next city election. 
Shaw, Hall and Swanstrom were talked 
about, and the two last ones had a hard 
opposition. Hans Wahl, Chairman. 

Duluth, Jan. 15, 1890. 

More than twenty prominent Scandi- 
navians have called on The Herald to- 
day with requests for correction, and in 
justice to them The Herald gives the 
facts. Mr. Johnson, of Bredeson & John- 
son, said, "The marning paper is alto- 
gether wrong. The meeting was called 
in no man s interest unless Wesenberg 
tried to pack it to suit his ideas, and if 
he did he failed, because M. O. Hall had 
more supporters than any other man 
mentioned. The question of support 
was brought up and I was opposed to 
pletlginjr to anyone before we knew who 
the candidates were. No one has an- 
nounced himself yet as in the tield. We 
had more of a discussion over the 
outrageous contract system of labor, 
than anything else, but I did not say 
that we must refuse our support to any- 
one who would not pledge himself to 
abolish it, because that is beyond one 
man's power. The contract system 
must be done away with. There were 
about thirty eight people present." 

Editor A. B. Lange of The Scandia, 
was a caller at The Herald office and got 
up from a sick bed to make the trip. He 
was present at the meeting and said: "I 
can't understand what the paper means 
by letting Wesenberg stuff it like that. 
The report is all wrong e.xcept that a 
meeting was held. I don't know where 
it got the idea, unless from Wesenberg, 
that Steneon is such a red hot supporter 
of M. O. Hall. He didn't say as much 
in Hall's favor as others. The meeting 
was just a free informal talk about elec- 
tion matters and the probable candi- 
dates, and no one was endorsed and no 
one was sat down upon. There was no 
action taken, as it was too early, and 
the meeting was not large enough to 
dictate, as there were only about thirty- 
five or forty there." 

Sheriff Sharvy, who is himself a Scan- 
dinavian, says of it: "That report of 
the Scandinavian meeting this morning 
was all wrong; it seems strange they 
should misrepresent everything about it. 
Somebody must have given them a 
wrong report." 

Local But Bad. 

The little blizzard which arrived last 
night is an entirely local affair, being 
confined to Duluth and the immediate 
vicinity. The thermometer at the mini- 
mum indicated only one below zero. In 
the Northwest the cold is intense, but 
no wind storms. There is considerable 
drift ice in the lake but very little 
formed. 



When Her Back Was Turned. 

Cincinnati, Jan. 15. — John Baas of 
Hamilton, Ohio, shot himself in his bed- 
room in the presence of his wife, but 
while her back was toward him. He had 
been in the woodshed with his pistol 
looking for thieves, and being a nervous 
man, some of his- friends think the shot 
was accidental. But he was standing 
before a mirror and the ball entered his 
right temple, and besides he had been 
somewhat despondent recently. He was 
G4 years old. 

Another Kentucky Plague. 

FoRDsviLLF, Ky., Jan. 15. — The 
black measles is raging here in epidemic 
form. Mrs. Mitchell and two children 
have died, and Mr. 'Mitchell is in a criti- 
cal condition. Over 100 cases are re- 
ported in t his neighborhood. 

. Kine Men Missinc:. 

GLOUCE.STER, Mass., June 15. — .\ tele- 
gram from Barrington, N. S., reports the 
schooner Ben Hur, owned by .Tames G. 
Farr &, Brother, this city, wrecked at 
Blanche Point, N. S. Nine of her com- 
plement are missing, including Captain 
Thornburn. 



8tandanl Beaten Again. 
TeLEDo. Jan. 15.-^The suit brought by 
the Natural Gas company (really the 
Standard Oil company) to prevent the 
city from issuing $750,t)00 w orth of bonds 
in order to pipe its own gas, has gone in 
favor of the city. The proceecings were 
declared lawful aad constitutional. 

Greece Shakes, 

Vienna, Jan. 15. -Several earthquake 
shocks were felt in Corinthia last night. 
The movement was from southeast to 
northwest. A performance was given at 
the theater when the shocks were felt. 
A false alarm of fire was raised at the 
same time, and the audience became 
panic-stricken and fled. No one was 
hurt. 



Wants 'Em to Settle. 
Frederic Prentice, the claimant of the 
undivided one-half of the Third division, 
hereby gives public notice by advertise- 
ment that he will be at The Spalding for 
two or three days, prior to leaving for 
New Vork, where any party wishing to 
see him on business connected with the 
property, or desiring to effect a settle- 
nnent, can do bo. Mr. Prentice says he 
is lead to make this announcement from 
the fact that such men as Messrs. Men- 
denhall, Miller, Harrington, Peyton, 
Macfarlane, Spencer, Forbes, Upham, 
Williams, and a number of other leading 
citizens have settled, and several others 
are arranging to do bo. It was at their 
suggestion that Mr. Prentice returned 
here again before going East. The case 
which is to decide the matter will come 
up in the United States court at St. Paul 
soon. 



LOOKINGilPSHIPBUILOING 



The Special Agent of the 

Census Visits Duluth 

Shipyards. 



An Intere.stine: Talk on the 

Industry Shows Its 

Growth, 



The Steel \'essels of the Great 

Lakeii and of the 

Ocean. 



Charles H I aft, to whom has been en" 
trusted the i;athering of information 
relative to the shipbuilding industry of 
the United S .ates for the next census 
report, arrived iu the city this morning, 
Mr. Taft's vie it here is to learn some- 
thing regarding Capt. McDougall's won- 
derful boats, t leir method of construc- 
tion, etc. 

"I started out last October on Luke 
Ontario" said Mr. Taft to a Herald re- 
porter who called on him, "to gather 
particular information about this branch 
of manufactorif, to be used in the United 
States censue report. I have visited 
most of the lake cities in 
which there are ship yards, and I 
find them to l)e in the midst of a won 
derful buildinit activity. All the com- 
panies have al they can do, and many 
have orders that they will not be able 
to fill in a lone time. 

"I am only I laking inquiries as to the 
general business, the methoiis of con- 
struction, materials used, plans changed 
or improved, etc. I had understood that 
wood material was decreasing iu quan- 
tity but, wh le greater distance is 
traveled in jetting oak, etc., yet there 
seems to be wood enough to last many 
years yet, thoi gh ultimately steel will 
take the place of wood in shipbuilding. 
Oak is a coiitly material, and is little 
used in Atlantic seaboard shipbuilding. 
"In Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit and 
Bay Ci^y the threat yards are turning 
out some magnificent boats. At Cleve- 
land half a do::en steel vessels are being 
built, and they make a magnificent 
sight as they stand on the stocks, all of 
them exceeding 30l) feet over all. Six 
more are ordei ed. At Bay City I found 
the yards runt ing at full capacity. One 
boat is being built for sea service al this 
point. It will differ in many respects 
from other vessels of its class. The ma- 
chinery will bo placed so that her center 
of gravity will turn midway 
when she is light. At De- 
troit a s])leiidid composite ship is 
being put together by the Detroit Dry 
Dock company. In this boat the frame 
will be of ttcel, the planking and ceiling 
of oak. The netal will be covered with 
wood. Invefselsof this class there is 
much less liability of the boat going to 
pieces if she goes on rocks, as the oak 
would chafe where steel would break. 

"Steel seemi to be the coming material, 
and many st<iel boats are being built, 
most of them for the coast and lake 
trade. The McDougall boats have 
created a gre it sensation among boat 
builders, man; of whom seem to think 
that they will not prove successful. The 
methods of bjilding have not changed 
much, that is, on the lines of the vessel. 
Boats are bu It now for speed or for 
bulk, but in this the question of ability 
to get through the water has to be con- 
sidered. As long as material ex sts 
wooden vesseh will be built, but only for 
coast and lake trade, for steel is needed 
to plough the ocean. 

"Two or three years ago a won- 
derful activity sprang up in 
the shipbuilding industry, and 
the activity hiis increased and is now m- 
creesiug. Th s has been caused by the 
remarkable increase in our great lake 
and Atlantic coast trade. Nothing sur- 
prised me so Eiuch as the enormous ton 
nage of the great lakes for the past two 
years. And the Atlantic coast trade 
shows fully ).8 large an increase. The 
Atlantic yards have launched some of 
the largest wcoden ships in the american 
commercial lervice, and more are in 
process of o< instruction. Ocean rates 
have advance< I in the last two years, and 
the coast and deep-sea trade has conse- 
quently advat ced. The price of mate- 
rial althrougl the djiataace of carrying 
has increased, has not materially changed 
shipbuilding on the Pacific ct>ast has 
also been active, and trade is increasing. 
"While here I will look over the Mc 
Dougil yardii, and I think I will find 
there the moat interesting part of my 
experiences nith shipbuilding. From 
Duluth I will visit Lake Michigan, then 
go East. I w 11 afterwards make a tour 
of the navigable rivers and the Pacific 
coast. After I finish my labors with 
this phase of shipbuilding, blanks ivill 
be sent to the different companies, ask- 
ing them fo' statistics as to tonnage, 
etc." 

t mistake to supjKjse that 
n America is a feeble in- 
t we hold a nominal place 
ritime nations of the world, 
rs have sarcastically rpfer 
•ine service, and it ha« been 
t as a ship-building nation 
ates can show no recent 
On the contrary, so pes- 
we have hardly a ship 
seagoing and worthy of 
pared with the vessels of 
or other European coun- 
ese statements are false, 
is one of the great indus- 
•untry, and there is now in 
sonstruction, and ordered, 
on nage. 



CITY BRIEFS. 



"It is a gres 
shipbuilding i 
dustry, or tha 
among the mu 
Our newspajx 
red to our ma 
reiterated tha 
the United Si 
achievements 
siniists claim, 
afloat that is 
mention, com 
Great Britain 
tries. But th 
Ship building 
tries of this & 
the course of i 
an enormous 



The Duluth Knights of Pythias have 
been invited to attend memorial servicee 
at Superior tomorrow evening in honor 
of the founder of the order, the late J. 
H. Rathburn. A large delegation will 
attend from here. 

The Highland Improvement company 
held its first annual meeting yesterday 
afternoon, and re-elected directors and 
officers. 

A new telephone has been put in the 
box office of Temple Opera. It is num- 
bered cJt<3. Tickets may now be order^ 
by telephone. 

The mill of Sanborn & Prentice at 
Sanborn, Wis., on the Zenith City Short 
line, began sawing in November and is 
now running day and night. "The entire 
stock of twelve million feet, has been 
purchased by the Bowdon & Murray 
lumber company of Minneapolis. San- 
born Jt Prentice are constantly improv- 
ing their plant and are now addinc 
shingle and lath mills. 

One of the mules on a street car last 
night on Bench street slipped and fell 
into a hole left open beside the track by 
the Water works company. The mnle 
was extricated after considerable exer- 
tion, and rewarded the labor of its res- 
cuer by biting a piece out of the calf of 
his leg. 

Carl Thiel, the photographer, has en- 
larged his qr.artersin the Ingalls build- 
ing and now has the largost photo- 
graphic printing room in the Northwest 
outside the Twin cities. 

It is not now considered probable that 
Col. Dudley of the St. Paul A: Duluth, 
will recover from his serious illness at 
St. Paul. 

The fiscal year of the health depart 
ment does not end until April 1, but the 
record os births and deaths for the cal- 
endar year is completed. There were 
0(54 births and 350 deaths. 

Swen M. Johnson has obtained full 
citizenship paijere. 

A total of seventeen transfers in Ken- 
sington Place addition was filed this 
morning. The selling parties are Louisa 
B. Smith and husband, of Buffalo, N. Y., 
and sixteen of the transfers are to 
Charleston, South Carolina parties, and 
one to Savannah, Georgia. Kensington 
Place addition is in section li!, township 
50, range J 4, just beyond Arlington 
Place addition and has only been record- 
ed for !i short time. The principal own- 
ers are the L. B. Smith family, of Buf- 
falo, and the H. M. Backus family, of 
Duluth. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuoi com- 
pany's office. Hotel St. Louis: 12 m., 
■J above; 3 p. m.,7^ above; 6 p. m., 7° 
above; 10 p. m., 8 atxjve; h a. m., 2" 
above; t) a. m., 4 below; 12 m., 1 below; 
Maximum, 8 above. Minimum, 4 be- 
low. Daily range, 12 . 

The ^'oung Mens club has arranged 
for a parly at Ingalls hall Friday even- 
ing in honor of Miss Lottie Jones, a 
popular young lady, who will soon move 
to Dakota. A very pleasant time will 
probably be had. 

Edwin E. Johnson was up on the 
charge of abusive lan.;uage this morning 
preferred by Julius Janzig. The case 
went over till tomorrow morning. Wm. 
Doran was the only drunk and he paid a 
fine of ^. 

The receiver of the police telephone 
system has been replaced, after a re- 
moval of several days for repairs. Offi- 
cer Force sa' s the sjstem is working 
splendidly now. 

A reporters life is not always full of 
joy and romance. A paragrapher who 
does duty for the West End department 
of a morning paper, is realizing this. 
A few locals have been the cause of 
setting half a dozen people by the ears. 
And the whole outfit want the freeb 
young reporter's gore. Nothing less 
thau blood will satisfy them. It is said 
the localizer is keeping out of sight. 

.\ three-story brick block, 75 feet front, 
will be put up on Etist Michigan street 
near Lake avenue this spring. 

A great padlock is affixed to the front 
door of the J. F. Erickson drug store on 
East Superior street next to Jay W. 
Anderson's and the postponed sale did 
not come off, all on account of an injunc- 
tion issued out of the district court, and 
Sheriff Sharvy now holds the fort alone 
again. 

H. C. Yeager is steadily improving at 
St. Marys hospital, and unless any re- 
lapse occurs will be out before long. 
There are sixty-eight patients at St. 
Marys. 

The meeting of the Builders and 
Traders exchange arranged for last 
night did not take place, but was post- 
poned a few days. 

The lake shore is walled in with great 
mountains of ice, blown in by the re- 
cent storms. 



LOBSTER SALA D DID IT. 

Many Kuclld House Itoarders Knocked 
Out l>y the Deadly Lobster, 

The boarders of the Euclid organized 
a sleighing party Monday night and had 
a highly enjoyable ride for some hours. 
Upon their return they were provided 
with an elaborate lunch. The principal 
delicacy, and one freely partaken of, was 
lobster salad. 

In a few hours several of the party 
were taken violently ill with unmistake- 
able symptoms of poisoning. Doctors 
were called and prompt measures 
adopted for the relief of the suf- 
ferers. The worst afllicted were E. L. 
Whittington, Miss Milliams, C. E. Doll 
and Mrs. J. D. Moore. Several others 
were more or less affected. All are 
somewhat better this morning, and out 
of danger. .Vir. Whittington says it was 
the closest ca'l he ever had in bis life. 
The salad was made from canned lob- 
ster. 

To Keal Kstate Men. 

Ileal estate owners and all others 
operating in Superior real estate sub- 
scribe to "Robert G. McDowell's Atlas 
of the City of Superior." 

Robert McFarrf.ll, 
Subscription Agent, 
327 West Superior street, Duluth. 



REAL ESTATE 



Special Bargains I Snaps. 

3 Lets in Endlon, $4500. 

2 Lets in Highland Park, $2500. 
20 Acres in I 0-50- 1 4 at a bargain. 
63 Letts adjoining London, cheap. 



A few of the choicest lots in'Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale on ea!;y ternns. 

Twent/ acres on the hill at a great bargain. 



J. M. ROOT & CO., 



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Room 9, Metropolitan Block. 



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DCXtrri^ tVENING HERALD: JAOTTARY 15, 1890. 



biVi^SlXU 11 ait A LI). 



tLlOT LC-JJ, Pubhiher. 



PRICE, THREE CENTS— Subscription Rates: 

Onily, by mall, per year $7.00 

Dally, by mail, iier thre« months 2.00 

Dally, bj mall, pt-r .'uc month 76 

IN THK CITY. 

Dally, by carrier, per week 18 



Butert-d at the postoffioe at Uuluth, MIub.. a» 
■ec-oiid-c-lHsti mail uiatler. 

Id^Tut; vvasliiuglon office of The H»rald In 
»t li;i» New Voik avouue, N. W. wb.rethe 
papiT is kept ou Ble and where The Herald 
oorrf3iH)iidoat will welcome visitors Iroui the 
NorUi«rc?i. 



Charles E. Taft, the special United 
States (»asus a^eut for ascertaining the 
ConditiuQ of the shipbuilding industry 
of the country, is now in this city, and 
an interesting interview with him ap- 
pears in auoth<«r column. It is gratify- 
ing to have his assurance that our ship 
yanls both on the sea coast and the 
lakes are pressed with work, and thai 
the outlook for the industry is excellent. 
It is a big tuistuke, as he says, to assume 
that the United btates is not a great 
shipbuiidiug country, and nobody will 
honestly make tlie misLake who studies 
the present output. 



The Stevens resolution calling for the 
invesligcition of alleged railroad dis- 
criminations is the moving interest in 
North Dakota at present. In accord- 
ance with the resolution which passed 
t^e bouse on Saturday, the speaker has 
appoiuted a special committee of in- 
vestigation which will report the facts 
to the house. It is alleged that there is 
discrimination against points in North 
Dakota in favor of the Twin cities, and 
that the charges for transportation from 
a number of Dakota towns to points 
Sixty miles or less distant are as high as 
from St. Paul to the same points. When 
the committee reports we shall know 
better what foundation there is for this 
complaint. 



millions more bad been put up by the 
same Bnuerlein for the street railways, 
ti^e Alliance works and eyery big paying 
establishment in the city. The cutting 
edge of the joke was that so 
many gulliblecitizens swallowed it whole 
and kept the telephones on the jump all 
day with messages to the big brewers 
and others implicated in the yarn. 
Angry denials came at first in mass over 
the wires with ai»UBe of Der Herold, but 
in the course of the day, the city began 
to drop to the sell and good naturedly 
laugh at it. It was observed that Bauer- 
lein was the German for countryman, the 
Teutonic McGinty, so to speak, and tha* 
the object of the fake was to put an ex- 
tinguisher of ridicule on the current im- 
positions in the form of reported syndi- 
cate sales. Today Der Herold rubs in 
the joke with its news that "Mr. Bauer- 
lein" had just purchased the peanut 
stand on the corner of Broadway and 
Wisconsin street for $'2,000,000 cash and 
would soon control all the leading pea- 
nut stands in the city. The practical 
effect of the sell has been to boom Der 
Herold all over the city and make "Mr. 
Bnuerlein" a better known man than 
McGinty from one end of the town to 
the other. 



LITTLE 0HUNK3 OF NEWS. 



SEEN AND HEARD. 



The announcement in our Minneapolis 
dispatch today of the approaching shut- 
down of all the mills at the falls except 
the Piilabury A, shows that the money 
m n^illiLig at the Flour City at present is 
not enough to tempt the hunters of a 
dollar on this side of the Atlantic or the 
other. The object of the combined shut 
down is, of course, to avoid running at a 
loss by breaking down still farther an 
overstocked market, and the hope that 
the decrease in the supply will before 
long put up prices to a profitable point. 
Our Imperial will keep on running just 
the same, and we put little stock in the 
truth of the report that all the large 
mills m the country outside Minneapo- 
lis, or many of them, will shut down be- 
fore the 1st of February. Some may do 
8o, but this may be for individual rea- 
sons and in view of the state of the 
market, not because of a combination 
agreement. 



"Factories, factories, that's what you Duluth 
people want now," sild a stranger from Bo»' 
ton just arrived In the city. "And I'm jrlad to 
see that your men of push have this opinion 
too. Nevf-r mlud any more railroads, bend 
yourenergiee toward Inducing mills and manu- 
facturing establishments to locate. Doo'< 
offer any bonu^ies to railroa<Jd. tbey all want to 
come here. There's hardly a road west of Chi- 
cago that does not want Duluth t«rmlnals. 
The next ro.id you will have Is the Chicago, 
.Milwaukee & St. Paul. It's bound to come and 
nothing can stop It. In the meanllme you 
waul to get all the factories you can to come 
here. There's no better spot on earth for im- 
mense Industries ttiaa Duluth." 



Lake avenue resident: Upper Lake 
avenue is in a worse condition than ever; 
and the other avenues are equally 
bad. On some parts of the thorough- 
fare icy snow is piled in sharp ridges 
impossible to walk upon, so most people 
walk in the roads. The council will see 
that the walks are cleared of snow— next 
June. 

D. H. Merritt, president of the Iron 
Bay Co.: We are rapidly getting thini,:8 
in shape for opening the Iron Bay 
works. We are advertising for men, 
and expect another week will see us in 
active operation. 

Commodore Saxton: I think the idea 
of a historical society is a good one, am 
heartily in favor of it and will gladly 
give all help J can. 

S. F. Wadhams: Out of all the clerks 
in a big bank at Wilkesbarre, when I 
was there a few days ago, but two could 
work and they only three hours a day. 
Grip had the rest. 

John H. Harris: We have a remark- 
ably fine array of tennants in the Pal- 
ladio, an aggregation of capital and busi- 
ness push you don't often see. 

Clague & Prindle: The Insurance 
Journal furnished us by The Herald 
bindery is a tine piece of work and in 
every way satifefactory. We take pleas- 
ure in testifying to the excellent charac- 
ter of the work. It is tirst-claae in every 
respect. 

COMMENTS ON THE HERALD. 



PROMINENT PEOPLE. 

Mr. Michael C Hennebery, commer- 
cial editor of The Chicago Times for the 
last twenty years, died yesterday. 

John I. Blair, the millionaire of Hack- 



Dyspepsia. 

Makes the lives of many people miserable, 
ettstown, N. J., gave his private secre- I causing distress after eating, lour stomach. 



occasion 



Without giving out the usual text Dr. 
Farrar preacued a sermon on Robert 
Browning shortly after the poet's death. 
The omission has called out a flood of 
comment favorable and otherwise. We 
fail to see any sound reason why Dr. 
Farrar or ary other preacher should not 
be suffered to use his own discretion in 
the matter without interference. Cus- 
tom djes not hallow precedent in this or 
other like cases. It may be admitted, 
however, that he did not have the valid 
excuse tor disregarding precedent which 
was offered by a young Catholic preacher 
who lately delivered a sermon in Lon- 
don with a like omission. He was a 
Spaniard of remarkable eloquence, and 
spoke English, as some thought, quite us 
well as his own language. On the pres- 
ent occasion he hesitated for one 
short moment before beginning his 
sermon, and then, without giving a text, 
gave a stirring address. After the serv- 
ice some of bis brother priests, thinking 
that he had forgotten to read the text, 
smilingly mentioned the fact The 
preacher replied: "No, I had not for- 
gotten it. It was the verse in St. Luke, 
*No man having put his hand to the 
plough, and looking back, is fit for th* 
kingdom of God,' and when I was about 
to read it I found that I had forgotten 
whether The word plough was 
nounced 'piuff' or 'ploff.' " 



In connection with the trip over the Kastern 
road by a Herald representative to see the 
working of Priest's snow hanger, just a word 
ac> to the oouditioa of the track. I have had 
the misfortune to ride over many thousands 
><f miles of new road: have suffered much 
while being jolted over rough road lieds and 
uneven tracks. In Justice to th« Bastarn one 
uuu say that in a fifty mils ride In the cab of 
one of their superb iooomotlves— not the aasi- 
e:>t seat ou th« train by any means— and ruu- 
ning at a high rate of speed, there was po more 
perceptible jarring or shaking than experi- 
enced on a palace car of some of the new 
Nortbwesicrn roads. This was an agreeable 
surprise, and exhibits a splendid track for a 
rt^iad which has been In operation a year. And 
while on this subject It is an easy transitiou 
to conductors. If all the conductors on this 
line are as obliging, accommoda'lng and effi- 
cient as Conductor GlU>oy the company Is to be 
cougmtulated. 

* « * 
I met a New Yorker here the other day. We, 
as a m.itter o; course, were talking about the 
World's fair. He was surprised tbat Duluth 
should endorse Chicago. "I do not see," said 
he, "what Duluth has In comoson with Chi- 
cago, while I can see where this city would bo 
bcuctltted by hundreds of thousands of dollars 
if the fair is held ia New York. Chicago is Du- 
iuth'sociy ri\al. To New York and the East 
the West must look for a Iobr: time yet for 
money to put into manufactories, etc. A Du- 
luth exhibition at a New York fair 
would bring thousands In investaeui 
at the bead of tba lakes. Just as many 
poople would visit Duluth. wer» th« fair held 
ID New York, as If in Chicago. Another 
tbing-lhe success of a fair muat depend upon 
the population Immediately contiguous to the 
city in which it Is held. What Is virtually New 
York has 3,,'i(ju,i'uu Inhabitants, a number equal 
to two Chlcagos, St. Louis. Boston and Phila- 
delphia put together. Within a distance 
rvuchcd by the suburban trains of the city are 
<>,lM).UUO people, enough to make the fair a suc- 
cess did no others visit it. From the fair 
grouuas twelve street and other railways and 
many ferries and boat lines could distribute 
the :.i>i,uiiu people who will visit In an an hour's 
time, while at ttie best Chicago could only di{<- 
tribute oO.tXiO people an hour. New York's 
guarantee fund is made a line on the estates 
ot the subscribers, and over •5,«00,00O, besides 
iiO.iHw.wAi city bonds, can be used for fair pur- 
poses. Duluth should back New Tork in this 
matter." 

THE POLITICAL ONLOOKER. 



Marquette Mining Journal: The 
Journal gives its bright Duluth contem- 
porary. The Herald, credit for having 
been quick to see the force of what E. 
C. Potter aet forth in his article on the 
growth of iron and steel manufacturing 
in the West as applied to iron and steel 
industries in towns on J^iake Superior. 
Of course The Herald finds evidence 
that the place above all others where 
steel and iron can be manufactured is its 
own city, just as The Mining Journal in- 
sists that Marquette has advantages that 
uo other point on the lake can boast; but 
The Herald will be forgiven for its 
attempt to make capital for its city, in- 
asmuch as the argument it presents 
applies equally to every town on the 
lake. 

Red Wing Republican: The Duluth 
Herald takes pains to set the world 
right in regard to the advantage which 
Duluth has over St. Paul because of the 
cheaper price of coal. The Pioneer 
Prese concedes that manufacturers get 
their coal about f I.'Jo per ton cheaper at 
Duluth than at St. Paul. Then it lets 
"a prominent manufacturer" say that 
this difference is too small an item to 
consider. Now the world concludes 
either that manufacturers of St. Paul 
do not use much power or that St. Paul 
possesses advantage which offsets the 
dearness of coal, or thnt the "manufac- 
turer" did not tell the truth. 

Mankato Review: The freight charge 
on coal to St. Paul from Duluth is $1.2.5 
per ton. The same coal delivered at 
Mankato costs consumers about 92.5<1 
per ton — double the price for one-half 
greater distance. The mistake Lake 
Superior railroads make is allowing such 
discriminations. It builds up rival 
cities and drives the commerce of 
smaller cities, naturally tributary to Du- 
lutli, to Chicago. 

Minneapolis Journal: The Duluth 
Daily Herald tias recently greatly im- 
proved its news-getting facilities and in- 
tends to excel its already tine record. 

FROM MINNESOTA EDITOR*. 



tary a check for 8*20,000 on the 
of his recent marriage. 

Lieutenant William E. Whitfield, 
United States navy, died at St. Eliza- 
beths insane asylum yesterday, aged 37 
years. He entered the navy in 1870. 

Trotter, the colored recorder of deeds 
at Washington, has resigned. The 
office has paid in fees in less than three 
years $40,000. A bill is pending in con- 
gress to make the position a salaried 
one. 

Mr. .Rebisso's equestrian statue of 
Grant has been accepted by the Chi- 
cago citizens' committee. The pe lestal 
for it in Lincoln park, Chicago, ie nearly 
finished, and the dedication wiu take 
place sometime next summer. 

Senator Sherman has served continu- 
ously in congress since the thirty-fourth, 
except during tke time be was in the 
cabinet. Senator Morrill entered the 
house at the opening of the thirty-fourth 
congress, and has served ever since 
either as representative or senator. 

Mr. Jacob H. Schiff of New York has 
made Harvard university a g f t of 110,- 
000 for the purchase of a Semitic collec- 
tion. There is now no museum of this 
kind in the world. The collection will 
be made as soon as possible. A tem- 
porary home for it will be provided in 
the Peabody museum. 

Surgeon Charles B. Goldsborough, 
ITnited States marine hospital service, 
died at the marine hospital. New Or- 
leans, La., Sunday morning, 5th inst. 
Surgeon Goldsborough entered the ser- 
vice in 1877 as assistant surgeon, and 
was a most efficient otlicer. At the time 
of his death he was in command of the 
hospital at New Orleans. 

SPATE in MS. 



Bick headache, heartburn, loss of appetite, 

» faint, "all gone" feeling, bad taste, coated 

_ . tongue, and Iircgulmity of 

Distress the bowels. Dyspepsia does 

After '^^^ K*^^ ^'<^" <>' Itself. It 

— ^. requires caredil attention, 

baCing a„j a reraed] like Hood's 

Sarsaparllla, which acts gently, fet efflclently. 

It tones the stomach, regulates the diges- 

aon, creates a good ap- Siok 

petite, banishes headache, i i_ 

and refreshes the mind. H©aclache 

" I have been troubled with dyspepsia. I 

bad but little appetite, and wtiat I did eat 

|j___i_ distressed me, or did me 

K ""'® ^""'^- ^^^'' "^^'^S ^ 

DU rn would have a taint or tired, 

all-gone feeling, as though I had not eaten 

anything. My trouble was aggravated by 

my business, painting. Last efti,- 

spring I toolt Hood's Bar- wOUT 

saparllla, which did me an StOITiach 

Immense amount of good. It g.ivo me an 

appetite, and my food relished and satisfied 

the craving I had previously experienced." 

Georoe a. Page, Watertowu, Mass. 

Hood's Sarsaparllla 

Sold hjr all .IniKglstt. fl: lixforSS Prepared onry 
hy C. I , HOOD 4 CO., Apothe<-arl««,LowoU, Mass. 

lOO Doses One Dollar 



iwppy m MK 

The Season of Grand 
Resolves and Sol- 
emn Vows. 



The Southern Minnesota Horticul- 
tural society has elected the following 
officers for the ensuing year: President, 
A. W. Siae, Rochester; vice-president, 
J. S. Harris, La Crecent; secretary and 
treasurer, Way land Stedman, Rochester. 
The society now has forty irembers. 

The Minneapolis grocery story of L. 
Priedheim & Co., is closed. An assign- 
ment IS probable. 

The eight Demorest silver medal con- 
test was held at Anoka last evening, five 
young ladies participated. Two others 
were on the list but could not ap)>ear on 
account of the grip. Pearl Cooj>er re- 
ceived the pouular vote of the audience, 
but the medal was awarded to Jessie 
Davis. 

The parents of young Sav Martin of 
St. Cloud, who bad been a student at 
the normal school, are anxious to learn 
of his whereabouts. On Friday he was 
expelled, and was then refused admit- 
tance to the city school. He disappeared 
the next day. 



REAL ESTATE. 



SPECIAL LIST 



BARGAINS 



C. E. 



OFFEKED BV 

RICHARDSON. 



AllofWhich is Well in Its 

Way, but Practice is 

the Thina:. 



You Can All "Get There' 
You Try, so You ha • 
Better Try 



THE NIW 



•S LEAF. 



|Chic..*:o liLirtld.J 
.lust now is the lime vheii the uveragtj man 
Uegrliis to prf)S|;eetivp|y nientally plan. 
As the tuinual swourinif()tTsca.<(>i. draw.-; near 
Of the Icat hell turn over tin- llrt-t of tlie year" 
hverythiUKtliat Is wrong from his life he'll 

enaoo. 
And naught that's unjust in his thoughts have 

a place. 
He'8 hure he has powor all evil to shun 
\V hen he says so and so thou the business is 

done. 
But in onler to have his new plan broken In. 
He d better not tarry a dav lo l>ejriu. 
And tis iKjst he should not use tiie leaves too 

fast. 
Whv not employ this year the leaf turned for 

lasii' 




pro- 



Grovemor Campbell of Ohio in his in- 
augural message put in some words for 
cheap school books. He notes that Ohio 
builds schoolhouses, provides teachers 
and controls every detail of education, 
save the furnishing of books, and asks 
"Is there any ^und reason why it should 
not assume this function also? Recent 
experience in the state of Indiana shows 
that school booKs equal to those in use 
here are delivered to the children of 
that state at STj to oO per cent of their 
former cost. Other states have tried 
the experiment with apparent suc- 
cess. It seems to be an assured fact 
that school books can be furnished, 
either by direct publication of the state 
or by contract on behalf of the state, at 
less than present prices." We do not 
doubt it, and if the state assumes the 
charge of the education of its school 
children to the extent to which Ohio 
has gone, there is substantial reason 
and advantage in rounding out its pro- 
vision. But there are practical reasons 
for preferring that every city and town- 
ship should look after the education of 
its own children under a general state 
law requiring the attendance of chil- 
dren within the years of school age and 
suitable provision for them. The char- 
acter of the education and the text 
books can be varietl to advantage with 
different localities, and there is material 
objection to fitting children to the Pro- 
crustes bed of an uniform text book, not 
to speak of the chance that the book 
may be a syndicate imposition. 



Der Herold, the (ierman morning 
daily of Milwaukee, has been upsetting 
the calm of the cream city with its start- 
ling burlesque of the syndicate sales. It 
came out with a row of scare heads on 
its first page announcing that all the 
breweries in the city had been bought 
up by Joseph Bauerlein with a mammoth 
syndicate behind him. The price paid 



It Is amusing to iiote the variety of opinions 
on the same subject. A prominent city oIBclal 
«ivid laHt nurhi: "Party won't cut as much of 
a, figure in the city election u some people 
seem to ImaKioe. There are low of republi- 
cans in Duluth, who, if the party nominee is 
distatitefui to Ibem, wiil vote for the demo- 
cratic candidate. I have heard more than 
twenty goo<l staunch republicans express 
themselves to this effect. Caucuses are folug 
out of fashtuu," continued the same authority. 
•The people are not interested In them and do 
not turn out to vote as they do at an election 
This has nearly always been the ease. There 
is always more or less caucus-packlnr. and 
then the date of the caucus is (euerally sprung 
unexpectedly, with but short notice: couse- 
'lueully not more than half the voters know 
there has been a caucus until the thing is ail 
over and tbey read an account of it la The 
rlerald next day. The l)est man is going to be 
elected mayor this time, no matter whether he 
is republican, democrat, prohibitionist or 
laborlte." 

* « « 

Not half an hour afterward said another: 
"Party lines will lie drawa rerv cIoselT this 
election. This is a republican city, and we are 
going to elect a republican mayor, and a 
majority of the aidermea too. Ths party recog- 
nizes the importance of sticitlng together, and 
realize that In unity there is strength. There's 
goiax lo be some irood hard work put In for 
tbe party, and money won't be lacklnir either. 
The party is thorouyhiy orfranized, and success 
is ours. Of course we'll havs to work, but our 
mno is going In by a handsome majority. 
There is some talk about Douvhorty's being 
out of iheflifht." 

* * * 
"Shaw will be thw next mayor." This fell 

from the lips of a demoratic offlceht Ider. 
whoiie opinion always carries weight. "How 
do I knowy Well. the republicans 
are lukewarm. To tell the truth 
they haven't got a man up so far tbat will con- 
sent to run who stands a gbost of a show 
against our candidates. We're goinp: to draw 
largely from republican ranks; the democratic 
vote will be solid, and the majority of the 
labor party are with us." 

» ♦ * 
It la pretty evident that Dingwall and Beat- 
tie will sueceod themselves as aldermen In the 
First ward. In the Fourth ward Ix>nden will 
succeed himself, while in the Fifth Harry 
Armstrong will be returned. These seem 
sure now. As to the others there Is doubt. 



"Psycho," 

Citizea Train refuses to shake hands, 
alleging that it is a wanton waste of 
magnetism; but he is perfectly willing to 
kiss the other sex. This philoeophy of 
magnetic exchange smacks a little too 
much of the psycdo-logical. 

GattIng Her Foein i{«ady. 

He: I suppose you are very busy 
nowadays preparing your poem for com- 
mencement. She: Ob, yes, indeed. I've 
tried the waist on twice already. 



Mankato Free Press: In New York 
city the papers are kicking about "a 
green fungus" which is appearing on all 
the stone buildings. In this region it is 
a white covering on the sidewalks that 
is causing the greatest amount of 
worry. 

Wadena Tribune: Six families, all 
German, in the town of Waltham, are 
down with trichinosis. One is dead and 
thirty others are ill. It is feared that 
many of them will die. 

Elk River Star: One would think, to 
read the organs, that the only thing of 
consequence our senators and represen- 
tatives are sent to Washingtoa for is to 
wrangle over a few petty federal offices. 

Stillwater Gazette: Duluth applicants 
for the office of register and receiver of 
land are numerous. Col. Colville of the 
old First Minnesota now holds the 
former office, having Ween appointed by 
Cleveland. He is a democrat, but no 
braver or truer soldier ever lived. He 
was almost shot to pieces at Gettysburg. 

Not So Hlg After All. 
Ashland Press: In the report of the 
sale of lumber by the Superior Lumber 
conpany to Omaha in The Press, one 
cipher was added. It should have been 
8,tX)0,000 feet. 

A Future Great lodustry. 

Marquette Journal: Cablegrams from 
an agent who Lb now in Europe in the 
interest of the owners of the immense 
deposits of verde-antique marble near 
Ishpeming are most encouraging. He 
has visited almost every European 
quarry of that material and compared 
the product with his own. The com- 
parison is unfavorable to the European 
article. Michigan verde-antique is the 
finest in the world. As the deposit is 
also the largest, in a few years this coun- 
ty will dictate terms. 

They're Generally Considered So. 

Ashland News: Whatever may be 
said of Duluth, it cannot be denied that 
her citizens and newspaper men are 

hustlers. 

THOUGHTS ON THE LATE WAR. 



The Weather Bnlletin 




Heteorologlcal report received at Duluth 


Minn., 8 a. m. Jan 15. 1860. « 


PLAcas. 


Bar 

-JO.28 


Ther. 


wind 


Haln. 


Weather 


Duluth 


2 


NW 


.02 


Cloudy 


Pt. Arthur. 


■m:si 


—8 


N 


.08 


Snow 


Winnipeg: - . 


M <» 


-34 


Calm 




Cloudless 


at. Vlnrent 


ao.tu 


-34 


N 




Cloudlstts 


QAppelle. 
Asslnlb'ne 


ao.70 


-12 


NW 




Cloudy 


Helena 


30. M 


—8 


Calm 


.00 


Cloudless 


Huron. Dak 


M.Oti 


-20 


NW 


.30 


Cloudless 


St. Paul ... 


v.sa 


ts 


NW 




Pt Cloudy 


I.a Crosse. . 


:J0.I6 


13 


N 


•4 


Cloudy 
Cloudless 


Bismarck. . 


W.68 


-28 


NW 




Moorhead . 





—a 


N 




Cloudless 



Acreage on the hill, just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half interest In this forty 
acres can be had for $52,000 

80 Acrei at West End, near Brook- 
dale Division 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior 160 

1 Acres In the heart of the East End, 
on both tidas of Fourth street 30,000 



The best b»rgaln offered now is stock In the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An Investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate ot profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing In the history of Duloth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 



C. E. RICHARDSON, 

336 West Superior Street. 



T In rain poliiran Indicates trace One (1) 
Inch of rain or melted snow equals ton (10) In- 
ches of snowfall. Minus 1—) In temperature 
column indicates IkjIow zero. 

W. H. Fallon, 

Serreant Signal Corps 

Dcr.UTH, Jan. lo.— Local forecast for 
twenty-four hourn, ending 10 a, m. Jan. 
16: Colder fair iceather. 

t - — 

Washington, Jan. lo.— Forecast for 
twenty-four hours, ending 8 a. m. to- 
morrow: For Minnesota: Fair, north- 
erly winds, colder, except in extreme 
northwest portion stationary tempera- 
ture. For AorfA Dakota: Fair 
weather, variable winds followed by 
rising temperature Thursday. For 
South Dakota: Fair, yiortherly wiruis 
becoming variable, warmer on Thurs- 
day. 

An Excuite that Excused. 

Life: Miss Elder— Why were you not 
at my birthday reception yesterday, 
Mr. Smithers'/ Didn't you receive your 
card? • 

Mr. Smithers— Yes, but I mislaid it. 

Miss Elder But didn't vou remember 
the date? 

Mr. Smithers (without malice)— I 
thought I did until I heard a gentletMan 
say that you were not born yesterday. 



COFFIIi k WARNEIl, 

30 FAKGUSSON B£/X:K. 

80 Acres, section 9-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- 15. 
80 Acres, section 33-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-50- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15. 

All below the market. 
COFFIN & WARNER. 



w. c. sii[ewooD k CO., 

REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVE OSNITIKE BAJiOAINg IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

In diffc; parts of the city and 
ACRE PF.OPERTY ADJOINING. 



Mhakespearn as We Get It. 

"What is your favorite Shakespearean 
play, Mrs. Lakeeide?" 
"\Vf 11, 1 dunno as I know. I think 
. ^, , . , 'Dromio and Joliet' has some very fine 

for the breweries was 110,000,000, and passengers in it." 



[James Whltcomb Riley In the Century.] 
I was for union— you, Ag\a it. 

'Pears like to me each side was winner, 
Ixx>kln' at now and all at's in it. 
Le' 'esKO to dinner. 

Le's kind o" Je« set down together 

And 'lo some pardmarship forgittln'- 

Talk. say. for instunce, 'tiout the weather, 

■r soniepin' flttin'. 

The war. you know, 's all done and ended, 

.\nd ant cha:iKf.l no p'l'it» o' the compass: 
Uoth north and south the health's Jes splendid 
As ' fore the rumpus. 

Tlie old farms and the old plantations 

Still occuuies the'rold positions. 
Le's (fit back to old situations 

And old ambitions. • 

I«'8 let up on this blame. Infernal 

Xongue-lashln' and lap-jacket vauDtIn'. 
Aad jfot back home to the eternal 
Ca'm wo 're a-wantin'. 

Peace kind o' sort o' suits my illet— 

When women dt)CB my ctxjkln' for me 
Thor' wasn't overly much pie ot 
Durin' the aruy. 

I>oe» fCxpeneiiee Count? 

It does, in every line of business, and 
especially in compounding and preparing 
medicines. This is illustrated in the 
great superiority of Hood's Sarsaparllla 
over other preparations, as shown l)y the 
remarkable cures it has accamplished. 

The head of the Hrm of C. I. Hood & 
Co. is a thoroughly competent and ex- 
perienced pharmacist, having devoted 
his whole life to the study and actual 
preparation of medicines. He is also a 
member of the Massachusetts and Am 
erican Pharmaceutical aesuciations, and 
continues actively devoted to supervis- 
ing the preparation of and managing 
the business connected with Hood's 
Sarsaparllla. 

Hence the superiority and peculiar 
merit of Hood's Sarsaparllla is built 
upon the most substantial foundation. 
In its preparation there is representetl 
all the knowledge which modern research 
in medical scieace has developed, com- 
bined with long experience, brain-work 
and experiment. It is only necessary to 
give this medicine a fair trial to realize 
its great curative value. 



DancitiK and Deportment. 

Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No. 113 
West First street. Ladies" class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents', 
Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 

For Sale. 

Forty acree at a bargain, six miles out. 
A big snap in this. Come and s^e ab«ut 
it at once. Ekick.son, Stko.m <fc Co., 
211 Pastoret-Stenson building. 

Grand Skating Taarnaraant. 

A grand skating tournament will take 
place Saturday evening, Jan. 18, at the 
West End Parlor Skating rink. Twenty- 
first avenue west and Superior sti^t, 
between twelve young ladies. A fine 
gold medal will be awarded to the win- 
ner. Four competent judges will be on 
hand to award the prize. Walkers Mili- 
tary band will be on hand. Everybody 
should try and attend as it will be the 
finest match ever seen in Duluth. Ad- 
mission, gents, 25c; ladies, 15c; children, 
10c. The match will take place at 9 
o'clock sharp. Medal can be seen at 
rink. T. M. Ekicson, Prop. 

Capt. S. G. Johnson, Manager. , 

Any kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms. 



All we ask is for j. rtles to examine our list and 

compare them rlth other prices t>et'ore 

buying. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood & Co., 
REAL ESTATE. 

ROOM "B," - HUNTER BLOCK. 



B.C.GUIDLEY. J. C. MISHLRK 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 
Real Estate Brokers 

Koom %. Exchange Bu'ldlng. 
List your property with us at what It Is wortb 
and we will sell It. We Invite everybody to 
call In and see us. and solicit c<>rn^«ooudouoe 



6 PER CENTI 



IWjONEY TO LOAN IN 
' sums on Duluth 

Estate at 6 1-2, 7 and 

cent. No delay. 

JULIUS D. HOV'ARD, 

Room 3, - - Mil'»r Block 



ALL 

Real 

8 per 



GREAT EN6L1SB REMEDY! 

Murray's Specific. 



->a5i- 




We have at comnrfand unlimited 
amountsof money to lend promptly 
at 6 per cent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



Loans Made on Unimproved Property. 



^Z** A ffuarantet cure for all ner 
vouR disease such as Weak 
Memory, Loss ' Urain Power. 
Hysteria, Headache, Pain In the 
Back, Nervous Prostration, 
Leucorrhoea, Universal Lassi- 
tude, Seminal Weakness, Impo- 
tency and general loss "f power 
of the Oi'aeratlve Organs;— In 
— either sei. caused by indlscre- 
^atareTtUafi tl"n or over exertion, and which 
ultimately lead to Premature Trri* 
Old Aire. Insanity and Consump- 
tion. II. UO or a box or six l)oze8 
for I6.U0. 8out by mall on re- 
ceipt of. price. FuU partlcalars 
In pamphlet^sent free to every 
applicant. tTo Oaarantee Six 
Boxes to cure any case. For 
every 15.00 order received, we 

send six boxes, with a written^ 

guarantee to refund the money**j,-_j-i.i^_ 
If our Specific does not etfect a cure. Address 
sll communications to the sole manufacturer? 
TUB MUKUAY MKDICINKCO. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
noXA In DilClth hr W»t W<rth 





$O.CO"ofT( 



Set 
Of Teeth. 



GULLUM, 

Painless Dentist. 



Room 1-7. 40C West Superior Street, 
rarrutfton Block. I>uluib 



BUILOINO LOANS A 8PEOIALTY. 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PUROHABE MONEY MORTQAQE8 
BOUOHT. 

QOOD BONOS BOUGHT. 



UTICnO SIEtMFITM 



CUGUE & PRILE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 803 

OulutK National Bank Building. 



Sealed proposals will be received until 2 
o'eliK'k p. m , January' 3 Jth. 181NI. by E. R. Jeffer- 
son, chairman of committee on court house 
and county jail, for tlie stcam-houtiiiff appara- 
tus In the new county Jail, in accordance with 
plans and specitlcations drawn by O. G. Tra- 
phagen, architect, on file at the office of the 
county auditor. 

Each protKM>al must be acoouipanled with a 
certified cht^ck for two hundred dollar*;, to bo 
forfelte<I to St. Louis County In the e> ent that 
the proposal which said check accom anles 
shall be accepted by the county twmmissioncrs. 
and that the person makiug the pro|>osul shall 
fail to (Hiniply with its torms. 

Address all proi>osals to E. R. Jefferson, in 
careof county audllor, Duluth, Minn. 

For further idforniHtion apply to John F. 
Schleimes, suporititondent. Duluth. Minn. 

The cMmmissii.ners reserve the rig-ht to reject 
any and all prop<.>8alB. 

Dec li-lti-81-2i-28Jan l-4-8-lMU»«2. 



Here we are the first of a new 
year as bright and happy as 
children with new toys. You 
have just closed up the record 
of the year I 889, and we sin- 
cerely hope the balance is in 
your favor— "by a large major- 
ity." If your expectations 
were not fully realized, we are 
very sorry indeed, and trust 
you will not think us too famil- 
iar if we commiserate with you. 
Well, never mind, don't feel 
badly because you failed to 
make the most of your oppor- 
tunities, for it can't be helped 
now. Recollect that there is 
no teacher in the world whose 
lessons are so impressive as 
Old Mother Experience. It is 
an easy thing to look back and 
see where you missed it, and 
then, too, in looking back at 
these bad bre^s it seems so 
strange that you didn't know 
better. "Why," you say to 
yourself, "anyone who is half 
witted ought to have known 
better." That is true, but 
again we suggest that it does 
no good to harrow up your feel- 
ings in that way. The new 
year is spread out before you 
like a new blank book, all un- 
written. As the days go by 
the pages will be filled, one by 
one, and whenthe year is end- 
ed the volume will be closed 
and put away in yoiflr archives, 
and you will commence again. 
Since you commenced making 
up the book just closed, we put 
one of the finest pieces of 
suburban property on the mar- 
ket anywhere about Duluth; 
and simply because we offered 
lots at extrepiely low prices 
and on the people's easy pay- 
ment plan, a good many inno- 
cent and honest persons sup- 
posed that it was all a humbug 
and a cheat. We can't much 
blame them for jumping at the 
conclusion that it was outside 
farm land, instead of fine resi- 
dence property, because our 
prices were so low and our 
terms so favorable. But that 
is where many of you made a 
BAD mistake. Had you inves- 
tigated, you would have invest- 
ed, and so made money. But 
you can make amends for that 
this year. Now, in strict co'^fi- 
dence (which we beg of you 
not to repeat), we will tell you 
something: Water works, sew- 
ers and electric lights wiil be 
put in at Lakeside, Lester Park 
and Crosley Park, a system of 
parks and boulevards laid out, 
hundreds of fine new houses 
and comfortable homes built, 
suburban train service greatly 
improved— although it is ex 
cellent noW"-and the whole 
face of affairs changed. Lots 
that now sell for $125 each 
will then bring $250; lots that 
now sell for $200 will readily 
sell at $400, and so on. It is 
hard to understand how people 
who feel assured that all this 
great growth is so near at hand 
should wait. The wayto make 
money is to get ahead of the 
crowd and buy before the ma- 
jority of people do, and before 
the developments occur. Now, 
if you want to start out the new 
year right and make a record 
with which you will be satis- 
fied, take our advice and buy 
lotsjn Crosley Park, and buy 
NOW. If you wan't to make 
your money go as far as possi- 
ble, and thus make the utmost 
with it, buy what you can reach 
on the easy payment plan and 
keep up your weekly instal- 
ments, and you will be delight- 
ed with the results. Remem- 
ber, you will have no interest 
to pay, and that makes quite 
a difference. 

Hoping that you will do your- 
self a kindness by following 
our advice, and wishing you all 
a most happy and prosperous 
new year"-and many succeed- 
ing ones— we beg leave to sub- 
scribe ourselvts 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 

DR. GEO. B. HATCOCK, Maaager 



3 Performances Only 



— comrsNCiNO— 



MONDAY, JAN. 13 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 15 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



N 



Room 10, 



F. HUGO & CO., , 

MetUi)P.)L,1TAN Bix>ck 



TELEPHONE 242. 



THE GREAT 



LILLIAf' LEWIS 

In the followlnir repeitoire: 

Monday Ey'g, - As Id a Looking Glass, 
Tassday EYeniDg, - - L'lrticle47. 
tfednesday ETening, - Hef Hagdalen. 

Supported by W. A. WHITEOAR and h«r own 
:ompany, witii nil tlia orljrlnal scanary, show- 
ing tii« famous Mont* Oarlo by moonlight. 
New and gorgaous cottumai. 



GRAND SCENIC EFFECTS. 



PEOPLES THEATER, 

DULUTH, ■ JOHN 8. BArtNES, Miir- 



This week, commencing JAN. 1 3, 
The Great Attraction, 

PRISON LIFE 

—AND- 

ftie Best Vafietj Show in the Northwest 

ADMISSION: 

TEN CENTS ! TEN CENTS ! 



OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned, 
Curled and Dyed. ' 

Kid Gloves Cieanedi 

MRS. HUNTER, 106 Second St. East. 




WAHTS. FOB SALE. ETC 

ONE CENT A AORD IN ADVANCE. 

». A'lvertit^einents liudtrthis head received a.{ 
the lolloHinif piat-es. besides the busineesaY- 
flci.' ul Ihe Herald: 

Kudiou I-hartnacy, liT Tenth avenue east. 

IJojc«- A: TutuiHii, curuor Fourth avenue 
and biipi-rior Birc-et we«l. 

J. W. NelHun, No. ISO], corner Eighteenth 
ave-iuc west and Superior street. 

IJ. Joiiuiton. chief clerk PhUUps hotel. West 

Uuiltil. 




1^: 

w 



Help Wanted. 

ANTED— A cook for a Btual I family, 
quire, Si>l East s^ecoud street. 



In 



ANIKJ>— Twokitcheng^irlsal Hotel St 

iiOUltS. 



w 



ANTED- A tirst-class Gerniun nurse c-irl 
Address Koom •-•irj, I'lrgt National bank. 



WANTED— A Bteuoifrupher and typewriter 
for ten days. 



I WISH lo employ a few ladies on salary to 
tuiie churg-e of my !lU.■^ille^^ at tlitir homes. 
i.,ii[ljl, very last-inaiiiig^ and liealttilul Wajfes 
»la i»er weea. Kelcrt-ncc ^iveu. Good pay lor 
pan time. Address with ttamp, Mrs. Marion 
Walker, Loulsvilie, Ky. y 



/ 



\\7^J<l"liD— Box maker at Duiuiii Truikt 
TT factory. Apply ;J15 West Superi^ 



THREE 



WANTED— A g^irl lor (fenenii house work; 
fimiiy ol lUree. Call in loreuoon, *11 
Niuth avenue cast. 



-r* 



*«>C^t<^^^^'^-*"^'**" expenses in advanoe. 
CvJVy aliowc<i eufli moutli. sieadv om- 
piu.) uifiit at Uome or traveling-. No soliciting-. 
Duues delivi-riutr iiud mali.iUK' collec-lious. No 
posiu.1 Cards. Address with stamp. Hater & 
Co.. Fiqua, Ohio. 



WANTED— Pastry cook, also other help,- 
luiiuirc Phillips hoU'l. 

WANTED— At the Womaus Employment 
liuruau, ail superior jtreei east, two 
second giils and a duma girla lor ^'ueral 
house wurk. Employ nieut obtained free ol 
cost. Mrs. A. D. Ajers. 



Fur Suit). 
rr>OK SALE— A heavy working team cheap 
[J at A. W. Eiler's Mi Lake avenue south. 



1 



mm[ 



Bargains 



T^OU SALE— My residence wilii io or lOli feet 

' at olo Euat ^ec•oud stix-cl. Terms to suit 

purchaaer. E. A. Giibcru, «l Boani of Trade. 



HEAVV HOKSEd tXJK SALE— 15 head of 
heavy horses, raised at Lake Partt. on 
tlje Norllieru Pacitlc roail, lor sale by C W. 
liarve> . can oe soeu at Ho waru barn, on tbe 
lake shore, Minnesota poiut. lUrsldence. iCSS 
West Fuujlli street. 



Lost. 

L'JST— Part of a goid-iink cuff button in 
shape of three riugti. Lost in Su|»erior 
or Uuluth Finder wili receive reward by 
leariutj tlie same at my ulhce. Itobert G . Mo- f^ 
lioweii, S-'i V\ est aupmoi street. .' • 




LO.-T— The record and account book of the 
Friends lu Council society. OJUlains' 
tooul iOii pu(f, 6 and is eijfUl or nine iuche-i 
s<iuare. A iii.>eral reward will be paid tor its 
reiuru to Alworib'a abstract othce, <C!T VV'e^l 
Superior street. 



l-or Ii«ut. 

FOii RENT— D. slrable room: bath, gas, 
steam, etc.; private family. AddreiM S., 
Herald ollice. 




w 



ANTED -A furnished house for the win 
ter. L. J. Taussijf, No. y Plioenix block 



If taken at once. 



Land situated near 



FiuauciaiL 

DULUTH MOKTGAGK LOAN OOMPANW 
loans money in any amount on furni/ 
ture, piauos. hoi-ses and wagons witUout rt"- 
movai lixmi o-wuer's possession; also ou warc*- 
liouse receipts, bank su»ciis, and any properly 
ol value; uolesdiscounte i; partial paymeiil.-' 
received and jour own lime K'an tod lor pay- 
S'eut; no delay; inouey on haiiu uud lurnisbed 
immediately alter security is appixjved. Win. 
Horkan. Jilaua^er. Uoom 12, Fartrussou block. 
Duluth, Miuu. 




JF YOL WISH TO SELL OR BUY DULUTH 
or tuperior bank slock, corporation or in- 
vestment oecurities, call on or address B. Mur- 
phiu. Iii-oker, !) Bauuiuif block, Duluth, Minn. 



jN 



t; 





^ 



—THE. 



Greatest Snaps 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

"Vr *H. WILSON, ATTORNEY ANDOOCN- 

J3| • sellor at Law. Will practice in State 
ami Luited Slates Courts. All business K'^en 
prompt atteuiiou, t4Farg-usson Block, Duluth. 
Miuu. 

TJLASTERING. 

H, T. DINHAM. 

All kinds of plastering done. Jobbing i 
promptly attended to. Cttjce, room D, Hub- , 
ter block. ; 



R8. J. 8. DINWOODIB. 



M 

Teacher of Piano Forte, Voice and Sight Sing-- 
ing. Chorus and Choir Conductor. 



Music rooms at J. J. Wiggins's, lb Bast Su 
perior street, and at residence, 121 Tenth are. E 



M 



R. H. PARKER ROBINSON. 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION. 
8 MELES BLOCK. 



MCMILLEN St. STEBBINS, ARCHITECTS/ 
and suiHjrinlendents. Office, room No/ 
— . Exchange building. 



In the market. 



ADDRESS 



Your real(ty) friends, 

c. L LoyEn & CO,, 

32 Fargusson BIdg. I BOX A A, DULUTH, MINN. 



PALMER Si HALL. ARCUITBCT8 AHD 
Suuerliitendent«.room -W. Ebcchange build- 
Inn. Diilulli. Minn. E. S. Palmer. L. p. Hsil 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCeT 



FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table is supplied, and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 




Ghkat French remedy. Dr. LeDcc's pkr- 
10DIC.A.L HILLS, from Paris. Franc-e, act only on 
the gene -atlve organs in females and posi- 
tively cures suppression of meuifes Urom what- 
ever cause), and all periodical troubles pecu- 
liar to women. A safe, reliable remedy, war- 
ranted to excite menstruation or money re- 
funded. Should not lie used during pregnancy. 
The large proportion of the ills to which ladles 
arc subject is the direct result of a disordered 
and Irregular menstruation. IU)bt. Stevenson 
&Co.. rhlcago. III., H. Boswarth & Co., MU- 
waukee. Wholesale Agt«. The genuine only 
BuppUed by Boyoe & "AMman. 8o^ Agts., Du- 





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OtTiitTTH EVJUilNG TTIgTOAl.ll JAXTJABY 16 1890. 




SHALL JULY 0[SIBO! II? 



PROBLEM OF GOVERNMENT 



The Sentiment Appears to In 

dicate that They Should 

Do So 



Meaning 



Washington 



Building on 



School 
Second 



Street. 

To Make Needed Room for a 

Magnificent New High 

School. 



to make 

Bchool, 

build 

connec- 



Thia afternooD a meeting was held at 
the rooms of the Chamber of Commerce 
at which were present the board of edu- 
cation, its architect and a number of 
citizens interested in public school mat- 
ters. There was earnest discussion of 
an important question, and on this dis- 
cussion will probably hiajje the action 
of the board in the matter of certain im- 
portant details of the erection of a new 
high school building. 

The question to be discusse<i was, in 
brief wliether the board should tear down 
the present Wasliiugton school, on the 
block above second street and between 
Lake and First avenue east, 
room for a tine new high 
or whether it should 
the news chtK>l in 

tion with Washington building. As a 
new school would mvole an expenditure 
of $yO,(.H.iO to ^lt.K.),OU>, and as the Wash- 
ington building Itself cost about -^lUttHXi, 
it can be seen that the question was one 
of importance. It is also a great mo- 
ment when the expected growth of Da- 
luth in educational matters is consid- 
ered. 

There is a simple proposition made by 
members of the board of education, who 
quite generally favor a demolition of the 
Washington building. it is this. Al- 
ready Duluth has outgrown ' its high 
school facilities, though the present 
high school was built only two years 
ago. The Washington school site is the 
only one suitable for a high school that 
can be found; is it better to preserve 
that building, with all of its defects of 
sanitary construction and to add to it, or 
to begin at the ground and put up 
a school building worthy this city tiveor 
ten years hence': As an outlay of ^lUU,- 
OUU IS involved the board believes it is 
best to have it all good. It is, therefore, 
in favor of tearing down. But it didn't 
want to do anything until there had 
been an expression of views by citizens, 
and especially by those who were origi- 
aally interesteil in the construction of 
the Washington school. Hence this 
meeting. 

There was not a little discussion. *rhe 
board pointed out its errors in the past, 
errors made by economy and a loo low 
estimate of the growth of Duluth. 
They showed that a tJO-scholar wooden 
building, that they thought would do 
for several years, was in one year re- 
placed by a magniticent structure more 
than ten times as large, all of which i^ 
now occupied; and that the high school 
itself 18 ' already too small. 
The architect, Mr. Palmer of 
Palmer Jc Hall, was was present with 
drawings of both pUms, the one showing 
wings to the present school, utilizing it 
and perpetuating all its bad internal 
arrangements, the other showing a tine 
new structure, graceful and scientihcally 
adapted to school uses. 

It is but an illustration of the growth 
of this city that a §40,000 school build- 
ing three years ago, believed to be ample 
to all needs for years and fully abreast of 
the times, is now probably to be torn 
down to make way for a building of 
nearly three times the cost, which the 
board believes "will be ample for seven or 
ten years." 



K COMPANY 



To Drill Regalarly : an Important Meet- 
ing of the .Hem bent. 

There was a large attendance of mem- 
bers of Company K at Ingalls hall last 
night. For the past three months the 
company has been in a state of qui- 
esence. No meetings of any sort have 
been held, and from all appearances the 
military spirit had dickered out. Last 
night's meeting dispelled any such illu- 
sion, however. It was unanimously de 
cided to hold regular weekly drills com- 
mencing a week from nest Wednesday, 
the same to be kept up till the July en- 
campment. 

The matter of an armory was dis- 
cussed. For the present Ingalls hall 
will be used. When the Pythian castle 
is built the armory in that building will 
be utilized until such time the company 
sees its way clear to build a drill hall of 
its own. Capt. DeVV'itt and Lieuts. 
Tear and Eva were elected delegates to 
ths state convention of National Guards 
to be held at St. Paul, Jan. 21 and 22. 

SPORTING NOTES. 



Director Billings said yesterday that 
the Boston league team would beat the 
world in base running next season. 

"Honest" John Kelly stands ready to 
back Frank McHugh against any 
featherweight in the world for $1000 a 
side and a suitable purse, Cal. McCarthy 
preferred. 

The Players league has under con- 
tract seven of the tirst twelve batsmen 
of the .\merican association. 

The American association has lost 
■even catchers, six pitchers, three first, 
one second and two third basemen and 
three outtielders to the Players league. 

Brooklyn, with one of the strongest 
batting combinations in the country 
last season, failed to get a man in the 
first ten, Burna, their leading batsman, 
oommg in number eleven. 

The Chicago Brotherhood club has se- 
cured grounds at Thirty-third street and 
Wsntworth avenue for a long term of 
years. The grounds are about three 
miles south of the courthouse and ac- 
cessible by a cable line and three steam 
roads. They are extensire, and the 
work of improvement will be bsgun at 
once. 

The Western association is today not 
only a stronger organization, but it has 
better cities than the American associ- 
ation. Kansas City, in a good Western 
association, is a much better ball town 
than St. Louis with a club in the 
patched-up American association. 
Omaha is a much better ball town than 
Louisville. St. Paul and Milwaukee are 
better than Columbus and Rochester. 
The Athletics, crippled as the club will 
be, cannot expect to do anything against 
the Philadelphia league and Brother- 
hood clubs. Denver proved last year 
that it is a good ball town, b*tter than 
Toledo, 



Smoke the Endion cigar, the finest in 



the markat. 



W. A. PooTK A. Co. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

Unitarian literature furnished free 
npon application at Room D, Hunter 



"L'ArtloIe 47." 

As Cora the Creole in "L'Article 47" 
Lillian Lewis was well received by a 
small audience last evening. The play 
itself IB not pleasant, but in it there are 
many chances for the display of histri- 
onic talent of the highest order. In the 
last act Miss Lewis was at her best, and 
in the mad scene at prison simulated a 
mad person to such an extent as to ren- 
der the act uncomfortable. W. A. 
Whitecar appeared as George Duhamel. 
The impression he created in the role 
was favorable. Hazel Selden's Nina is 
worthy of notice. The company pro- 
duces "The New Magdalen," Miss Lewis 
taking the part of Mary Merrick. 



The Herald bindery has the beet 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptly. 



Hon. Seth Low Continues JUIm l>lscoorse 
on the »ul]Ject. 

[The Herald publi.-hes below a seventh 
installment of the address of Hon. Seth 
Low of Brooklyn, to the students of 
Johns Hopkins university. In view of 
the interest awakened in Duluth over 
municipal government and the future of 
this city, the matter will be of interest. 
It will be continued from day to day- 
till completed.] 

It is a reasonable and wise precaution 
that the power of the purse should not 
be given to the executive department, 
which, however necessarily must admin- 
ister and largely control expenditures. 
In most of the early .American city 
charters, full power over the purse,, both 
for purposes of taxation and for purposes 
of borrowing, was confided to the common 
council, or legislative branch of the city 
government. It is a suggestive fact that, 
in our largest cities, as the power of the 
executive has tended to grow, so the 
power of the common council has tended 
to decrease. The explanation is simple 
and sufficient. Whether theoretically it 
should be so or not, practically, .in our 
largest cities, the common council has 
abused almost every power committed 
to its keeping. The efficient working of 
the admiuistrative side of the city has 
generally been made impossible by the 
common council where they have been 
left in complete control of the purs* 
strings. Favored departments would 
have balances passed to their credit, and 
departments which were disliked would 
be starved into submission. 

The power of th* purse carried with 
it the ability to control patronage, and 
efficient administration along this line, 
also, was made impossible. Similarly, 
the right to create debt was abused, and 
extravagance of current administration 
was covered up by the use of the city's 
credit to be paid for by a later time. In 
New York and Brooklyn these evils have 
been successfully overcome, to a great 
extent, by the creation of a board of es- 
timate consisting of the chief officers of 
Lhe city. These officers, for the most 
part, if not in every case, are elected by 
the whole of the city, and thus have a 
responsibility to all the people instead 
of to the population of localities. They 
act in a fiercer light (when they meet at 
a given season of the year to prepare the 
annual budget) than surrounds the 
meetings of the common council. This 
board receives from the various depart- 
ments of the city government their esti- 
mate of needs for the coming year, to- 
gether with any explanation which may 
be necessary of the items. The sums 
determined upon for the various depart- 
ments by this board of estimate, in New 
Vork, I believe, are fin*I. In Brooklyn, 
they represent the outside limit of what 
may be raised by taxation. The com- 
mon council in Brooklyn has the power 
to cut down any item, but not to en- 
large it. Failure on the part of the 
common council to act by a given date 
causes the budget, as prepared by the 
board of estimate, to go into effect with- 
out change. The common council has 
Lieen deprived, further, of all right to 
transfer money from one account to an- 
other. The appropriations for each de- 
partment are placed upon the books of 
the comptroller to the credit of that de- 
partment, and all current expenditures 
on account of salaries and the like are 
made without further action by the 
common council. Special items, like an 
increase of the police force, or the con- 
struction of a tire engine building, must 
be voted by the common council, even 
though the sum has been raised in the 
budget specifically for that purpose. In 
other words, the mayor, while he is 
armed with complete powers of adminis- 
tration, does not control the purse 
strings, either as to determining the 
amount of money to be under his con- 
trol, nor as to the use of the money, ex- 
cept in current ways, after it has been 
appropriated. Practically, the system 
has worked well. It has prevented al- 
most every abuse whicd it was intended 
to prevent, and it has not presented any 
serious difficulties of its own. All meet 
ings of the board of estimate are public, 
and their action on controverted points 
13 certain to be a subject for discussion 
at the polls. In the meanwhile, the 
right to borrow money, except to in- 
crease the water supply and to make 
good, temporarily, deficiencies in the 
current collection of taxes, has been 
taken from the city altogether, nnless 
special authority i^ obtained from the 
legislature. It will be contended that 
this system meets, theoretically, the 
claims of a city to the control of its own 
ad'airs as fully as might be wished. 
Practically, hoAever, m such cities as 
have resorted to it, it has been found to 
produce better results tuan were 
achieved when the common council of 
the city enjoyed absolutely the debt- 
mnking power. 

Experience has taught the importance 
of this point, that when special work is 
to be undertaken 'oy a city, work for 
which its ordinary organization is not 
well adapted, so that it becomes neces- 
sary to create now agencies for the pur 
pj^e tje select. o . of the man or men to 
whom such special work is committed 
should be lodged with the mayor of the 
city, subject to the same conditions of 
constant responsibility to him as are the 
usual administrative departments. 

A commission named by the legisla- 
ture is a state body, and is responsible 
to no one except the legislature of the 
state. Not even the governor can call it 
to account. Commissioners named by 
the mayor, on the other band, even 
though they be named for a special pur- 
pose, may be made responsible to the 
mayor, and through him to the commu- 
nity whose funds they are handling. 
These two principles, if strictly observed 
on the part of jthe legislature as towards 
cities, would obviate many of the most 
serious scandals and difficulties which 
have been connected with American 
cities heretofore. There is another al- 
ternative which exists in some cities. 
The debt-making power is left with the 
city, but can be exercised only by the 
authority of a popular vote. I am in- 
clined to think that such a lodgment of 
power would make every city safe against 
any great abuse of its credit. I should 
fear its effect more m the other direc- 
tion, that it might prevent the use of the 
city's credit with a promptness and to 
an extent which good judgment would 
dictate. It seems clear, however, that 
the debt- making power should be exer- 
cised by a city, at all events in its broad- 
est reaches, only with the explicit con- 
sent either of the legislature or of the 
voters ot the city. 

[To bo oontlnued.l 



A 



The 



Color is Black and 

Participants Form a 

League. 



the 



MARINE MATTERS. 



Objects of National Negro 

League; Some Smart 

Darkies. 



Chicago, Jan. 15.— The .National Col- 
ored congress opened today at the Madi- 
son street theater. Many of the dele- 
gates who had been delayed in leaving 
home came in on the late morning 
trains, and as a result the arrivals at the 

theater were of a somewhat straggling 
character. T. Thomas Fortune, editor 
of The Age of New York, and under 
whose auspices the gathering had been 
called, was among the first to put in an 
appe^arance. With him were Rev. J. F. 
Thomas of Chicago, George A. Cecil and 
J. S. Uinton, Indianapolis; John Wash- 
ington, Terra Haute; W. A. Anderson, 
Wansville, and several others. From 
Cincinnati came A. J. Dehart, Robert 
Harlan, Daniel Kudd, editor of the 
Catholic Tribune; George Jackson, Ford 
Stith, Chas. W. Bell. While awaiting 
the coming of the delegates from distant 
points Mr. Fortune explained that the 
convention was the outcome of a pre- 
liminary meeting held in Nashville 
last year. Its object is to bring into ex- 
istence a national .A.fro-American league. 

"It is not intended," said Mr. Fortune, 
"that the League shall be other than a 
movement purely in the in^rests of the 
race rather than of individuals or poli- 
ticians. There are state colored leagues 
all over the country, and these we pro- 
pose to consolidate in )ne general body. 
The organization must be purely non- 
political, and its aim will be the correc- 
tion, not only of the political, but of the 
civil, social, and material disabilities 
under which we suffer, not only in the 
South but also in the North. There are 
five departments to which our efforts 
should be directed. First, the establish- 
ment of a national Afro-.\meri- 
can bank; second, of an emigration 
bureau to scatter information regarding 
the best points for the location and 
settlement of our people; third, a 
national committee on legislature to 
watch legislation, state and national, that 
is unfavorable to our race; fourth, the 
establishment of a bureau of technical 
education, to promote the establishment 
of trade schools among us, and five and 
last, the organization of a board of co- 
operative industry to establish co-opera- 
tive stores and manufactories in com- 
munities thickly enough peopled by our 
race to sustain such undertakings. We 
have received the endorsement and co- 
operation of such men as President 
Price, of Livingston college, North Caro- 
lina; John C. Dancy, of the same state, 
who seconded Blaine's nomination in 
the last republican national convention; 
Hon. H. Atw^^'^ ex-consul to San Do- 
mingo; Presiding Elder Heard, of Lan- 
caster, Pa., and over a score of other 
representative men of the race." 

It was nearly noon when Mr. Foster 
called the convention to order, and com- 
mittees on credentials and order of busi- 
ness were appointed. Tonight the dele- 
gates will be given a public reception at 
the First regiment armory. 



WEST END. 



CarlAun Loo»ted at Br»udon ; Other Mattant 
of the Second Division. 

Charles Carlson, the rioter, is at Bran- 
don, Man. A man here received a letter 
from him in which be (Carlson) asked 
him to take care of his property here. 
As the only thing that Carlson has here 
is a sewing machine, which John Dow- 
ling holds for debt, the gentleman did 
not have much property to watch. 

Miss Mabel Davidson, the expert fancy 
skater, gave an exhibition of her skating 
at Erickisons Parlor rink last night. The 
attendance was excellent. The band 
furnished delightful music for the 
skaters. 

The members of the Norwegian Luth- 
eran church hold their anr'inl meeting 
tomorrow evening. Electiou of officers 
will be held and the finances of the 
church will be examined. 

The Y'oung Peoples society of the 
Swedish Betbania church will hold a 
festival at the church next Saturday 
evening. 

The West End policemen find it rather 
inconvenient to get prisoners into the 
station house just now, as there is no 
jailer there, the regular jailer being on 
duty up town. 

Scarlet fever is now reported at 1708 
West Fifth street. 

FULL OF REMINISCENCE. 

Days at 



Commodore Sazten on the Early 
the Head ef the Lake. 

Commodore Saxton, who has resided 
at the head of the lake for thirty-five 
years, is full of interesting reminiscen- 
ces. The first time he struck foot on 
the soil ot Duluth was in May 30, 1855. 
He came up on the old Sam Ward and 
landed at the entry on Minnesota Point. 
Heavy timber grew down to the water's 
edge, and very little had been cut on 
this side of the bay. There was a little 
clearing where Old Superior is, and the 
work of builuing that town had just 
commenced. As time went on a few 
settlers built rough shanties at Duluth; 
there were perhaps half a dozen small 
clearings. 

The commodore was the first mover in 
the matter of getting a railroad to Du- 
luth. He agitated the matter early in '61. 
He examined the route, working this 
way from St. Paul, and surveyed the 
line which was afterwards the Lake Su- 
perior & Mississippi railroad. Author- 
ity to locate a route was made under 
the provisions of what was kfibwn as the 
Nebraska charter, drawn up in territorial 
times, which contemplated a road from 
the head of the lake to the Mississippi, 
and from thence to some point in N e- 
braska. Superior had a route all sur- 
veyed and a road partially built, which, 
ha!d it been carried through, might have 
located the big city at that interesting 
burg and, some claim, would have kept 
Duluth's light under a bushel. The 
commodore believed, however, that the 
finger of destiny always pointed at Du- 
luth as the city. That his prophetic 
vision did not deceive biiM the future has 
well demonstrated. 

Portland was the first townsite laid 
out, and this was followed by Upper and 
Lower Duluth. Step by step for many 
years the commodore watched the 
growth of the straggling village, always 
sure that the city would eventually 
come, but not dreaming that his expec- 
tations would be so wonderfully realized 
in so shert a period. It is deeply inter- 
eating to listen to his simple recital of 
the various stages of growth and develop- 
ment of not only Duluth, but the whole 
country adjacent and tributary. 



95k:i.33 
Will handle one of Thomas & Hendrick's 
5 acre lots on the hill. A rare bargain. 

L J. Taussig, 

Phoenix block. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate fiaiahings at 
The Herald bindery. 



Careful observers have noted the fact 
that no more steamers of the composite 
type are built for the iron ore trade. 

The new steel steamer being built for 
John Kelderhouse and others by the 
Union Dry Dock Company is expected 
to be ready for water by February 1. 
Her place on the stocks will be occupied 
by the new Wabash Line steel steamer, 
the material for which has been pre- 
pared so that it can be put together in 
a hurry. 

Charles Hubbard is credited with hav- 
ing purchased for the Hadley Transpor- 
tation Company, at Toledo, another 
steamer of the length of the Majestic 
but possessing more beam. James Da- 
vidson, of Bay City, iscretlited with hav 
ing made the sale, and although no price 
is given the transfer is thought to involve 
$150,000. 

Some people are still inclined to ques- 
tion the progress made in moving the 
sunken steamer, .\rmour. Al. Neil, 
manager of the Arnold tow of Port Hu- 
ron, while en route to Buffalo last week, 
came down past the .\rmour, and says 
that so far as he can see she has merely 
been turned around. The barge Wahna- 
pitii" was sunk at her bow and when 
pumped up brought the Armour's for- 
ward part with her, but the current 
caught them and swung them around, so 
that the .\rmour is merely headed down 
stream. 



Waked up KflTectually. 

A lethargic, dormant condititon of the 
liver is hardly to be overcome with dras- 
tic cathartics and nauseous cholagoguee. 
A gentler, pleasanter and far more effect • 
ive means exists of arousing the organs 
when somnolent. This is Hoetetter's 
Stomach Bitters, vouched for by the 
medical fraternity, tested by the public 
for many years. A resumption by the 
biliary organ of its secretive function, 
with the activity attendant upon health, 
a return to regularity of the bowels, and 
a renewal of digestion, are the no less 
happy and certain results of using the 
Bitters systematically. Its laxative 
effect is never painful and drenching, its 
tendency being rather to perpetuate 
regularity than to produce a copious 
attion. Malaria, nervousness, debilitv, 
kidney troubles and neuralgia it sub- 
dues effectually. 



A Keal}$ipook. 
.\ special to one of our leading daily 
papers from Cochrane, Wis., says: "For 
several years the existence of a ghost 
has been reported here. Last Friday a 
party was organized to investigate. Ar- 
riving at the ghost's walk, we saw an 
object about 10 feet high and G or 7 
inches in diameter. It slowly advanced 
to within a rod of the most daring. 
Some of the party fied, but those who 
remained saw it suddenly disappear." 
No European family of ancient lineage 
and blood, with any pretentions to note, 
is ivithout a veritable and well-authen- 
ticated ghost. "The Burlington" is 
away ahead of any of its competitors in 
this respect, as well as in those of fast 
time, 8moothnes.s of track, and elegance 
of equipment. This is recognized by the 
traveling public generally, and allowed 
by all who patronize the line. For tick- 
ets, time tables, rates, and any informa- 
tion, address agents of "The Burling- 
ton" or connecting lines, or write to W. 
J. C. Kenyon, general passenger agent 
Chicago, Burlington i Northern railroad, 
St. Paul, Minn. 



Commercial binding and printing re- 
ceives accurate and prompt attention at 
The Herald Job Rooms. 



B 



R 



O 



T 



H 



E 



R 



S 



R 



O 



W 



N 



ESTABLISHED 1882 



Hotels, Restauiants, 



-AND— 



TAKE NOTICE! 

We are agents for the celebrated 

Green Point China 



The Best In the World. 



Get our prices and you will be per- 
fectly satisfled. 



18 West Superior Street. 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY, 



MINNESOTA. 



First class In every way. Newly r 
Finest sample room Id town. Livery in 
eoBDectlon. WILI lAM GRANT, Prop 

Open November I. 



SCHILLING'S OeCHESTfiA 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished. 



ROOM 4U PASIOREI-SlEIISOi BLOCK. 

DULUTH, - - MINN. 



Notice to Cofitfactois. 



Sealed proposals will be received until 2 
o'clock p. m., January 3Ulh, ixHO, by K. R. Jef- 
ferson, cbairuiaii of committee on court house 
and county Jail, for the cell work lu the new 
county Jail, in accordance with plans, 8|)ecitt- 
cations drawn by (). G. Traphagen, architect, 
on flic at the office of the county auditor. 

Bidders will specify what quality and 
8tren>fth of chrauie steel they propose to use, 
and suliinit sample of same. They will also 
submit drawlng-s or samples of Ickiks and bars 
they propuM! to use, and all mechanical do- 
Tlces connected with the cells. 

Each proposal must )>o accompanied with a 
check for live hundred dollars to be forfeited 
to St. I.,ouis county. In the event that the pro- 
posal which said check accompanies shall be 
accepted by the county commissioners, and 
that the |M>rs<jn making the proposal shall fall 
to comply with its terms 

Address all proposals to E. K. Jefferson, In 
care of county auditor, Duluth, Minn. For 
further Information apply to 

JOHM V. SCHLKHNKS, 

Superintendent, Duluth, Minn. 
The commissioners reserve the right to re- 
ject any and all proposals. 
Deo U-Di^l-H-iUtin l-4-8-ll-15-lli-2S. 



MO ALUM — NO AMMONIA — NO LIME- 
NO PHOSPHATES. IN 

^« I Ce. 

CREAM 

Baking Powder 

MOST PERFECT MADE. 

Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for more than a quarter of • 
ooatory. It is used by the United States Government. Indorsed by the heads of the 
Ovwt Universities as the Strongest, Purest and Most Healthfal. Sold onl/ in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDEII CO. 



'^ 



WANTED I 



YORK. 



CHICAGO. 



ST. LOUIS. 



SAM rKANCISCO. 




leii 



FOR SALE: 



i-U-ln Hcteage, 
H-15~ln Icteaie, 
Superiof Stieet 
Dock Propeily, - 



1, 



- 1,000.000 



Lots for Scile as low 
as $25 each. 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 



601 West Superior Street. 



Mortgages Negotiated. 

6 AND 7 ^'ER CENT. 



Lowest rates for all sizes and grades of 
security. Before borrowing elsewhere in- 
quire of 

N. J. UPHAM, 

Under First Nat. Bank, 
NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



Certlilcate of AmeniJeiJ 



ARTICLES OF INCORPORATIOII 



OF LAKESIDE LAND COMPANY. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, I „ 
Cou.NTV or St. Locis. f 

KNOW ALL MEN BV THESE PKKSENTS, 
That we. Ozora P. Stearns, president, 
and Wm. C. Sartrcnt, secretary, of Lakeside 
Land comnaov, a corporation ori^anlzed and 
doliiK busln«fc under the laws of Minnesota, 
beiu(f duly and severally sworn, do hereby cer- 
tify and depose that at a regular meeting of 
the shanlioUiors of the said Lakeside Land 
conipiiny, iluly called and held at the ofHces of 
said company at Duluth, Minnesota, on the 
fourth day of January, IWXi, at two o'clock in 
tlie afternoon of said day. llie articles of liicor- 
|)oratlou of said corporation were amended so 
us to increase the capital stock of said corpor- 
ation from one hundred and tweuty-Hve thou- 
i^aiid dollars, to tlve hundrtnl thousand dol- 
lars and so as to Increase the number 
(if shares in the capital stix!k of said corpor- 
ation fn)m twelve hundred and fifty to five 
thousand, by amending Article :! of said 
original articles of incorporation, which fixes 
the amount of the capital stock of said cor- 
|>oratlon at one hundro<l and tweuty-flvo thou- 
sand dollars, so as to read as follows, to-wlt: 

AKTICLE ."5 

"The amount of the capital 8l<ick of the cor- 
poration shall be Ave hundre<l thousand dol- 
lars, (*.jt)0,(lOU.«t); to be paid in on call of the 
board of dirt'ctors." 

And by amending Article V of said original 
articles of Incorporation, which fixes the num- 
ber of shares in the capital stock of said cor- 
porpatlon at twelve hundred and fifty, so as 
to road a.s follows, to-wlt: 

ARTICLE 7. 

"Tlio numl)er of shares In the capital stock 
of the corporation shall be five thousand (.^,(HW), 
each of the par value of one hundred dollars 
(*ltK) UO), which shares when fully paid up 
shall be non-assessable." 

That there were present at said meeting, 
who vote<l in favor of said amendments a 
majority in number of the shareholders of 
said corporation, who held a majority In 
amount of the shares of stock of the same. 

07.0H\ P. Ste.\kns, 
Wm. C. Sargent, President. 

Secretary. 



Subscribed and sworn to before tne this "th 
day of January, IKflO. W. E. Pkkkv, 

Notary Public, 
St. Louis county, Mluuesota. 
Notarial Seal, 
St. Louis Co.. Minn. 



OFFICE OF KEGI.STEK OF DEEDS. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. ( _. 
County or St, Locis. f 

I hereby certify that the wi'.hin articles were 
filed In this ofllce for record on the Mh day of 
January, A. D. IHUO, at 3:10 o'clock o. m., and 
was duly recorded In Book O of Miscellaneous 
page 6. 

Amo.s Shephard, 
Keglsterof Deeds. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, ( 
Departmkst or State, f 
I hereby certify that the within instrumen t 
was filed for record in this ofllce on the 11th 
day of January A. D. ISSMI, at fl o'clock a. 
m., and was duly recorded In book Y of Incor- 
porations on page S70. 

H. Mattson, 
Secretary of State. 

Jan. 13, 14. 16. 16. 17. 18, 30. 



DB.E.C. WEST'S 



NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 

Sp<'cifi(? for Hypt*'ria, nizxiness.KitH. Neural^'lft. Wake 
Inlne^H, Mental r>i'pivfision, Sorteiiinjr of the itraiii, re- 
^iilttrij^ In ln«anltyanil k-adintr to mi?«erj' *'t-*"ay ami 
ilf^ilh, Pr<'maturo "Old Ago. H.iirennriw, ho»y ot Powfr 
tnt'tiher t<ex. Involuntary l,0(*'<es, und Rp^^rmatonhoca 
taimed hv ovcr-tsxertion of tlie brain, OpIf-nl'U'O or 
t»vfr-lridMlKt'n''o Enrh box oontain^ one month'.- treat- 
inimt. 9l tt ttox. or i*ix for $.'i, ^ent by ma>l pre|>:iid. 
Willi etirh order tor kJx boxon, will hond pun huser 
>r»iaranl»*e to rt*fund nion»y if the tretttnuiii lailu to 
(^ure. Uuarontoed ii^bUcU andi^euuuio huliluolyby 

Bovce & Totman, Phoenix Drug Store, and 
7 West Superior street, sole as^eats, Duluth, 
Minn. 



EW HOTEL. 

THE 




Purchasers for 



BM 



Ike Valuable aod Nice-Lpg Lots 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



8t. Paul, Minn., 

C*r. 4tli a»d 'W»«lilMVt«H tm. 

On CabU Car Line. Best TaUe In lb* Nona 
wesL Katai 18^ aod Upwards. 

W. B. Babxis. 



HARWOOD'S 

Cit| Iransportitioi) Freight ind Express, 

DRAYS. 

Offitje, 17 First Aveaue Weet. 



-:- WILL B[ SOLO VERY CHEAP -:- 



-ALSO- 



Three Good Building Lots on Ninth Street. 



r! 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFICE 

17 Fint Avenue West. 



FOR SALE 



Forty Acfes 



ADJOINING! 




-AT A 



Bargain 



Inquire of 



L.S., 



Near Third avenue east 



-? 



All these are well located and very accessible. 
Good schools and graded streets close by. 






Apply by letter or in person to 



"ED," 



c^A^EE :e±jbie^.z^tjid^ 




R. KROJANKER, 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 



Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
kinds of furs a specialty. $^ Good workm * ^- 
ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 
209 East Superior Street, • . Duluth, Minn. 



\ 



O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Riioms ilO, l\\ and 5U, Duluth Union National Banit Building. 



THE BOLTON HOT MM MM 



Hns the best record for the longest time 
in the coldest climate. See one set up 
in Our store. 

P. V. DWYER & BROS., 



Telephone 179. 



207 W. SUPERIOR STREET. 



MEMBERS OF THE 



Post office Box A A. 



DULUTH CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION. 



I 



Annericain Exchange Bank 
Bell & Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Security Bank of Duluth 
State Elank of Duluth 
National Bank of Commerce 
Marine Bank 



CAPITAL. 



SURPLUS 

$300,000 $200,000 
100,000 10,000 



1,000,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
260,000 



i 00,000 
26,000 



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JJUJLUTH BVENTNG HEBALD: JANUARY 15, 1890 



I 



WORLD or COiWEnCE. 



The Markets Are All Dull for 

Grain and Stocks 

Today. 



Gossip of the Boards; Daily 

Movement; Prices on 

Stock. 



There was a little more done in wheat 
today, but still business was very dull. 
The trading was all in May and at I4 
below yesterday's prices, in sympathy 
with a general decline in all American 
markets. There was a little demand 
for cash wheat, but it was mainly con- 
fined to on track stuff. 

At the close No. 1 bard regular was at 
79 nominal and fresh receipts at 80; Xo. 
1 northern regular TtJ, fresh receipts 77; 
No. '1 northern 73 bid. January closed 
at 7y for No. 1 hard and 7t) for No. 1 
northern. May openeil ,"4 lower at 84 J4, 
held steady all day and closed at Hi>4 
bid, S4'\j asked. May No. 1 northern 
sold and closed at Sl^^g. 

The Uailr .UoTvinent. 

Cars on track here: Oats .3. Receipts 
none. Shipments: Wheat 1062 bu. In- 
spection: Wheat, 10 cars of No. 1 north- 
ern. Minneapolis, cars 181, against ±12 
yesterday. Minneapolis receipts, 100,720 
bu. Shipments: Flour, I3,G.j5 bbls; 
wheat, .{4,220 bu. Chicago cars: Wheat, 
45; corn, 210; oats, 1,>7; rye, 23; barley, 36. 

XjSl»X Week's (.irinil. 

The output of the Imperial mill for 
the week ending Friday at 5 p. m. was 
78c>2 bols, a daily average of 1300 bbls, 
less by a few bbls than usual. 

The following dispatches are over the 
private wires of W. W. IJill, successor to 
Pressy, Wheeler ifc Lewis: 

Wueat market dull and easier. Trad- 
ing chieriy of a scalping character with- 
in the narrow range of '4C. The chief 
weakening intiuence was news from 
Minneapolis that one large mill was 
about to close because the markets were 
glutted with tlaur and milling could no 
longer be dona without loss, and that 
several other mills were likely to adopt 
the same course. While this was not 
generally credited it was accepted as a 
"pointer" and added to a growing bear- 
ish sentiment. The dullness of the 
tiour trade being so notorious, the close 
was tame, the chief support being pur- 
chases against puts. Corn dull but 
fairly tirm on light receipts. 

New Vurk Stockii. 

The following are closing prices on the 
New York stock exchange as reported by 
W. W. Bill JC Co.: 

TWay. tester- 

ChiciiKO, BarIin(rton i Qulncy . 106Vi luH'j 

Aajtri,.'aii fottou Oil 30!^ aiM^ 

>ri-s..uri Pai-idc 7:i5i Vi'i 

Northern HaciUc preferred 73>» 7:i'j 

Cbieag^u. Milwaukee Ji St. Paul.. «.'•■''» tf**"-* 

Sutrar trust 55 52's 

Gas Trust 46S 45'» 

Luubviile & .Na:<hville 87it i^^d 

ChicttxoJt Northwestern 110'^ llO's 

Kock Uiuua a«i, ««', 

Lake Shore _.— -llH^j IIU', 

Kea.|ii:K: m\ XS'4 

Kicliruoiid TermiQal 21 aii* 

Atfhi=,»n 314 3ii^i 

Delaware & l,ackawanna 13.')^ ISn'i 

Western uion SJS 83', 

Lead Trust 3UHi 3U 

UnionPa^ittc 6BS 67', 

OU luo lots, 

Chicago Close. 

Chicago, Jan. 15 —1:15 p. m. close— Wlieat 
about !• eaily; January, TB^*; February, 77H; 
May, >1',. Corn, steady; January, 3SJi; Feb- 
ruary, -SiW May, 3H4. 

The .VinnoBpoiU Close. 

Minneapolis. Jan. 115.— Closing quotations- 
No, 1 hanl, January, 71); February, 79: 
May, KJ; on tiack. 7t»'-j. No. 1 northern, 
January, 77: Feb. 77; May. SO"?»&-«|ii; on 
track, 77 'i-ii.^. No. 2 northern. January. 7*; 
February 71: May, 78; on truck, 74(<6i5H. 



PERSONAL. 



M. X. Berg, a Cloquet jeweler, is at the 
Merchants. 

Mr. Charles E. Taft, the government 
agent who is collecting information re- 
garding the shipbuilding industry of the 
United States, arrived in the city this 
morning from Washington. He will re- 
main here several days, and inspect the 
McDougall yard. He is at The Spald- 
ing. 

Mr. Joseph Lyman and wife of Boston, 
are visiting intue city. 

Casnier W. D. Underbill, of the Booth 
Packing company, left this morning for 
a visit to Chiuago. 

Mr. John M. Millar, Grand Marais, is 
in the city. 

Dr. \y. P. Allen, Cloquet, is registered 
at the St. Louis. 

A. C. Brand, Emil Nelson, Mrs. West- 
dahl. Misses Larson and Pearson make a 
party of Two Harbors people -rho are 
guests at the Merchants. 

Chief Hafey of the lire department was 
presented with a handsome gold badge 
last night 

Mr. A. C. Miner, traveling passenger 
agent of the Wisconsin Central road, is 
in the city. 

Capt. R S. Hayes, president of the St. 
Paul Jk Duluth railroad, arrived in St. 
Paul from New York last night, having 
been called by Col. Dudley's very serious 
illneas. 

Register Res .me. 

At The Spalding: M. C. Newburgh, 
F. Prentice, E. J. Cardozo, New York; 
L. Wes^sel, George S Ostrom, J. B. Buck, 
S. G. Chadsey, Chicago; John Murphy, 
W. H. Denny, E. F. Walsh, St. Paul; H. 
C. Botsford, Minneapolis. 

At the St Lcjuis: G. A. Burland, 
Marshall, L E. Bondy, Minneapolis; J. 
A. Lawrence, F. W. Ives, D. B. Parsons, 
P. A. Lakly, St. Paul; J. K Emerson, 
La Crosse. 

At the Merchants: D. S. Mather, On- 
tario; W. Deary, Thomas Contrie, Chip- 
pewa Falls; E. W. Folsom, Chicago; 
James Haves, N. P. Junction; E. L. 
Kentield, Charles Cault, St Paul; 
Charles Ray, White Bear; W. W. Pocter, 
Minneapolis. 

DISTRICT COURT. 



G. M. Hanchett et al. vs. G. G. Hart- 
ley et al. set for trial Feb. 8. Edith 
Munson vs. Lewis G. Baker, passed 
temporarily. H. E. Long vs. N. J. Mil- 
ler, dismissed. Everybody was frozen 
up by this time, and the judge ad- 
journed to his office. 

"rea l EST AfiT 

A Record of the Real Kstate Transfer* for 
'i\ Hount, Ending at Noon. 

Maude Mackenzie to Charles K Haines, 

lots II and li, block lU. West Duluth. 

First dlvi.-*ion ■■ •■ 

Louisa H Smith to Walter H Lanoey, 

lots 2y an.l 30, block 5, Kensingrton 

Hark addi'ion ;;;i li," ■j 

Same to S V Stewart, lots J5, J8, r> and 

:S<. bliK-k tl, same • — ■■•■ 

Same to Edward H Sparkman, loU 1. A 

Sand 4, block 5, same.... ....;....-. •• 

Same to John H Munllck, lots io. 46. 47 

and 4^ bkKrk 7, same /.•••.■•.v 

Same to John F Krieker, lote 41. 43, 43. 

44. 4'>, 4e, 47 and 4.S block 6, game 

Same to .\uuie U Seabrook, lots 35 and 

3ti, block 4. same vv:^ 

Same to Rosalie W Bayuard, lot 38. 

block 4. stinie ■ • • • • • • • 

Same to J J Edwards, lots 1, 2. i and 4. 

block ti, same 

Same to \V H Jones, lots 37, 38. 39 and 

41). same • v.' ' ' J 

Same ^) Andrew Moreland. lots 33 and 

:i4, blocx 4. same ........ 

Same to Ernest H Prinfrle, lots 1, 3. 3, 4. 

5. ti. 3it. ;*.i, 31 and :i.'. block 4. same.... 
Same to Dr John S Uuist, lots 35. 36, 37. 

3!^, 3St and :it», block 3, same 

Same to F B Hacker, lots 35 and 26. block 

1. same 

Same to H P Spear, loU SB. 3B. 37 and 38, 

block 7, same • 

Same to James Farie. Jr. lot 37, block J. 

Same to Sarah (i Wiliiius, lots 31, 33, 23 
and 34. block 4. same 

Sam" to E Montague Grimke, lots 1, 3. 
3, 4, 5. 6, 43, 44. 45, 46. 47 and 48. block 3. 
same , ■ 

George H Bunnell to Laurence Burns. 
lot 13 In McDoutfalls sub-division of 
block S*.i, Second division 

John .\ Wattcrworlli to Wm F McKay, 
part of lotj 3 and ;i, block 57, West Uu- 
futh. Second division 

Mary L Mix to C C Shapleijfh, lot 3, 
block 14. Helms addition 

C C" Shapleijfh to C F Mi.\. same 

St Haul At Duluth railroad to Daniel 
DuKg-an, the n'-. of ^w'^, 33-49-16 

Thos Sharp to Hans Entfclsen, lot 6, 
block 3, Sharps luldition 

Thos F Iph.^m to W A Hol^ate, ne"^* of 
ne^^ of nc"4, lH-50-14 

John Brawn to Jolui Miller, 6*4 of lot 88, 
Kast seventh street. First division 

Lawrence Burns to George H Dunnell. 
lot 13. ,MclX)UKall.s ^ub-di vision of 
block I'u. ■H-cuud division 

Daniel Uujr^rau to Elijah t' Grldley, un- 
dividwi ^ of the n^ of the sw^. 33- 
4«-K. 

Charles Hanson to N J Upham. the eVi 
of the nw'4. '.t-4!t-15 

John Flood to Hans P Nelson, ne"* of 
uw';* of nw'i. 3.->-4l*-15 

Walter .Marshall to H ASmilh, the west- 
erly 6 acre:- of thee' J of the ne'.! of 
se^i. itt-V-U 

West Duluth Maniifacturinjf company 
to riios Hallons. lot II. block 146, West 
Duliuh. Filth diiisiou 

\V Hill t<i John B r(f. lot B, block 21, 
Macfarlaiies Grassv I'oiut addition . 

Daniel l>ut?).'au to David Stewart, the 
ri'j of thesw'4. ;JV41»-15 

Marcus V Ma^ou 10 Eilward L Morris, 
thew'j of the se'*, 13-50-15 



1 

300 
600 
600 
600 
1,300 
300 
150 
600 

tioe 

300 
1.500 
900 
3t0 
600 
150 
600 

l.SOO 

260 

730 

1 
1 

1.300 

300 

14.000 

460 

2G0 

1.400 

4,000 
900 

8,400 

aoo 



4,8011 
6.000 



35 transfers: total J66.848 



MARQUcTJJ^ETS ONE. 

And Why Doesn't l>uiutli. When Money is 
Approprlate<l ? 

A letter has been received at Mar- 
quette from the life saving service as 
follows: 

"Arrangements are being rapidly per- 
fected for the erection of a life saving 
station at Marquette, and we hope to 
advertise for proposals in March. The 
plans are nearly ready, and permission 
has been obtained from ♦he lighthouse 
board to occupy land on its reservation. 
The letter enclosed a blue-print of a 
plat showing the positions which the ser- 
vice desires to occupy. By this print it 
appears that the site selected for the boat 
house and launchiug ways is adjoining 
the breakwater. The dwelling will be 
erected near the west end of the light- 
house reservation. 

Duluth has money available for a life- 
saving station and while we do not need 
one as much as Marquette, near which 
place are many dangerous and exposed 
beaches, many lives would doubtless be 
saved here also. Let us have that sta- 
tion. 



WEST OULUIH. 



Very Large 
Going 



Amount 
on at the 
Furnace. 



of Work 
Blast 



The First National: Minor 

Matters of Notes and 

News. 



One Judge Frozen Out; The Other Too 
Cool for Comfort. 

Judge Stearns opened court this morn- 
ing by excusing Juror Swenson on ac- 
count of illness. The temperature was 
low enough to make anyone sick. 

The jury in the case of Perry vs. Nel- 
son, awarded the plaintiff d403.&5. The 
jury in Pretracello vs. Sharvy as sheriff, 
staid out all night and were marched to 
the Merchants hotel for breakfast and 
went back to court in a delightful state 
of disagreement. After a short post- 
breakfast session they announced they 
were unable to agree. R. H. Hartley vs. 
The State Bank, with W. W. Billson as 
counsel for the plaintiff, attracted a large 
crowd and reached the jury about noon. 

Judge Ensign's room was tastily 
trimmed in frost icicles, and the blind 
goddess struck for warmer quarters. 
The following disposition of cases was 
made: Dwyer et al vs. Monroe et al, 
the defendants Burrell &. Little, and 
James F. Dacy asked leave to amend 
their answers, and were granted time. 



THE CIT Y IN DANGER. 

Look Very Closely to Vour Fires I'ntil 
Water .Mains are Repaired. 

There is trouble of a serious nature 
with the water supply. A big break 
has occurred in the 20-inch main on 
Bench street at New York avenue, 
through which the entire city supply is 
drawn. 

The Water company have a force at 
work and the break will be 
repaired as speedily as possible. 
In the meantime the city is 
menaced with serious danger in case of 
tire. The pressure mo'st of the forenoon 
was down to forty pounds and at times 
to twenty-live pounds. It may even be- 
come necessary to stop pumping for a 
time. This is liable to have a serious 
effect upon the service pipes, which will 
have a tendency when the pressure is 
removed to freeze up and burst. 
The cause of the trouble is 
what is known as water-hammer. The 
force of the column pumjied into the 
pipes is not overcome as it should be by 
air cushions. These should be put in 
the mains at least every two blocks, but 
for some reason there are none, except- 
ing what are in the vicinity of the pump 
house. Consequently these breaks are 
liable to happen at any time when the 
necessary pressure is exerted. 

Another serious matter is that the 
wires connecting the tire alarms with 
the engine houses are crossed in such a 
way the current is broken, and there can 
be no alarms turned in until the trouble 
is rectified. 



Prepare for the grand skating carnival 
at the West End Parlor skating rink. 
Twenty-first avenue west and Superior 
street, Friday evening, Jan. 17. Three 
good prizes to be given away, one for the 
finest ladies suit, and one to the gentle- 
man with finest suit, also one to the per- 
son wearing the most comical suit. 
Come and have a good time. Walker's 
military band will furnish music. 

r. M. Ekickson, Proprietor. 
Capt. S. G. Johnson, Manager. 




The Duluth Iron &. Steel company 
have commenced the work of putting up 
the incline plane, which is being con- 
structed by the Berlin Iron Bridge com- 
pany, of Berlin, Conn. This incline plane 
is constructed wholly of iron. It is 
about 400 feet long, running from the 
stock-house on the ground level to the 
top of the furnace stack, about ninety- 
five feet high, which makes it at an 
angle of about thirty degrees. It is for 
the purpose of carrying the raw material 

from the stock-house to the furnace. The 
incline plane is made of girder-plate and 
angle iron, supported by four latticed 
trestles or towers, which are also of 
angle iron. The structure is capable of 
sustaining a load of 15,000 pounds while 
going at the rate of 300 feet per minute, 
and is guaranteed against any collapse 
of the loaded car, alst> against any wind 
pressure. 

The same company has the contract 
for putting up a boiler-house over a 
battery of sixteen boilers. It is to be 
constructed entirely of iron, iron posts 
and trusses, and the top and sides are to 
be covered with corrugated iron. The 
tirm of Best, Fox & Co., 
of Pittsburg, Pa., has the 
contract for all material, doing the work 
for supplying the plant with water. The 
water supply consists of two Barr 
pumps, each with a capacity of 1,500,000 
gallons a day. They also put in the 
steam and boiler feed supply and all the 
pipe work necessary, also for a sys 
tem of drainage for carrying the 
water away. The water is obtained by 
means of a conduit four feet square, run- 
ning from the reservoir to the St. Louis 
river, and the water is then pumped into 
an iron tank, 14 feet in diameter and 60 
feet high, which is being constructed by 
the Gogebic Iron works of Duluth. This 
tank rests on a stone foundation alxjut 
20 feet high, which gives a head of 
eighty ftet to force the water to the dif 
ferent parts of the works. 

As soon as the incline plane is finished 
the hoisting engine, which is now on the 
ground and was furnished by the Beck- 
ett Foundry company of Arlington, N. 
J., will be put in place. The engine 
furnishes the power for elevating the 
car. 

A stock-house is also being construct- 
ed, 150 feet long by 50 feet wide and .35 
feet high, into which the cars will be 
placed on trestles sufficiently high to 
allow the raw material to be dumped 
into bins. The lining of the furnace 
stack of fire brick is all completed, and 
the stack and stoves are now being dried 
out ready for work. Atxjut two month's 
time will complete this work. 

The Manufacturers Bank of West Du- 
luth held its anuual meeting yesterday 
aftefHoon. The old board of directors 
were re-elected as follows: Col. W. E. 
Tanner, W. H. H. Stowell, H. A. Ware. 
M. O. Hall, J. D. Boyd, R. S. Munger 
and H. P. Smith. The board will meet 
Thursday and will probably re elect the 
old officers who are, W. H. 11. Stowell, 
president; M. O. Hall, vice-president; H. 
P. Smith, cashier. At . the meeting a 
resolution was passed authorizing the 
directors to take all necessary steps with 
the object of a consolidation with the 
Bank of West Duluth, looking to the 
formation of a national bank as first 
mentioned in The He-aid several days 
ago. It is probable that of the active 
officers of the new bank H. P. Smith will 
be president and R. Crombie, cashier. 

Sunday afternoon Scandinavians of 
West Duluth formed a society for mutu- 
al benefit to be called the West Duluth 
Scandinavian Union. The following 
officers were elected: President, John 
W. Peterson; vice-president, L. L. Aune; 
secretary, M. J. Solberg; assistant secre- 
tery, C. Swanson; financial secretary, O. 
Olson; treasurer, O. S. Olson; chaplain, 
Oscar Johnson; physician. Dr. J. T. 
Burnside: marshal, X. S. Lind: vice-mar- 
shal, Peter Rauen; guardian, O. EUstrom; 
trustees, O. O. Wold, L. L. Aune, Peter 
Rauen. Meetings will oe held weekly. 
The society starts with twenty-five 
me Tibers. 

The Rev. Mr. Moore is suffering from 
a severe attack of influenza. M. L. 
McMinn is also down with the" same 
trouble. Their friends hope they will 
have speedy recovery. 

The wife of A. J. Royd is very ill and 
much fear is entertained that she will 
not recover. 

The funeral of the wife of Jens Holt, 
residing on Second avenue, who died yes- 
terday from pneumonia took place this 
afternoon. 



THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON, Proprietor. 



Stfictli First-Class in all Uppointments. 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



POWDER 

Absolutely Pure. 

This powder never vanes A marvel of pur- 
ity, strenxth and wholesomeness. More eco- 
nomical than the ordinary kinds, and 
cannot be sold in competition with the multi- 
tude of low test, short weight, alum or phos- 
phat^j powders. Sold only In cans. Royaj 
Baking Powr>BH Co.. 108 Wall street, N T 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 

— .4NI>— 

INSURANCE. 

2, Exchange Bidg. 

MINN. 



Rooms I 

DULUTH. 



Mortgage Sale. 



DEFAULT HAVING BEEN MADE IN THE 
payment of the sum of three hundred 
fifteen r,o-lilO dollars (WI.'i.tOi, principal and 
interest, which Is claimed to lje due at the diitc 
of this notic-c upon a certain mortjfjiu-e. duly 
executed and delivered by Francis X. Parent 
and .Mary E. Parent, his vlfe, to Henry F. 
Davis. tML'aring date the seventh day of June. 
A. 1). is,"^, iiml duly recordt d In th« offlce of 
the rcKister of deeds in and lor the county of 
St. Louis, and state of Minnesota, on the 
eighth day of .lune A. I). 1889, at 8 o'clock and 
10 minutes. K. .M., in Book 41 of MoitK igt^s. on 
page tiT, and no action or proceeding at law 
or otherwise? having be<.n instituted to recover 
the debt secured by said Mortgage, or any part 
thereof: 

Now therefore, notice Is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a power of sjile c-ontained in said 
mortgage, and pursuant to the statute in such 
case made and pnjvided, the said .Mortgage 
will be foreclosed, and the premises described 
in and covered by said mortgage, viz: 

Lots three j^iand four (■It, of section eighteen 
(18). and lot (3), of section nineteen i.X'H), all 
in township sixty-three fB3). north of range 
twelve (I2i, west of the 4th principal meridian 
In St. UjuIs c*ounty. and staU? of .Minne- 
sotu, with the hereditaments and appur- 
tenances, will be sold at public auction 
to the highest bidder for ca-h, to pay said 
debt and Interest, and the tuxes, if any 
on said premises, and twenty-live dollars 
attorney's fee. as stipulated in and by 
said mortgage In case of foreclosure, and the 
disbursements allowed by law; which sale will 
Ik3 made bv the sheriff ^f said St. Ixiuls 
county, at the front door of the Court House 
In the city of Duluth in said county and state' 
on the auth day of January A. 1). ismi, m 10 
o clock a. m. of that day, sutiject t<i redemi)- 
tion at any time within one year from the day 
of sale, as provided by law 

Dated December 13ih, A. D. 1881». 

Hknky F Davis, 

n M „ Mortgagee. 

K. N. Marble, 

Attorney. 
D«c. 14>21-ai. Jan. 4-U-lli-85. 




o 
o 

€e 
of 

LU 

o 

DC 

o 
o 

H 
CO 

I- 
z 
< 

Q. 




GREAT SACRIFICE SALE 



Will continue Fifteen Da)s — until stock is re- 
duced, (""est or worth cuts no tigure. WE 

MUST REDUCE, even at a great loss. 

Our low prices have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Business Existence." Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock; besides, 
3'ou Tfould not stop to read ihem, but will quote 
a few to give you an idea. 

$7.49 buys an elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $ I 5. 

$9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $ I 8. 

The same reductions on all our Overcoats, 

Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 

Furnishing Goods. No reserve We must reduce 

our stock at least $£5,000 (thirty-five thousand 

dollars.) Mild weather leaves us overstocked 

and compels us to take the loss. Call and see 

our prices. 

M. S. BURROWS & CO. 




o 
o 

id 
€e 

oc 
111 

D 
QC 
O 

o 

I- 
co 

D 
CO 




PIONEER FOEL CO., 



WEATHKR FORECAST. 

Jan. 1'). —Forecast for Duluth and 
vicinity for 24 hourx commencinQ 10a.m. 
today: Colder; fair weather. 

Obsekvek, Signal Office. 



COAL 


CROSS CR[EK LEHIGH, 
FREE BURKIIIG. 

AxiHRiiciiE I mmmwi 


\\-}- 
f r 

« X 


WOOD 


Dry Maple, 

Hard Mixed, 

Slal>s, 

KdgiDip). 


CONIELL 
M 


SyiLLE 
ens HOUSE, 


CORE 



OllO[eS PfiOMPTLK D[Liy[(l[0 



TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



Office: Hotel St. Louis, 326 W. Superior St. 



PORTRAITS! 

A LIFE-SIZE PORTRAII GIVEN iW WITH EVERY PURCHASE 

OF $15 OR OVER. 

Commencing Monday, JAN. I 3, and continuing for a short 
time only, we will give away to every customer buying goods 
amounting to $ I 5 or over, a life-size Portrait of himself or any 
other person whom he may wish, guaranteeing the work to be 
perfect in every respect, as samples in our window will prove. 
This, in connection with our 

Red Figure Mark - Down Sale 

Gives you more than all the profit, but, as in the past, we are 
BOUND to be FOREMOST and LIBERAL, always giving you 
the BEST goods at the LOWEST prices, and something well 
worth having to remember us by besides. 




YARD: 


DOCK: 


Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 


Oarfield Avenu* 
1 Rices Point. 


TjlOU RENT— A ten-room bouse corner Third 
Ij street and Fifth avenue east. Furnished 
or unfurnished, will btiard with tenant or not 
as Uiey may desire. C. 8. Allen, room SAt, 
Stenson block. 


For 

rnnTv 


Sale 

jpnro 


FUn I 

-IN 


THE- 



^iwiim 



WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



ONEOTA PARK! 



ON THE MARKET JAN. 15. 



EAST END 



AT A 



Bargain. 



Tefins - Veiy - 




ous. 



This beautiful property lies just above Oneota, and is about three-quarters 
of a mile from Short Line depot, it is platted topographically; large sized 
lots, 33x125 feet; the view from it splendid; the prices are low, and the 
terms are the very best. So situated that all city improvements must enhance 
its values. 



Call at Our Office and Examine Plat. 



MACPARLANE & AUSTIN 



WEST DULUTH. 



DULUTH. 



Mortgage Sale. 



ti^Acreage near the city 
limits at below market prices. 



ADDRESS 



S "^, G-., 



Default having been made In the payment 
of the sum of three liundied and sixty 60-100 
dollars, (*JtiO ,">0-100) principal and interest which 
Is claimed to he due at the date of this notice 
upon a certain mortg-age duly executed and 
dtlivertd by Frank Uoyle. a baohelor,to.Iam s 
B. Howard and .\lexander H. Davis, bearing 
date the tenth day of November, A. D. IfW, 
and duly recorded in the oflice of the register 
of deeds in and for the county of Saint Louis 
and state of Minnesota, on the \'i\ h day of 
November A. D. 18r«<, at Sto'clocli a.m., in 
boolv "A" of mortgages, on page -t!2; and no 
action or proceeding al law or otherwlHC hav- 
ing lieen Instituted to recover the debt se- 
cured by said mortgage, or any part tliereof : 

Now, therefore, notice is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a |)ower of sale contained In said 
mortgage, and pursuant to the statute In such 
case made and provldtxl, the said mortgage 
wili'be foreclosed, and the premises descrlt>ed 
In and covered by said mortgage, viz: Lots 
numliered six (6), seven (7) and eight (8i and 
the northeast quarter (ne^) of the soutlieast 
quarter (se!*) of section numbered twenty-two 
(22), all in township No. slxty-oue (til) north of 
range No. twelve (liJ) west of tlio fourth (4th) 
principal meridian, in St. Louis county, and 
slate of .Minnesota, with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances, will lie sold at public auction, 
to the highest bidder for cash, to pay said debt 
and Interest, and the taxes (If any) on said prem- 
ises, iind twenty-flvc dollars, attorney'.s fees, 
as stipulated in and l>y said inortgHge in case 
of foreclosure, and tiie (lisbur.sements allowed 
by law; which sale will be ma<le by the sheriff 
of said St. Ix^uis county, at the fr<3ut door of 
the court house. In the city of Duluth. la said 
county anil state, on the 29tlj day 
of January, A. D. WiO, at 10:*) o'clocic a m. on 
that day. subject to redemption at any time 
within one year from the day of sale, as pro- 
vided by law. 

Dated December 13th. A. D. 188». 

James B. Howard, 

and 
AiiEXANDEK H. Davis, 
R. N. Makble, Mortgagees. 

Attorney. 

Dec. 14-21-a«. Jan. 4-11-18-25. 



A. FITGER & GO'S 

Lake Superior Brewery 

Ib the largest In the estate >f Mtn teeota ou tide 
of the Twli CItlei. 



UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



Northern Pacific Short Line. 

DULUTH TO SUPERIOR. 



Notice to Contiactofs. 



Care of Herald, Duluth. 



Except Sunday. .. 
Except Sunday. .. 
Except Sunday. . 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 

Daily. 

Daily 

Dally 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday. . . 

Daily 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 



Leave 
Duluth 



6 :»l am 
T 35 am 
haf> am 

lU 00 am 
1135 am 

1 10 pm 

2 15 pm 

3 25 pm 
330 pm 
4U0pm 

4 35 pm 

5 40 pm 
ti 45 pm 

7 15 pm 
« 25 pm 

11 10 pm 



Leave 
W. Sup'r 

ti 45 am 
7 55 am 

10 am 

10 15 am 

11 50 am 

1 2t< pm 

2 30 pm 

3 40 pm 

3 45 pm 

4 16 pm 
4 50 pui 

6 55 pm 

7 tX) pm 
7;«)pn 
it 45 pill 

11 27 pg 



Arrive 
Superior 



52 am 
«02 am 
9 17 am 

10 22 am 

11 57 am 

1 ;i5 pra 

2 37 pm 

3 47 pm 

4 25 pm 

4 57 pm 
ti tC pra 
"07 pm 



115|3pm 



SUPERIOR TO DULUTH. 



Leave \ Leave 
Superior W. Sup'r 



Dally 

Except Sunday. . 

Dally 

E.xcept Sunday. . 
Except Sunday. . 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday. . 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 

Dally 

Except Sundaj'. .. 



"s'lo 

«2|-i 

10 45 

1105 

12*5 

145 

2 50 

4 05 

505 



ami 

am' 

am i 

am I 

am 

pm! 

pm 

pm| 

Pnij 

pm 



610 

730 

1145 



pm| 
pm< 
pmj 



6 45 am 

7 07 am, 

7 40 am 

8 17 am 
S* 32 am 

10 55 am 

11 15 am 

12 42 pm 
1 52 pm 

3 IK) pm 

4 15 pm 

6 12 pm 
(! 10 pm 
ti 17 pm 

7 30 pm 
11 52 pm 



Arrive 
Duluth 

7 05 am 
7 23 am 

7 55 am 

8 35 am 

9 48 am 

11 10 am 
1130 am 

100 pm 

2 07 pm 

3 15 jim 

4 30 pm 

5 30 pm 

6 25 pro 

6 35 pm 

7 45pn. 

12 10 am 



V rthem Pacific Kailroad. 



Sealed proposals will be received at the of- 
fice of the undersigned until the 25th day of 
January, IKHO, for the erection and completion 
of 150 dwelling houses, more or less, at West 
Duluth, .Minn., for the Minnesota Iron Car 
company, according to plans and speciflcttlons 
prepare<l by the undersigned and now on tile 
at liis oHlce. Each conti-actor estimating on 
this work will be required to submit with his 
proposal, a properlj' executtnl bond of two 
respon^ilble sun-tics in the sum of $500 as a 
guarantee that In case the contract is awarded, 
he will within a reasonable time execute acou- 
tract and Iwnd satisfactory to the owners. 

The owners reserve the right to reject any 
or all bids. 

O. O. Thaphagen, 
Architect, 
Booms 510, 511, 612 and 513 First National bank 

bullying. Duluth, Minn. 



Dining Cars on Pacific 
Express Trains. 



I Leave Arrive 
I Duluth Duluth 
I Dally. Dally 



Pacific Express (limited) for 
Fargo, Helena, Butte, Ta 
ooma, Seattle and Portland, 
Grand Forks, Grafton, Win- 
nipeg 

Dakota Express, ' for Fergus 
Falls, Wahpeton, '"argo, 
Jamestown and intermediate 
polnt« 

Chicago Express, for Ashland. 
Milwaukee, Chicago and all 
Wiscocuiin Central and Mil- 
waukee, Lake Shore Sc West- 
ern points 



3.30 pm 



6.26 pm 



.15 pm 



4.00 pm 



7.55 am 



10.aOais 






GLASS BLOCK STORE. 



116, 118, 120 West Supenof tet, 



Duluth, Minn. 



The first day of our Great Clearance Sale previous to stock- 
taking proved a gigantic success. 



^1 




- Stocks - h - Eotirelf - Too - Heavy 



And must be unloaded. The Greatest Bargains ever given 
to the people are now being offered at our Bargain Empor- 
iunn. 



COST NO OSJECI--IHE GOODS MUST B[ SOLD, 



Read the following bargains. Juage whether they are cheap 
or not. If you haven't the money, borrow it and come to the 
GLAi>S BLOCK STORE and buy yourselves rich. Remember 
the fcllowing is only a sample of the thousands of bargains we 
are giving: 



S LOT OF 




Worth 50c per pair. 



MUSLIN UNDERWEAR. 

Your pick of Ladies' Chemise, Night Gowns, Drawers, Corset Covers and 
Skirts, worth 75c, 85c, 89c, 95c and $1.00. Take them while they last for 
50c. 

A ijrand assortment of Chemise, worth 69c, for 39c. 

Corset Covers for 15c, lace-trimmed. 

50 Dozen Ladies' Wool Hose, worth 29c to 39c. Take them while they 
last fo- 19c per pair. 

V/OOL UNDERWEAR. 

Lot I. Children's Merino Underwear. Pick 15c, worth 25c. 

Lot 2. Children's Natural and Scarlet Wool Underwear, 25c, worth 50c. 

Lot 3. Children's Natural and Sc.trlet Wool Underwear, 48c, worth 89c. 

LADIES' UNDERWEAR. 

39: each for Ladies' Merino Underwear, worth 65c and 75c. 

SCARLET WOOL AND MEDICATED. 

75c Each for your choice of our best Scarlet Wool Underwear, ribbed and 
hemmed bottoms, sold all over for $ 1 .25 and $1.39. To make them go fast, 
75c. 

MITTENS. 

Ladies' Kid Mittens and Gloves, 95c, worth $1 50. 
Ladies' Wool Mittens for 25c, worth 39c and 45c. 
Ladies' Fancy Saxony Mittens, 50c, worth 75c and 95c. 
CNIdren's Mitts at lOc, I 5c and 20c, worth just double. 

GENT'S UNDERWEAR. 

59: for Cent's Scarlet Underwear, worth $ 1 .25. 

$ 1 .00 for Gent's Fine Wool Underwear, worth $ 1 .75. 

FUR - DEPARTMENT. 

50 Seal Caps for Ladies or Gentlemen, at $10; sold elsewhere for $16 
and $16. 

COMFORTERS. 

I 5 3 Comforters, worth $1, for 75c. 
9 3 Comforters, worth $ 1 .25, for 80c. 
6 3 Comforters, worth $ 1 .50, for $ I 00. 
51 Comlorters, worth $1 .65, for $1.10. 

SATEENS. 

READ CAREFULLY. We mean just what we say. Our entire stock of 
FRENCH Sateens, worth 35c and 45c; while they last, your pick for 12 l-2c 
per yard. 

PRINTS. 

4 I -2c per ycrd for your choice of 200 pieces Standard Prints, worth 7c. 

LINEN DEPARTMENT. 

37(: Per yard for full bleached Damasks, worth 50c. 
49(: for Damasks formerly sold for 65c. 
55i: for Damasks formerly sold for 75c. 
65(: for Damasks formerly sold for 85c. 

FLANNELS. 

lOc per yard for our regular 15c Flannels. 
12 l-2c " " " 20c " 



r 



/ 



^ 




24( 
25< 
35< 



30c 
35c 
45c 



CARPETS. 



4-Frame Body Brussels, made, laid and lined for 93c. 
5-Frame Bodies made, laid and lined for $1.15. 







All our Remnants of Tapestries, worth 65c, 75c, 85c and 95c. Pick of 
the lot for 50c per yard. 

CLOAKS! SHAWLS! WRAPS. 

$*.S Plush Cloaks now $1.5. 
1:8.50 Plush Cloaks now $18.75. 
$15 Beaver Newmarkets now $7.50. 
C lildren's Cloaks at nearly half prioe. 

MILLINERY DEPARTMENT. 

ICc Each tor Felt Hats, worth 50c to 75c. 
5Cc Each for Felt Hats, worth 95c to Sl.'25. 

OUR CANDY DEPARTMENT 



To be cosed out to make room for 
REGULAR PRICE, '40c; NOW 15c. 



stationery, etc. FRENCH CREAMS, 



Barga ns in every department of our great store until Feb. 
Come now while our selection is large and unbroken. 
Bring this along and secure the bargains. 



AU trains daily. Through sleeper Iroir 
Duluth on Dakota express leavliJK at 7:16 p 
uj . Free Colonist Sleepers are run on Pacini 
Express leaving Duluth at 8:30 p. m. 

JNO. C. KOBTNSON, 
Ttoket Ag«nt, Union Depot. 




N k WATSON 

























I 






















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